Longtime MSU art professor to retire

April 30th, 2018 Comments Off on Longtime MSU art professor to retire

Brent Funderburk – MSU Art Professor, painting in his home studio.
(photo by Megan Bean / © Mississippi State University)

Charlie Benton | Starkville Daily News

After 36 years teaching art at Mississippi State University and 40 years total in academia, Brent Funderburk will retire from the university on May 22, his 66th birthday.

Funderburk came to MSU as a painting teacher, after time spent painting in North Carolina. Prior to coming to MSU, Funderburk also served on the ar faculties of Nebraska Wesleyan University and East Carolina University, his alma mater. In addition to his teaching and painting, Funderburk is also regarded as an expert on Mississippi Gulf Coast artist Walter Inglis Anderson. While a student at ECU, he studied under painters Edward Reep and Paul Hartley.

“I think 40 years is a good number, and I really desire to be a painter full-time,” Funderburk said.

Despite his desire to paint full-time, Funderburk said he would miss being able to support students on their journey and watch them grow as artists.

“I love the fact that as a visual artist, you can actually physically see young people grow, because we have visual evidence,” Funderburk said. “In other words, their souls are on the outside. They can look whatever way they want to look, but you can’t hide the fact that in visual art, your innards are going to be seen.”

Funderburk expressed a desire to stay young in his retirement as he painted and travelled. He said he was able to stay young as a professor, by spending so much time around college students.

“I’ve just been hanging out with 20-year-olds for 40 years, so I’m going to miss that,” Funderburk said. “I am not going to be the guy at the Hardee’s every morning with the other old farts. That’s not me. I love them. I’ll wave at them as I pass by going to the art store, but I’m going to do 20-year-old stuff, living the life, working really hard painting a lot.”

Funderburk first became interested in art growing up with his twin brother in Charlotte, North Carolina in the 1950s and 1960s. He said his parents provided him and his brother with art supplies to give them something constructive to do, and keep them out of trouble.

“My parents always provided us with paper, crayons, art supplies, and we somehow were absorbed throughout almost all of our childhood with playing together and making things,” Funderburk said. “It was something natural that we did. My brother now is a very successful architect.”

As he grew up and went to art school, Funderburk became interested in designing album covers for bands popular during the time period. However, as he prepared to graduate, cassette tapes became the norm.

“Sad little tiny things that fall apart easily, and really an affront to artists,” Funderburk said.

While he was figuring out his next step as he was finishing his Master of Fine Arts degree, someone told Funderburk he might make a good teacher. He then started applying to academic positions in 1978, ending up at NWU.

After a few years at NWU, Funderburk left, and was living and painting in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains. However, he began to miss teaching, and again started searching for academic positions.

“I found that I could not as easily teach squirrels and snakes,” Funderburk said. “The classes didn’t go very well with those snails and turtles and frogs. I missed it, so I applied for the only job that I’ve ever seen in any job search at the university level, where the name of the position was ‘watercolor artist.’ Almost always it’s ‘painter,’ or ‘drawing’ at a university position, something like that, but this was for a watercolor painter, so that was unique.”

Funderburk said the location in Mississippi piqued his interest a little, because of his prior knowledge of Walter Anderson.

“The fact that Mississippi State very particularly wanted an academic watercolor painter, was very attractive to me,” Funderburk said.
Funderburk plans to stay in Starkville after he retires.

“My wife, Debby, teaches dance, and has taught dance here for 25 years at State, and she is still teaching,” Funderburk said. “We’ll travel a lot, and I’ll be working a lot, and I’ll show my work a lot across the country and internationally. It’s a great college town, a great place for a headquarters to be an artist in the 21st century.”

Funderburk described his work as being inspired by nature, but said he didn’t consider himself a landscape painter. The last class he will teach at MSU will be a Walter Anderson course, involving making trips to the Mississippi barrier islands to paint as Anderson once did.

A public reception for Funderburk will be held by the MSU College of Architecture, Art and Design in the Dawg House at the Colvard Student Union on May 2 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

“I’m thankful to God for being at Mississippi State, and for everyone who’s been with me along the way,” Funderburk said.

Read more in the Maroon Memo.

MSU alumni return for Department of Art’s creative education, careers panel

April 19th, 2018 Comments Off on MSU alumni return for Department of Art’s creative education, careers panel

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Reinforcing Mississippi State’s commitment to prepare students to become leaders in their chosen professions, five alumni are returning Friday [April 20] to share their success stories during the Department of Art’s Eric and Gina Yonge Lecture Series.

Taking place at 9:30 a.m. in the Colvard Student Union’s second-floor Bill R. Foster Ballroom, the “Creative Education to Creative Careers” panel discussion is part of the art department’s 50th anniversary celebration. The event is moderated by Starkville native and MSU alumnus Eric Yonge, president and creative director of Kennesaw, Georgia-based EYStudios, a leading e-commerce brand development firm.

With a $25,000 donation to the MSU Foundation, Yonge and his wife, Gina, established the lecture series in 2015 to engage fine arts students in thoughtful discussions on how to market themselves and their talents.

“This event is a great opportunity for students across our department, college and university to see and hear from five alumni who have translated their college education into professional careers,” said Angi Bourgeois, MSU art department professor and head.

In addition to Yonge, panelists include:

—Jerry Jackson, a 1989 MSU art/fine arts graduate who has been a photo editor for The Baltimore Sun since 1996. Prior to moving to Baltimore, he worked as a photo editor for the Houston Post and at the Union Democrat in Sonora, California. He also studied photojournalism at the University of Missouri. For more, visit http://www.baltimoresun.com/bal-jerry-jackson-20150320-staff.html.

—Kristen Ley, a 2007 MSU art/graphic design graduate who also minored in marketing. Following graduation, she and fellow MSU classmate Catherine Yerger opened Cultigraphic Creative to explore their shared passion for art and design through projects for various clients. In 2011, Ley purchased a 1925 10 x 15 Chandler and Price letterpress and opened Thimblepress gift shop in Jackson. The name is derived from a collection of thimbles she has acquired during her travels since childhood. For more, visit https://www.thimblepress.com/meet-kristen?v=7516fd43adaa.

—Wesley Stuckey, a Baltimore, Maryland-based designer, printmaker and educator whose work has been featured in various publications and exhibitions across the Southeast, Mid-Atlantic and Midwest. In addition to traditional print design and printmaking, his work focuses on branding, illustration and environmental graphics, with occasional interactive projects for the web. A 2008 MSU art/graphic design and printmaking graduate, Stuckey teaches branding, typography, hand-letter, web design and basic design at the Maryland Institute College of Art, where he earned a master’s in fine art in 2011. Stuckey also teaches at the University of Maryland Baltimore County and runs his own design studio practice. He served as a juror for the art department’s recent 50th Anniversary Alumni Exhibition. For more, visit http://wesleystuckey.com/about.

—Adam Trest, a watercolorist who owns Adam Trest Home retail store in Laurel. He graduated in 2009 with an MSU bachelor’s in art/painting and a minor in architectural design. He often is inspired by the native flora and fauna, as well as the historical districts around Mississippi. For more, visit www.adamtrest.com.

Additional information about the Department of Art’s 50th anniversary celebration is available by contacting Bourgeois at 662-325-8926 or ABourgeois@caad.msstate.edu.

Part of the College of Architecture, Art and Design, MSU’s Department of Art is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. For more, visit www.caad.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

 

Graphic design seniors present ‘Layered’ exhibition at MSU

April 16th, 2018 Comments Off on Graphic design seniors present ‘Layered’ exhibition at MSU

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

 

From illustration and web development to branding and package design, 13 fine art seniors at Mississippi State are showcasing a variety of skills in a new exhibition at the university’s Visual Arts Center Gallery.

On display April 17-21 at 808 University Drive, “Layered” celebrates the all-female graduating class’s completion of studio work in MSU’s Department of Art.

In addition to physical displays, the students’ portfolio books and self-promotional pieces will be available for viewing on opening night. For a preview, visit layered2018.com and follow on Instagram @layered_2018.

“Each designer brings a new dimension and unique style just as each layer adds depth to a design,” said student exhibitor Jennifer K. “Jenn” McFadden of Huntsville, Alabama.

A 6-7:30 p.m. opening reception in the students’ honor takes place Tuesday [April 17] at the Visual Arts Center Gallery, where complimentary refreshments will be available.

Gallery hours are 12:30-5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 1-4 p.m. Saturday. The exhibition will be open April 21 during MSU’s Super Bulldog Weekend and Starkville’s Cotton District Arts Festival.

The “Layered” exhibitors include (by hometown):
AMORY—Amy Frances Farrar and Reagan N. Huffman
BRANDON—Alison P. Meeler
CLEVELAND—Justice B. Williams. She also is concentrating in photography
ELK RIVER, Minnesota—Sarah Tewolde
HUNTSVILLE, Alabama—Jennifer K. “Jenn” McFadden
LITTLE ROCK—Abbey E. Rigdon
LONG BEACH—Morgan N.A. Linnett
MADISON, Alabama—Lauryn O. Rody
MADISON—Madeline K. “Maddie” Marascalco
MENDENHALL—Samantha J. Sumrall
MERIDIAN—Caitlyn Ainsworth
PETAL—Haylee R. Upton

Celebrating 50 years, MSU’s Department of Art is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. For more, visit www.caad.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Historic print shop works featured in new exhibition at MSU

January 27th, 2018 Comments Off on Historic print shop works featured in new exhibition at MSU

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

STARKVILLE, Miss.—Iconic works from the archives of a historic Nashville letterpress print shop are on display through March 2 at Mississippi State University’s Visual Arts Center Gallery.

Free to all, the exhibition in the gallery at 808 University Drive in Starkville features vintage and contemporary posters from Hatch Show Print, the “Music City”-based shop housed in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

Since 1879, HSP has worked to educate diverse audiences by creating and sharing a vast collection of well-known designs commemorating America’s evolving identity. The company’s first print job was a handbill announcing the appearance of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”

HSP has created handmade posters for musicians such as the late, legendary African-American jazz and blues entertainers Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong, as well as show posters for country music icons including the late Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson. The shop’s print work in the 21st century has expanded to designs for vinyl record covers, packaging and books. For more, visit http://hatchshowprint.com.

VAC Gallery hours are 1-5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 1-4 p.m., Saturday.

A 5-6 p.m. reception will take place Thursday, Feb. 15, at the VAC gallery. Refreshments will be available, and all are welcome.

Celene Aubrey, manager of Hatch Show Print, will give a 12:30 p.m. public presentation Friday, Feb. 16, in the Fazio Jury Room at Giles Hall, home to MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design.

Lori Neuenfeldt, the MSU Department of Art’s gallery director, expressed appreciation for Professor and Graphic Design Coordinator Jamie Mixon and other departmental colleagues who assisted in making the exhibition and related programs possible.

For more information, contact Neuenfeldt at 662-325-2970 or LNeuenfeldt@caad.msstate.edu.

Learn more about MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design and its Department of Art at www.caad.msstate.eduor follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

‘Elements of Design’ exhibition at MSU showcases talents of graduating graphic design majors

November 27th, 2017 Comments Off on ‘Elements of Design’ exhibition at MSU showcases talents of graduating graphic design majors

On display Nov. 28-Dec. 5 at Mississippi State’s Visual Arts Center Gallery, the “Elements of Design” exhibition features works of nine fine art seniors completing their graphic design studies in the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. The student exhibitors include (front row, left to right) Austin Thomas, Vernon McCoy Jr., Aubrey Pohl; (middle row, left to right) Heather Hardman, Alleigh Moffett, Matthew Rogers; (top row, left to right) Morgan Donour, Paige Knapp and Marianna Myrick. (Submitted photo)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Works of nine fine art seniors specializing in graphic design at Mississippi State will be on display Nov. 28-Dec. 5 at the Visual Arts Center Gallery.

Free to all, the “Elements of Design” exhibition in the gallery at 808 University Drive in Starkville celebrates the conclusion of the students’ studies in the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program.

“These nine brand new design elements are bursting with creative energy and ready to go out into the world and change the entire foundation of design,” said Suzanne Powney, MSU assistant professor of graphic design. 

Portfolio works in “Elements of Design” range from illustrative poster designs and eye-catching advertisements to compelling web design layouts and packaging. In addition to the physical displays, individual portfolio books and self-promotional pieces will be available for viewing on opening night. For a preview, visit www.elementsofdesignmsstate.com and follow on Instagram @elementsofdesignmsstate.

A 6-7:30 p.m. opening reception in the students’ honor will take place Tuesday [Nov. 28] at the VAC gallery. Complimentary refreshments will be provided by Two Brothers Smoked Meats in Starkville.

Gallery hours are 1-5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 1-4 p.m., Saturday. 

The “Elements of Design” exhibitors include (by hometown):

  • Bay Saint Louis—Aubrey J. Pohl.
  • Birmingham, Alabama—Heather C. Hardman.
  • Fannin—Vernon E. McCoy Jr., who also is concentrating in fine arts.
  • Flowood—Marianna G. Myrick.
  • Fulton—Alleigh T. Moffett; and Austin L. Thomas.
  • Tupelo—Paige F. Knapp; and Matthew B. Rogers.
  • West Point—Morgan R. Donour.

For more information, contact Lori Neuenfeldt, the MSU Department of Art’s gallery director, at 662-325-2970 or LNeuenfeldt@caad.msstate.edu.

Learn more about MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design and its Department of Art on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

‘Contact F17’ exhibition celebrates MSU photography seniors’ work

November 14th, 2017 Comments Off on ‘Contact F17’ exhibition celebrates MSU photography seniors’ work

“Doll Head” by Jenna Todd is part of her series that captures details left behind in abandoned structures. (Submitted/by Jenna Todd)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Diverse works by graduating majors of Mississippi State’s Department of Art are on display Nov. 16-Dec. 1 in the university’s Cullis Wade Depot Art Gallery.

Free to all, the “Contact F17: BFA Photography Thesis Exhibition” celebrates the final year of studies for five students enrolled in the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. They include Kamau J. Bostic of Richmond, Virginia; Jenni L. Kilburn of Duck Hill; Chauncey D. Mangum of Florence; Jenna A. Todd of Quincy, Illinois; and Whitney A. White of Oxford.

Gallery hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday, as well as by appointment.

A public reception takes place 5-6 p.m. Thursday [Nov. 16] in the Cullis Wade Depot Art Gallery on the second floor of the university’s Welcome Center at 75 B.S. Hood Drive. Refreshments will be provided.

“Contact F17” reflects the students’ successful conclusion of departmental research, writing and presentation requirements, as well as four years of foundational coursework, survey, art history, and academic and emphasis classes.

During their time at MSU, the students have benefited from the expertise and support of Professor Marita Gootee and Assistant Professor Dominic Lippillo. Both teach in the department’s photography emphasis area, with Gootee as its longtime coordinator.

Bostic’s body of work “My Generation” focuses on the inspiration and identity of individuals with tattoos and explores millennial ideals and attitudes regarding body art. Communicating through the visual language of photography was Bostic’s primary goal.

For her photographic series “Chemical Balance,” Kilburn created representational and metaphorical depictions of anxiety disorders, the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults age 18 and older. Each image is designed to show how time seems to stop and last forever for those dealing with such disorders, while appearing only as a passing moment to the viewer.   

Mangum’s series of images “Reminders” focuses on the African American community where he grew up. Visiting with relatives and others while working on this project inspired him to overcome a sense of fear to return home and gave him a better understanding of how his past has shaped his future.

Todd captured the hidden details left behind in abandoned homes, schools, hospitals, hotels and churches. Through her collection of photographs “Forsaken with Time,” Todd seeks to convey each location’s unique story while giving readers a fascinating glimpse into the past.

Titled “Fragmented Abstraction,” White’s photographic series shows the unknown beauty of friends and family members with whom she has grown close. Individual photographs are organized in a grid to convey the connection that exists between family and friends, as well as help the viewer focus on the abstracted form and beauty of the human body.

In addition to the art department, the “Contact F17” exhibition is made possible with support from the Center for Student Activities. For more information, contact Lori Neuenfeldt, the MSU art department’s gallery director, at 662-325-2970 or LNeuenfeldt@caad.msstate.edu.

Learn more about MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design and its Department of Art at www.caad.msstate.edu, as well as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

MYTH-issippi lecture held on October 19

October 20th, 2017 Comments Off on MYTH-issippi lecture held on October 19

By Kelsey Brownlee, Mississippi State University student

“Myth-issippi: How Art Makes Place” was an illustrated talk by Brent Funderburk –  W. L. Giles Distinguished Professor of Art at Mississippi State University –  followed by a musical performance in the Colvard Student Union Dawghouse on Thurs., Oct. 19 from 6 to 8 p.m. 

Also premiered was the newly renovated Dawghouse and the mural “Black Prairie, Mississippi, World,”created by MSU art students Shawna Williams and Randi Watson.

After Funderburk’s talk,W.L. Giles Distinguished Professors of Entomology Richard Brown and Funderburk talked on life and culture on our unique Black(belt) Prairie, which then turned into a concert of Blues music performed by Caleb Childs and the Blues Review, featuring Dr. Brown on harmonica.

Noted painter to give lecture and workshop on MSU campus

October 13th, 2017 Comments Off on Noted painter to give lecture and workshop on MSU campus

“Reflections in Marseilles, France” (18″ x 24″, on linen) | Matthew Lee

Matthew Lee

By Brent Funderburk

Matthew Lee, plein air painter and architect, will lecture and give a student workshop on the Mississippi State University campus in October. Lee is an alumnus of MSU where he received a BA in Architecture with a minor in Art in 1989.

Lee will present a public lecture “In Colored Air: Painting in the Heart of Nature” from 7 to 8 p.m. in the Fazio Jury Room of Giles Hall (first floor, CAAD/Architecture Building) on Thurs., Oct. 26. The illustrated talk is free of charge.

Born in Paris, France, Lee’s childhood years gave him the opportunity to see the art and architecture of the Louvre, the Versailles Palace, the painter’s square at Montmartre, cathedrals, the European countryside and shore, and many other landmarks. The rich culture of France was deeply imprinted on his life. Lee was a U. S. Fulbright Scholar in 1991-1992 where he studied temples murals and architecture in Sri Lanka. He will bring this love of the landscape, color and outdoor painting into a three-day en plein air workshop with advanced painting students from Oct. 24–26. Samples of his artwork may be seen at matthewleestudio.com.

In addition to his interest in painting, Lee is also a licensed architect and practiced architecture full time for 22 years prior to launching a full-time art business in Memphis, Tenn.

The lecture and workshop is supported by the Mississippi State University Department of Art; the College of Architecture, Art and Design; and MSU painting concentration students.

For more information, please contact Brent Funderburk, W. L. Giles Professor of Art, 662-325-2970, bfunderburk@caad.sstate.edu.

See the story at msstate.edu.

Read the story in The Columbus Dispatch.

Read the story about the workshop in The Starkville Daily News.

MSU celebrates Magnolia State bicentennial with fall event series

October 10th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU celebrates Magnolia State bicentennial with fall event series

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University is sponsoring a fall-semester series of fun, educational events to commemorate the Magnolia State’s bicentennial.

Jim Giesen–MSU History professor environmental portrait

With support from the Mississippi Humanities Council through the Mississippi Development Authority, the official bicentennial project kicks off Sept. 6 with a 5 p.m. presentation in Mitchell Memorial Library’s third-floor John Grisham Room. Organized by the university’s Museums and Galleries Committee, the free talk “Farming in Mississippi: A Brief History” will be given by MSU Associate Professor of History Jim Giesen.

Also free to all is a Sept. 13 talk titled “Writing Across the Color Line: Conversations, Intersections and Chance Encounters in Mississippi Literary History.” Given by MSU Associate Professor of English and African American Studies Donald Shaffer, the presentation will begin at 5 p.m. in the Grisham Room.

 “The Museums and Galleries Committee is really excited to be putting together this series of events to celebrate the history of Mississippi,” said event coordinator Amy Moe-Hoffman, an instructor in MSU’s Department of Geosciences.

“We began with the idea of showcasing university specimens in a collaborative exhibit,” she continued, “but with the help of a grant from the Mississippi Humanities Council, we were able to expand our programming to include speakers, music, receptions and exhibits that will allow attendees to have a deeper level of engagement with the history of our state.”

Donald Shaffer environmental portrait (photo by Megan Bean / © Mississippi State University)

Other upcoming bicentennial events that are free and open to the public include:

–Sept. 22, 5-7 p.m., opening reception for the exhibit “Symbols of our State: A Walk Through Mississippi Culture and Industry.” Refreshments will be served. The exhibit will be on display through Nov. 30 at the new Old Main Academic Center located at the intersection of Barr Avenue and George Perry Street. Those interested in scheduling a tour may contact the MSU Welcome Center at 662-325-5198.

–Sept. 30, 10 a.m.-noon, a family-friendly Scan-a-Thon event at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville. Attendees can bring their historic photos depicting Oktibbeha County and Mississippi State to be scanned and digitized. Music and refreshments will be available in the museum’s outdoor pavilion, and the museum also will be open for tours.

–Oct. 19, 6-8 p.m., “Myth-issippi: How Art Makes Place” talk presented by longtime MSU Professor of Art Brent Funderburk in the Colvard Student Union’s first-floor Dawg House. Musicians Caleb Childs and Richard Brown will give live blues performances, and light refreshments will be served. The backdrop for this event will be the Dawg House’s new wall mural highlighting blues music and musicians from Mississippi.

–Oct. 26, 7 p.m., Jeff Harris, MSU assistant Extension research professor with the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology, will give a talk about the history of beekeeping in Mississippi. His presentation will take place in the Clay Lyle Entomology Building, home to the Mississippi State Bug Zoo that will be open for visitors starting at 6:30 p.m.

–Nov. 3, MSU Professor of Geosciences Darrel Schmitz, author of “Roadside Geology of Mississippi,” and George Phillips, curator of paleontology at the Museum of Natural Science in Jackson, will discuss economic geology and important fossil finds in Mississippi. All are welcome to bring a bag lunch for the noon talk “Discoveries in Mississippi Geology and Paleontology,” which will be held in Hilbun Hall, Room 304.

For more event information, contact Amy Moe-Hoffman at 662-325-3915 or amhoffman@geosci.msstate.edu.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Virginia artist, educator turns ‘trash into treasure’ in new MSU exhibition

October 10th, 2017 Comments Off on Virginia artist, educator turns ‘trash into treasure’ in new MSU exhibition

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Coffee lids, plastic utensils and other repurposed materials make for one-of-a-kind creations in a special display Oct. 9-Nov. 11 in Mississippi State University’s Visual Arts Center Gallery.

Free to all, the “How Soon is Now?” exhibition features original sculpture and photographic prints crafted by Richmond, Virginia-based artist Susie Ganch, who serves as associate professor and head of the metal program at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Department of Craft and Material Studies.

Ganch will give an 11 a.m. public talk about her work Thursday [Nov. 9] in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium at Giles Hall, home to MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design. She also will be available at 4 p.m. that day to meet with visitors at the VAC Gallery, located at 808 University Drive on the edge of the Starkville campus. A public reception in Ganch’s honor also will take place at 5-6 p.m. Thursday in the same location. 

Regular gallery hours are 1-5 p.m., Monday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday, as well as by appointment.

A Bachelor of Science and Master of Fine Arts graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Ganch is director of Radical Jewelry Makeover, an international jewelry mining and recycling project that travels across the country and abroad. In addition to California, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Virginia and Wisconsin, Ganch’s work has been on display in Australia, England and Japan.

Visitors of the VAC Gallery exhibition can examine Ganch’s pieces from a distance and then explore the details of each piece up-close.

“From a distance, the ‘waste’ is beautiful—plastic coffee lids appear almost hand-braided, rhythmic and full of movement—yet up-close we notice the coffee stains, dirt and grime indicative of the life of used, discarded garbage,” said Lori Neuenfeldt, MSU art department gallery director.

Ganch’s piece “Drag, 2012” is made from zip ties, nametags, bottle caps, cups and other items tied together to multiple steel rings. Arranged from large to small, the rings lead up to a final ring that can been chained to the wall.

When attached to a person’s wrist like a bracelet, this particular work of art by Ganch “conveys the pull and weight of irresponsible consumerism on an individual and the trail of waste that is left behind or leading the wearer,” Neuenfeldt said.

In addition to the College of Architecture, Art and Design’s Department of Art, the exhibition is made possible through a Community Arts Grant from the Starkville Area Arts Council.

Additional information on Ganch’s campus visit and “How Soon is Now?” exhibition is available from Neuenfeldt at 662-325-2970 or LNeuenfeldt@caad.msstate.edu.

Part of the College of Architecture, Art and Design, MSU’s Department of Art is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. For more, visit www.caad.msstate.edu.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

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