MSU Department of Art gallery director featured in Tupelo newspaper

October 17th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU Department of Art gallery director featured in Tupelo newspaper

Lori Neuenfeldt (photo by Adam Robison via djournal.com)

By Scott Morris | via Daily Journal

Mississippi State University’s Moore Hall houses a roomful of colorful history.

“We have approximately 2,000 objects,” said Lori Neuenfeldt, instructor and gallery director.

Specifically, the MSU Historic Costume and Textiles Collection preserves clothes, shoes and accessories. The oldest item dates back to the 1840s. Some were for everyday wear, others strictly reserved for special occasions.

“We don’t repair. We preserve them and protect them,” Neuenfeldt said. “We don’t try to bring them back to life. We’re more interested in the stories they have to tell.”

Some might not think of fashion as a serious topic, but it touches every aspect of human life. The differences between a store-bought silk dress and a handmade wool dress can speak to class, economic development, regional trends and down-to-earth realities of human existence.

“All of the garments have been worn by people,” Neuenfeldt said. “They have been lived in.”

In the past, clothes were constructed with the future in mind. A man’s coat or a woman’s dress could be passed down to children and siblings. Every ripped seam required needle and thread, rather than a trip to the department store or mall.

“If we get a hole in a shirt, unless it’s a favorite, favorite shirt, we don’t repair it,” Neuenfeldt said. “Victorians passed clothing down for generations and generations.”

When people first hear about a costume collection, they can get the wrong idea.

“They say, ‘Oh, I like the theater,’” she said. “No, costume is the academic term for historical fashion.”

But there has been theatrical interest. Professors and students from the University of Southern Mississippi traveled to Starkville for close-up views.

“They were interested in how they made those 1890s puffy sleeves,” Neuenfeldt said, holding up an example. “You can feel the horse hair in there that makes this leg-of-mutton-style sleeve.”

The visitors wanted to reproduce clothes for the stage. In the search for historical accuracy, they might use hooks and eyes, which were the norm until the zipper came into wide use during the 1930s.

“It was exciting for me to have them come,” Neuenfeldt said, “because they could elaborate on the construction of the clothing.”

The collection is affiliated with MSU’s fashion design and marketing program, so students can inspect and observe.

“It’s helping me learn the history and construction of clothing,” said Water Valley’s Taylor Anne Trusty, a freshman student worker who puts information about the collection into a searchable database. “I’ve learned fashion repeats itself. We tend to just make small changes to clothes over the years.”

Most changes are cosmetic, but others respond to momentous world events.

“During the 1940s,” Neuenfeldt said, “they had restrictions. People had to give their material to the war effort.”

If given the chance to add one piece to the collection, she might ask for a Christian Dior dress from 1947 or ’48. Dior remains a widely known luxury brand, but the time period is equally important when it comes to telling a story through fashion.

“Post World War II, Christian Dior introduced full skirts and used more yards of fabric than had been used in years,” Neuenfeldt said. “A lot of people saw it and said, ‘This is his way of saying the war was over.’”

Dior had his critics. Europe was devastated by the fighting. The end of open warfare didn’t rebuild homes, bring back jobs and return loved ones.

“Some were offended by the use of the fabric because there was so much poverty, and people were spending money on what many would consider frivolous fashion,” she said. “A Dior would symbolize so much about history.”

The collection has the capacity to surprise, as when visitors marvel at how long it would take to lace up an old-school pair of boots.

It also can offend. Several items incorporate fur, which was considered a symbol of status. Men wore their raccoon coats and women had their mink stoles. Babies even got into the act.

“We have a pair of baby slippers that look like rabbits and have rabbit fur on them,” Neuenfeldt said.

The collection focuses on U.S. items, but there are some international objects, including a pair of silk Chinese binding slippers.

“A female of high status would have her feet bound when she was younger,” Neuenfeldt said. “It would prevent them from growing. Small feet were considered beautiful. A lot of times the foot would grow around it. They would not be able to walk very well. They had to be carried.”

That might seem shocking, but Chinese women aren’t the only ones who underwent pain to attain a cultural ideal of beauty. Tight-fitting corsets are mostly in the past, but high heels are still exacting their price, and many women consider the cost worth it.

“Again, it’s a status symbol,” Neuenfeldt said. “Because you’re wearing high heels, you’re not doing hard labor. It sends a message. People will interpret the things you wear.”

The collection room at Moore Hall has undergone renovations in recent years. The carpet was removed and metal shelving was installed. Windows were covered to keep out natural light that could damage fragile fabrics.

“We have electronic devices that monitor the temperature and the humidity,” she said. “We need to maintain 67 degrees to keep the garments happy.”

Though space is limited, there’s room for more. Neuenfeldt isn’t interested in repeating items, but there are holes in MSU’s colorful collection of history. To make a donation or arrange a tour, go to www.historiccostume.msstate.edu.

Visitors will find themselves within one degree of separation between the present day and nearly 180 years of intimate human history.

“Really,” Neuenfeldt said, “you can study everything from clothing.”

Brent Funderburk’s ‘Angelus Vitae’ in noted national showcase

October 14th, 2017 Comments Off on Brent Funderburk’s ‘Angelus Vitae’ in noted national showcase

“Angelus Vitae”, 22″ x 38″, watercolor, 2017 | Brent Funderburk

Brent Funderburk, a long time Mississippi State University professor, has one of his artworks showing in a national juried exhibition for the month of October.

Funderburk’s “Angelus Vitae” a watercolor painting, was chosen by juror Stephen Quiller to be exhibited in the 44th Annual Rocky Mountain National Watermedia Exhibition, showing at the Evergreen Center for the Arts in Evergreen, Co., from Sept. 16 to Oct. 28. A reception for the artists was held on Sept. 16.

Funderburk

Quiller, a noted painter and author, chose 73 works from 549 entries submitted. In his interview with Southwest Art Magazine (September, 2017), Quiller stated that “one of the draws for many artists is the show’s reputation for experimentation.” A color catalog has been produced for the exhibit, which is viewed as one of the best exhibits showcasing watermedia painters in the United States.

According to Funderburk, “Angelus Vitae,” ‘angel of life,’ emerged out of a need to express gratitude for the female – mother; wife; lover; muse. The impulse that runs through the series is an exposition of Her varied appearances, in the still air of close objects, in vast space, and in the intimations of dreams. 

Funderburk, a William L. Giles Distinguished Professor at Mississippi State, has taught there since 1982, serving as department head, senior fine art coordinator and fine art coordinator.

Part of the College of Architecture, Art and Design, MSU’s Department of Art is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. 

See the story at msstate.edu.

Read about it in the Maroon Memo.

 

International photo competition honors Dominic Lippillo

October 13th, 2017 Comments Off on International photo competition honors Dominic Lippillo

“Car Lot” is among 10 images by MSU art faculty member Dominic Lippillo selected for judging in Photolucida’s 2017 Critical Mass portfolio competition. (Photo submitted/courtesy of Dominic Lippillo)

Photographic images by Dominic Lippillo of Mississippi State have been honored among top finalists in Photolucida’s 2017 Critical Mass portfolio competition.

A nonprofit organization based in Portland, Oregon, Photolucida works to “expand, inspire, educate and connect” photography communities around the world. The CM competition involves submissions of 10-image portfolios.

Lippillo, an associate professor in the university’s art department, is among 200 whose entries were selected for final review by an international panel of professionals representing a range of photographic interests.

Lippillo’s portfolio entry comes from a series titled “Stories We Tell Ourselves,” which may be viewed at https://dominic-lippillo.pixpa.com/solowork/stories-we-tell-ourselves1.  

A department member since 2010, he also was honored last year with a Mississippi Arts Commission Fellowship Grant.

“This latest recognition of Dom’s work not only supports the outstanding research reputation of the university, but also helps us continue to push our students to greater excellence,” said Angi E. Bourgeois, department head.

MSU is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program, and the department is makings plans for a master of fine arts degree in photography, Bourgeois said. Lippillo’s achievements “help demonstrate further the strength of our photography concentration,” she added.

Lippillo is a 2005 fine arts/photography graduate of Youngstown (Ohio) State University, with a master’s degree in the major completed at Ohio University. For more biographical information, see www.caad.msstate.edu/art/artdirectory.php.

His photographic and video creations explore aspects of memory, the domestic and space-versus-place, with works now in permanent collections at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas, Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, California, and the universities of Alabama and North Dakota.

MSU’s art department is part of College of Architecture, Art and Design, online at www.caad.msstate.edu.

See the article at msstate.edu.

See the story in the Maroon Memo.

MSU celebrates Magnolia State bicentennial with fall event series

October 10th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU celebrates Magnolia State bicentennial with fall event series

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University is sponsoring a fall-semester series of fun, educational events to commemorate the Magnolia State’s bicentennial.

Jim Giesen–MSU History professor environmental portrait

With support from the Mississippi Humanities Council through the Mississippi Development Authority, the official bicentennial project kicks off Sept. 6 with a 5 p.m. presentation in Mitchell Memorial Library’s third-floor John Grisham Room. Organized by the university’s Museums and Galleries Committee, the free talk “Farming in Mississippi: A Brief History” will be given by MSU Associate Professor of History Jim Giesen.

Also free to all is a Sept. 13 talk titled “Writing Across the Color Line: Conversations, Intersections and Chance Encounters in Mississippi Literary History.” Given by MSU Associate Professor of English and African American Studies Donald Shaffer, the presentation will begin at 5 p.m. in the Grisham Room.

 “The Museums and Galleries Committee is really excited to be putting together this series of events to celebrate the history of Mississippi,” said event coordinator Amy Moe-Hoffman, an instructor in MSU’s Department of Geosciences.

“We began with the idea of showcasing university specimens in a collaborative exhibit,” she continued, “but with the help of a grant from the Mississippi Humanities Council, we were able to expand our programming to include speakers, music, receptions and exhibits that will allow attendees to have a deeper level of engagement with the history of our state.”

Donald Shaffer environmental portrait (photo by Megan Bean / © Mississippi State University)

Other upcoming bicentennial events that are free and open to the public include:

–Sept. 22, 5-7 p.m., opening reception for the exhibit “Symbols of our State: A Walk Through Mississippi Culture and Industry.” Refreshments will be served. The exhibit will be on display through Nov. 30 at the new Old Main Academic Center located at the intersection of Barr Avenue and George Perry Street. Those interested in scheduling a tour may contact the MSU Welcome Center at 662-325-5198.

–Sept. 30, 10 a.m.-noon, a family-friendly Scan-a-Thon event at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville. Attendees can bring their historic photos depicting Oktibbeha County and Mississippi State to be scanned and digitized. Music and refreshments will be available in the museum’s outdoor pavilion, and the museum also will be open for tours.

–Oct. 19, 6-8 p.m., “Myth-issippi: How Art Makes Place” talk presented by longtime MSU Professor of Art Brent Funderburk in the Colvard Student Union’s first-floor Dawg House. Musicians Caleb Childs and Richard Brown will give live blues performances, and light refreshments will be served. The backdrop for this event will be the Dawg House’s new wall mural highlighting blues music and musicians from Mississippi.

–Oct. 26, 7 p.m., Jeff Harris, MSU assistant Extension research professor with the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology, will give a talk about the history of beekeeping in Mississippi. His presentation will take place in the Clay Lyle Entomology Building, home to the Mississippi State Bug Zoo that will be open for visitors starting at 6:30 p.m.

–Nov. 3, MSU Professor of Geosciences Darrel Schmitz, author of “Roadside Geology of Mississippi,” and George Phillips, curator of paleontology at the Museum of Natural Science in Jackson, will discuss economic geology and important fossil finds in Mississippi. All are welcome to bring a bag lunch for the noon talk “Discoveries in Mississippi Geology and Paleontology,” which will be held in Hilbun Hall, Room 304.

For more event information, contact Amy Moe-Hoffman at 662-325-3915 or amhoffman@geosci.msstate.edu.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Department of Art Professor Marita Gootee accepted into international exhibition

September 27th, 2017 Comments Off on Department of Art Professor Marita Gootee accepted into international exhibition

Marita Gootee

By Kesley Brownlee

Songzhuang International Photo Biennale accepted nine of Mississippi State University Department of Art Professor Marita Gootee’s images from her “Sand Shadows Series” for the international call for photo artists/photographers. The theme “Live in This Moment, Return to the Origin” and was held in Songzhuang, Beijing, China. Songzhuang Photo is a major part of the 10th Annual Songzhuang Art Festival. It will be held in the Czech China Contemporary Museum (CCCM) from Sept. 29 to Oct. 13. 

Gootee is one of 37 artists selected to be presented at the Songzhuang International Photo Biennale. Each artist will exhibit nine images. The countries represented are Australia, Belarus, Canada, China, Dubai, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Peru, USA, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Turkey and Ukraine.

There will be an exhibition catalogue exclusive to the 2017 Songzhuang International Photo Biennale. The catalogue will feature a luxurious linen cloth hardcover, high quality paper and full color prints. The catalogue will contain 350 pages, with each artist having four pages. One of the four pages will introduce the artist, and the other three will display the art. 

Songzhuang Photo is a legally registered art organization sponsored by both domestic and international curators/directors, critics, artists, writers and poets in Songzhuang, Beijing. It is based on the idea of a permanent exhibition with changing themes. Through peer support and mutual encouragement, the aim is to promote the artistic development and professional advancement of domestic and international artists/photographers.

Today, Songzhuang is the largest artist community in the world, with more than 8,000 artists living in this art community. Among those are curators/directors, critics, artists, writers and poets. It may also be the most dynamic and vibrant community with some of the best artists worldwide, both famous and unknown. This community of artists, art museums, galleries, exhibitions and art activities is situated in the eastern suburbs of Beijing.

See the news in Maroon Memo.

Haupt assumes new leadership role in MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design

September 14th, 2017 Comments Off on Haupt assumes new leadership role in MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design

Via msstate.edu

A longtime art professor is moving into a new role as interim associate dean for Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art and Design.

Jeffrey Haupt, who previously served as the painting concentration coordinator in the Department of Art, will take on the role of the associate dean. This addition to the college administration is allowing Associate Dean Greg Hall to concentrate his work as interim director of the college’s Building Construction Science program. 

Haupt

“We are fortunate in the College of Architecture, Art and Design to have the type of faculty and administrators that anticipate change and take advantage of opportunity,” said CAAD Dean Jim West. “We had a need to fill the director’s position in the Building Construction Science program, and our current Associate Dean Gregory Hall – who has a construction background – was willing to step into the role. 

“Jeffrey Haupt, one of our senior professors, was also equally willing and wonderfully equipped to assume the associate dean’s responsibilities. Both of these positions will benefit from fresh perspectives and energy,” West added.

Haupt received his Master of Fine Arts from Indiana University and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the Cleveland Institute of Art. He began his teaching career in 1997

Hall

at Indiana University and then taught at the John Waldron Arts Center before joining the Mississippi State art department faculty in 1999 ­as an assistant professor. He was promoted to full professor in 2010.

“I am excited, humbled and grateful to serve CAAD and Mississippi State University in this role,” Haupt said. “For me, it becomes another channel for the pedagogical experience.”

Additional biographical information on Haupt and Hall is available via their “Biography” links at www.caad.msstate.edu/caad/caaddirectory.

For more information on MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design, visit www.caad.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

See the story in Maroon Memo.

Read the story in the Mississippi Business Journal here.

Gootee’s photograph selected for Landscape, Grand and Personal exhibition

August 28th, 2017 Comments Off on Gootee’s photograph selected for Landscape, Grand and Personal exhibition

Marita Gootee | “The Fold”

Via Jim Laird | Maroon Memo

Mississippi State University Department of Art Professor Marita Gootee’s photograph, “The Fold,” was selected by juror Eliot Dudik for the Landscape, Grand and Personal exhibition at the SE Center for Photography. The exhibition will run during September at the center in Greenville, S.C. 

Dudik is a photographic artist, educator and bookmaker exploring the connection between culture, history and politics. His first monograph, ROAD ENDS IN WATER, was published in 2010. In 2012, he was named one of PDN’s 30 New and Emerging Photographers to Watch, and one of The Oxford American magazine’s 100 New Superstars of Southern Art.

“The Fold” is a lumen print of an 8×10 negative contact. The Jill Enfield Guide to Photographic Alternative Processes explains a Lumen as “…prints are made by taking sheets of unexposed black-and-white photo paper and placing objects or negatives on top as if you were going to make a photogram, but instead of using an enlarger you take the paper out into the sun. The results will vary due to exposure times, density of photogram or negative, quality of light and, most importantly, the type of paper.” 

Learn more about the SE Center for Photography at www.sec4p.com.

College of Architecture, Art and Design hosts second annual Jackson Design Camp

August 5th, 2017 Comments Off on College of Architecture, Art and Design hosts second annual Jackson Design Camp

Jackson Design Camp 2017 from CAADatMSU on Vimeo. (Video by Anna Barber)

Mississippi State’s College of Architecture, Art and Design recently hosted its second annual design camp for students from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Mississippi.

Held June 26–30, the five-day summer experience in Jackson had a goal of helping students in the Greater Jackson community develop their interests in architecture, art, community development, design, engineering, planning, social justice and related professional fields.

Students gained knowledge of design tools and media through individual and group workshops focused on design, sketching, printmaking, graphic design, model building, sculpture and construction, among other skills. Collaboration, leadership and communication skills were developed, which will help students increase their self-confidence in these areas, leaders said.

This year’s camp was co-directed by MSU School of Architecture Jackson Center Director Jassen Callender and Department of Art Assistant Professor Suzanne Powney.

“It was a wonderful experience to show design-centered entrepreneurship in Jackson to the students,” said Powney. “The range of presenters and activities really emphasized the many paths they could take in the future.” 

The faculty were joined by four student counselors from the College of Architecture, Art and Design – Kapish Cheema (May 2017 graduate, architecture), De’Andre Gaskin (senior, architecture), Carly Melton (senior, art), Garrett Yelverton (May 2017 graduate, architecture).

The camp experience included a variety of visits throughout downtown Jackson, including a tour of the New Capitol building and the Mississippi Museum of Art. The students also visited studios in downtown Jackson including NunoErin Interactive Furniture, Mississippi Light Collaborative with Jess Dalton, and architect and MSU alumnus Steve Davis’s firm – Canizaro Cawthon Davis.

The students visited Midtown to explore video work at Red Square Productions with Roderick Red, entrepreneurship at Offbeat with Phillip Rollins, art and design at Pearl River Glass Studio with Andrew Young, and furniture design at Reclaimed Miles with Chad Schwarzauer.

Speakers included interior designer and MSU alumnus Cristen Richard, animation and illustrator Assistant Professor Ginnie Hsu from the MSU Department of Art, and coordinator of recruitment activities Tabora Cook from the MSU Office of Admissions and Scholarships.

CAAD Associate Dean and Professor Greg Hall said the camp was designed to help expose students to the wide variety and scope of educational and career opportunities in design fields ranging from architecture to graphic design and interior design to fashion, as well as related fields such as engineering and construction.

“One of our primary goals is to help students form educational and professional goals that they can continue to develop during their high school education, regardless of their eventual career choice,” Hall said.

In addition to being funded in part by a $5,000 grant from the Community Foundation of Greater Jackson and $750 from the ChemFirst/First Mississippi Corporation Charitable Endowment Fund of the Community Foundation of Greater Jackson, the camp is supported by MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design; its School of Architecture and Department of Art; the MSU Holmes Cultural Diversity Center and Office of the Registrar.

“I think one of the most rewarding things about this program is seeing the students develop an interest in design as it applies to everyday life,” said Jane Alexander, president and CEO of the Community Foundation of Greater Jackson. “Not all of them will pursue a career in this path, but they are motivated by the projects they do and the things they see and experience during the week.”

She added, “Once you’ve been exposed to art and architecture, you learn it’s accessible. Knowledge is power, and now these kids have the power of ‘seeing’.”

For additional camp information, contact Hall at 662-325-2509 or ghall@caad.msstate.edu.

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(Images by Anna Barber, De’Andre Gaskin and Christie McNeal)

Professor Alex Bostic’s painting part of national exhibit, wins award

July 7th, 2017 Comments Off on Professor Alex Bostic’s painting part of national exhibit, wins award

“Milayla2” by Alex Bostic

Associate Professor Alexander Bostic’s painting, “Milayla2,” is part of the National Society of Painters in Casein and Acrylic.

The painting also wont the Richeson/Shiva Award for Casein Painting – $300 in art materials.

“The National Society of Painters in Casein and Acrylic was founded to give artists opportunity to exhibit works regardless of style, “school” or subject matter. It is the foremost National Showcase for the two Aquamedia — Casein and Acrylic.”

Professor Alex Bostic’s painting part of Southern Watercolor Society’s 40th Exhibition

July 7th, 2017 Comments Off on Professor Alex Bostic’s painting part of Southern Watercolor Society’s 40th Exhibition

“Camp” by Alexander Bostic

Associate Professor Alexander Bostic’s painting, “Camp,” is featured in the Southern Watercolor Society‘s 40th Exhibition.

A Virtual Tour of Southern Watercolor Society’s 40th Exhibition can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/-u5CXfcD-Co.

“The Southern Watercolor Society, founded in 1975, is a nonprofit corporation formed to elevate the stature of watercolor and educate the public to the significance of watercolor as an important creative permanent painting medium. Membership in the Southern Watercolor Society is open to persons living in the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.”

 

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