Big turnout, lots of fun at graphic design senior show

November 28th, 2012 Comments Off on Big turnout, lots of fun at graphic design senior show

Full portfolios were set up at the reception for everyone to see more of the students’ work. Stephanie Faerber, left, enjoys showing off her hardwork.

A reception was held Tuesday, Nov. 27 for the Graphic Design BFA Senior Portfolio Show, Oh Snap!

Work such as posters, packaging, web design, illustration, identity, ad campaigns and more was on display, and a photo booth was set up for everyone to enjoy.

The eight graduating seniors were Stephanie Faerber, Joseph Johnston, Allison Keller, Jillian Matthews, Helen Simpkins, Richard Soto, Kelsey Stephens and Clara Thames.

The show will stay open through Tuesday, Dec. 4 in the Visual Arts Center Gallery on University Drive. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

See more at www.ohsnapmsu.com.

Graphic Design senior show to be on display Nov. 27–Dec. 4

November 20th, 2012 Comments Off on Graphic Design senior show to be on display Nov. 27–Dec. 4


(By Helen Simpkins)
Mississippi State University’s Department of Art invites you to the MSU Graphic Design BFA Senior Portfolio Show, Oh Snap!, which will be open Tuesday, Nov. 27 through Tuesday, Dec. 4 in the Visual Arts Center Gallery on University Drive.

Astounding work from eight seniors will be displayed throughout the week, including posters, packaging, web design, illustration, identity, ad campaigns and more. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

The public is invited to a reception to honor these graduating seniors on Tuesday, Nov. 27 at 5:30 p.m. All participants’ complete portfolio books will be featured that night for your enjoyment. Strike a pose, and capture the moment with our eight graduating designers: Stephanie Faerber, Joseph Johnston, Allison Keller, Jillian Matthews, Helen Simpkins, Richard Soto, Kelsey Stephens and Clara Thames.

Expose yourself to the senior portfolios at www.ohsnapmsu.com.

For more information, contact Professor Jamie Mixon, Graphic Design Coordinator at 662.325.2970.

Lydia Thomson to exhibit at Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art

November 19th, 2012 Comments Off on Lydia Thomson to exhibit at Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art

Lydia Thompson | Eastern Gardens, 2003 | Acrylic on canvas | 30″ x 24″

Lydia Thompson will have an exhibit of her work on display with the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art at the Beau Rivage Resort & Casino Gallery in Biloxi from Dec. 11 though Jun 1, 2013.

The head of the Department of Art, Thompson’s exhibit is titled “Roots, Connections & Pathways” and is part of the Expanding Traditions gallery.

The work was inspired by the paradox of the cotton boll’s attractiveness as a natural form and its repugnance as a symbol of a history of exploitation.

“Roots, Connections & Pathways” includes a series of diverse works in various media.

A reception will be held on Dec. 8 from 4-6 p.m.  For more information, visit www.georgeohr.org.

Exhibit Poster

Receptions held for senior thesis exhibit, COMMUNE

November 19th, 2012 Comments Off on Receptions held for senior thesis exhibit, COMMUNE

Ten seniors were part of the thesis exhibit, COMMUNE. (Left to right, front row: Rebekah Trotter, Jesse Thames, Sarah Qarqish, Emily Hobart, Lindsey Rushing and Anna Katherine Phipps. Second row, left to right: Professor Brent Funderburk, Aaron Autin, Charlotte Smith, Amanda Jefcoat and Dawn Taylor. Not pictured: Nathan McRee)

Read the story from Nov. 15 by Daniel Hart | The Reflector

Fulbright Ambassador shares experience with art students

November 16th, 2012 Comments Off on Fulbright Ambassador shares experience with art students

Dr. Stephen Cottrell, campus co-representative for Fulbright, joined Ambassador Rachel Stevens to tell Department of Art students about the Fulbright Program. Cottrell said the program gives students a huge advantage for seeking future employment and encouraged all to apply.

Rachel Stevens serves as an ambassador for the Fulbright Program.

As a child, Rachel Stevens entertained herself by building forts and tree houses.

The daughter of a single mother without a lot of money, Stevens said she got creative in her sources of entertainment. Though, she said, “I probably would have done that anyway.”

Stevens, who is now a sculptor and professor at New Mexico State University, said her childhood definitely shaped her future.

“My approach to my career has been very resourceful,” she said. “I’ve always sought out opportunities.”

One of those opportunities came through a Fulbright grant she received to do research in Nepal.

While there, Stevens met a master of copper casting and was able to visit some of his statue making workshops. She explained his process to include a variety of steps that involved hay, mud and wax.

Stevens was also able to work with the copper sculptor and some of his team and family members on two projects while she was in Nepal.

With the first project, “First Impressions Nepal,” Stevens mainly oversaw the vision of the work. However, with the second project, a Bodhi Tree, she was able to be a lot more hands-on.

Stevens said one of the most important things she learned through the Fulbright Program was “letting go of who you are here.” She said the family she was working closely with would often want to take their time to enjoy a meal or just talk, and it was hard for her to not want to just go straight to work.

“Through this program, you just learn more about yourself,” she said. “It’s just a most profound experience.”

Department of Art students, professor featured on WCBI

November 15th, 2012 Comments Off on Department of Art students, professor featured on WCBI


Professor Brent Funderburk and students Rebekah Trotter (photography) and Charlotte Smith (sculpture) were featured on the WCBI Mid-Morning Show with Andrea on Nov. 15.

The group discussed the senior thesis class and their current exhibit “Commune,” which will be in the Department of Art Gallery in McComas Hall, the gallery in the Colvard Student Union and the Visual Arts Center Gallery until Nov. 17. (Find out more information on the thesis group’s website.)

Art alumnus highlighted for aerial mass-transit idea

November 13th, 2012 Comments Off on Art alumnus highlighted for aerial mass-transit idea

Frog Principal Designer Michael McDaniel recently presented a system of 3S detachable gondolas connecting neighborhoods throughout Austin,Texas, making it possible for cyclists and pedestrians to “hop” over particularly congested areas. (Image from fastcodesign.com)

Michael McDaniel, a 1998 graphic design alumnus from the Department of Art at Mississippi State, has recently been highlighted for his aerial mass-transit proposal for 21st century cities.

McDaniel, a principal designer at frog, said the side project began as a way to teach junior designers “how to do design research and break up complex problems into attackable chunks.”

He was invited to speak about the concept at the PSFK conference in San Fransisco on Nov. 1 and said the project has since taken off.

Check out his interview with Fast Company.

Read the feature by PSFK.

Lippillo has solo show at Estrella Mountain Community College

November 12th, 2012 Comments Off on Lippillo has solo show at Estrella Mountain Community College

An example of some of the work in the exhibit by Dominic Lippillo and Mark Schoon.

From Estrella Mountain Community College:

AVONDALE, Arizona  – Have you ever thought of your medicine cabinet as piece of art? An innovatively eye catching art exhibit titled “Defining Place,” featuring photographic artists Dominic Lippillo and Mark Schoon, will provide proof that it truly can be. Their artwork will be on display at Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) from Nov. 7 through Jan. 31. It is free and open to the public during campus hours.

Lippillo and Schoon created a unique collaboration with their photographic art, even though they were over 1,114 miles apart. Through the use of the diptych format, two images come together to form a dialogue about proximity, locality and space versus place. Their process comprises of one photographer capturing a seemingly mundane image of his home and sending it to the other. The recipient in turn responds with a second image, which mirrors the first but with a different perspective and independent contrast with the intent to create a “conversation” pertaining to the definition, use and perception of place. Their images range from a comparison of medicine cabinets to window treatments.

EMCC, located at Thomas and Dysart roads in Avondale, Ariz., welcomed Lippillo and Schoon to the campus for a Visiting Artist’s Lecture on Wednesday, Nov. 7, where the artists shared their inspiration; explained the relevance of their unique, collaborative art; and participated in an audience dialogue.

“We hope that the exhibition and related workshops will give EMCC students an opportunity to learn about the value of collaboration, sharing and empathy while fostering cross cultural awareness and dialogue,” said Jimmy Fike, Art Professor at EMCC and organizer of the exhibition.

In addition to this duo’s domestic juxtaposition exhibit, some of their individual photographic artwork will also be on display. Lippillo and Schoon are nationally known, with artwork published in Lens Scratch, Exposure, and Culture Map.

Selections from their ongoing collaborative series “Anti-Local” are included in the permanent collection at The Museum of Photographic Art and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

These talented artists both earned their Master of Fine Arts in Photography from Ohio University in 2009. Working independently with lens based media, they soon realized they had shared interests. Today, Lippillo is an Assistant Professor of Art at Mississippi State University, and Schoon is an Assistant Professor of Art at the University of West Georgia.

Grant makes Chicago trip a reality for 3D students

November 9th, 2012 Comments Off on Grant makes Chicago trip a reality for 3D students

The group at Millennium Park. (left to right): Professor Critz Campbell, Charlotte Smith, Mary-Lucas Halliwell, April Shelby, Emily Hobart, Jeff Porter, Jon Nowell, Morgan Welch and Sarah Kilpatrick

Critz Campbell, professor of sculpture in the Department of Art at Mississippi State University, recently secured a $30,000 grant. Campbell said the grant’s overall goal is to increase students’ exposure to the outside world.

Twenty percent of the funds have already been allocated to the College of Architecture, Art and Design’s Visiting Artists Committee, which will begin to bring artists in for lectures and workshops this spring.

“I wanted to spend half the money bringing artists to the students but also half of it taking students to the art,” Campbell said.

So, the professor used another portion of the money to take eight 3D students in the Department of Art, whose emphasis of study is either sculpture or ceramics, to Chicago from Nov. 1–4.

The trip to Chicago was a first for all but one of the eight students

Though Charlotte Smith had been to Chicago before on a few brief trips, she had never visited the Art Institute of Chicago and said her favorite part about the trip was getting to see artwork in person that she’s only been able to experience through pictures before.

“It was also nice just being in a place where they want sculptures in parks,” she said, referring to Millennium Park, which the group was able to tour with Liz Edwards, special projects manager.

Another student, Jeff Porter, said he enjoyed that the whole trip was about art, unlike many of the trips he takes with friends who don’t want to see art.

“That was really nice to be immersed in that setting,” he said.

Campbell’s main purpose for the trip was for the students to experience the International Exhibit of Sculpture Objects and Functional Art (S.O.F.A.). There, they were able to view galleries from all over the world, along with high-end craft work. They also saw demos and were able to gather information from some nontraditional craft schools such as Penland and Haystack.

S.O.F.A. was also a great opportunity for the students to observe the commerce of art. Campbell said students learn how to make art in school and often get to see works displayed in museums, but “that doesn’t teach students how to make a living making art.”

Thanks to a patron of Campbell’s, John Bryan, the group was able to squeeze in a lot of other valuable art experiences as well.

They visited the Museum of Contemporary Art – Chicago, toured the ceramics and sculpture graduate facilities at the School of Art Institute of Chicago, viewed Bryan’s private arts and crafts collection at Crab Tree Farm, saw a demo by Mike Jarvi on steam bending and even took an architectural boat tour.

The trip definitely accomplished the grant’s mission of increasing students’ exposure to the outside world, and Campbell said he plans to take further advantage of the funds by exposing more 3D students to such experiences next year.

Art professor designs posters via screen printing

November 9th, 2012 Comments Off on Art professor designs posters via screen printing

(Photo from The Reflector)

(By DANIEL HART | The Reflector)

Assistant professor of art Jude Landry does not teach notorious subjects like calculus, physics or chemistry. Although he said he excelled at them in school, classes such as screen printing, where students learn to design and print posters, are his specialty. Just one among the graphic design courses he teaches, Landry’s screen printing class was brought to Mississippi State University with his return to the South. Continuing what he said has become a primary course in his repertoire, Landry constructed the class from scratch.

“I had taught a screen printing course in Illinois as a special topics graphic design class, and they wanted me to continue that here, so we set up a screen printing facility in Briscoe Hall. I’ve been teaching the class ever since,” he said.

In a time of commonplace digital technology, Landry said screen printing is his chosen method of producing work due to its inherent tactile qualities and broad range of possibilities.

“Screen printing is a valuable process today because it has a thicker layer of ink. You can print with metallic inks and colored papers these (digital) printers can’t use; it gives them a different quality you can’t reproduce,” he said.

The subject of the class is a natural extension of his inclinations, as Landry said poster design is his preferred format of work.

“I fell in love with posters in school. The possibilities are so wide. Throughout the past century, a lot of graphic design that was at the forefront of being innovative and creative was poster design,” he said. “Some of my design heroes are poster artists; it’s a simple format, a blank sheet of paper like a canvas for an artist.”

Landry said an infatuation with posters was a catalyst behind his decision to pursue graphic design, rather than architecture, at Louisiana Tech University.

“I had drawn some stuff in Microsoft Paint in high school, and I fell in love with posters and logos. I don’t think in high school I knew what graphic design was,” he said. “When I visited LA Tech and saw the work their students were producing, I thought, ‘This is pretty cool stuff, and I want to check it out,’ so I switched my major,” he said.

Landry said another graphic design element of particular interest to him is the creation of typography.

“Typography is what makes graphic design very unique; if you’re not using typography, you’re probably an illustrator or artist,” he said.

Though he has no formal education in lettering, Landry said he is self-taught and creates his own type projects to hone his skills.

“I’ve drawn entire alphabets, but never made them into a working font. To make a font you have to design uppercase, lowercase, numbers and punctuation. One day I’ll be able to knock out a whole font and feel good about it, like it’s competent,” he said.

“Not like Comic Sans or something,” he added with a laugh.

As both educator and artist, Landry said the personal work he does outside the required 18 hours of class contact time a week is either paid freelance work or personally-driven projects.

“A lot of the freelance work I do is custom illustration type design and logo making. Time not spent on paid freelance work is spent creating my own art prints and selling them online and at art and craft festivals,” he said.

Landry said he has spent time building his portfolio since he began selling at festivals and focuses on local opportunities to display his work.

“There are lots close by. I do the Cotton District Arts Festival, the Prairie Arts Festival in West Point, one in Jackson; I’ve started doing some in Nashville,” he said.

Aside from these unique opportunities to view and purchase Landry’s work, his posters, prints and T-shirts can be viewed and bought through his website, judelandry.com.

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