Haupt assumes new leadership role in MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design

September 14th, 2017 Comments Off on Haupt assumes new leadership role in MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design

Via msstate.edu

A longtime art professor is moving into a new role as interim associate dean for Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art and Design.

Jeffrey Haupt, who previously served as the painting concentration coordinator in the Department of Art, will take on the role of the associate dean. This addition to the college administration is allowing Associate Dean Greg Hall to concentrate his work as interim director of the college’s Building Construction Science program. 

Haupt

“We are fortunate in the College of Architecture, Art and Design to have the type of faculty and administrators that anticipate change and take advantage of opportunity,” said CAAD Dean Jim West. “We had a need to fill the director’s position in the Building Construction Science program, and our current Associate Dean Gregory Hall – who has a construction background – was willing to step into the role. 

“Jeffrey Haupt, one of our senior professors, was also equally willing and wonderfully equipped to assume the associate dean’s responsibilities. Both of these positions will benefit from fresh perspectives and energy,” West added.

Haupt received his Master of Fine Arts from Indiana University and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the Cleveland Institute of Art. He began his teaching career in 1997

Hall

at Indiana University and then taught at the John Waldron Arts Center before joining the Mississippi State art department faculty in 1999 ­as an assistant professor. He was promoted to full professor in 2010.

“I am excited, humbled and grateful to serve CAAD and Mississippi State University in this role,” Haupt said. “For me, it becomes another channel for the pedagogical experience.”

Additional biographical information on Haupt and Hall is available via their “Biography” links at www.caad.msstate.edu/caad/caaddirectory.

For more information on MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design, visit www.caad.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

See the story in Maroon Memo.

Gootee’s photograph selected for Landscape, Grand and Personal exhibition

August 28th, 2017 Comments Off on Gootee’s photograph selected for Landscape, Grand and Personal exhibition

Marita Gootee | “The Fold”

Via Jim Laird | Maroon Memo

Mississippi State University Department of Art Professor Marita Gootee’s photograph, “The Fold,” was selected by juror Eliot Dudik for the Landscape, Grand and Personal exhibition at the SE Center for Photography. The exhibition will run during September at the center in Greenville, S.C. 

Dudik is a photographic artist, educator and bookmaker exploring the connection between culture, history and politics. His first monograph, ROAD ENDS IN WATER, was published in 2010. In 2012, he was named one of PDN’s 30 New and Emerging Photographers to Watch, and one of The Oxford American magazine’s 100 New Superstars of Southern Art.

“The Fold” is a lumen print of an 8×10 negative contact. The Jill Enfield Guide to Photographic Alternative Processes explains a Lumen as “…prints are made by taking sheets of unexposed black-and-white photo paper and placing objects or negatives on top as if you were going to make a photogram, but instead of using an enlarger you take the paper out into the sun. The results will vary due to exposure times, density of photogram or negative, quality of light and, most importantly, the type of paper.” 

Learn more about the SE Center for Photography at www.sec4p.com.

College of Architecture, Art and Design hosts second annual Jackson Design Camp

August 5th, 2017 Comments Off on College of Architecture, Art and Design hosts second annual Jackson Design Camp

Jackson Design Camp 2017 from CAADatMSU on Vimeo. (Video by Anna Barber)

Mississippi State’s College of Architecture, Art and Design recently hosted its second annual design camp for students from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Mississippi.

Held June 26–30, the five-day summer experience in Jackson had a goal of helping students in the Greater Jackson community develop their interests in architecture, art, community development, design, engineering, planning, social justice and related professional fields.

Students gained knowledge of design tools and media through individual and group workshops focused on design, sketching, printmaking, graphic design, model building, sculpture and construction, among other skills. Collaboration, leadership and communication skills were developed, which will help students increase their self-confidence in these areas, leaders said.

This year’s camp was co-directed by MSU School of Architecture Jackson Center Director Jassen Callender and Department of Art Assistant Professor Suzanne Powney.

“It was a wonderful experience to show design-centered entrepreneurship in Jackson to the students,” said Powney. “The range of presenters and activities really emphasized the many paths they could take in the future.” 

The faculty were joined by four student counselors from the College of Architecture, Art and Design – Kapish Cheema (May 2017 graduate, architecture), De’Andre Gaskin (senior, architecture), Carly Melton (senior, art), Garrett Yelverton (May 2017 graduate, architecture).

The camp experience included a variety of visits throughout downtown Jackson, including a tour of the New Capitol building and the Mississippi Museum of Art. The students also visited studios in downtown Jackson including NunoErin Interactive Furniture, Mississippi Light Collaborative with Jess Dalton, and architect and MSU alumnus Steve Davis’s firm – Canizaro Cawthon Davis.

The students visited Midtown to explore video work at Red Square Productions with Roderick Red, entrepreneurship at Offbeat with Phillip Rollins, art and design at Pearl River Glass Studio with Andrew Young, and furniture design at Reclaimed Miles with Chad Schwarzauer.

Speakers included interior designer and MSU alumnus Cristen Richard, animation and illustrator Assistant Professor Ginnie Hsu from the MSU Department of Art, and coordinator of recruitment activities Tabora Cook from the MSU Office of Admissions and Scholarships.

CAAD Associate Dean and Professor Greg Hall said the camp was designed to help expose students to the wide variety and scope of educational and career opportunities in design fields ranging from architecture to graphic design and interior design to fashion, as well as related fields such as engineering and construction.

“One of our primary goals is to help students form educational and professional goals that they can continue to develop during their high school education, regardless of their eventual career choice,” Hall said.

In addition to being funded in part by a $5,000 grant from the Community Foundation of Greater Jackson and $750 from the ChemFirst/First Mississippi Corporation Charitable Endowment Fund of the Community Foundation of Greater Jackson, the camp is supported by MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design; its School of Architecture and Department of Art; the MSU Holmes Cultural Diversity Center and Office of the Registrar.

“I think one of the most rewarding things about this program is seeing the students develop an interest in design as it applies to everyday life,” said Jane Alexander, president and CEO of the Community Foundation of Greater Jackson. “Not all of them will pursue a career in this path, but they are motivated by the projects they do and the things they see and experience during the week.”

She added, “Once you’ve been exposed to art and architecture, you learn it’s accessible. Knowledge is power, and now these kids have the power of ‘seeing’.”

For additional camp information, contact Hall at 662-325-2509 or ghall@caad.msstate.edu.

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(Images by Anna Barber, De’Andre Gaskin and Christie McNeal)

Professor Alex Bostic’s painting part of national exhibit, wins award

July 7th, 2017 Comments Off on Professor Alex Bostic’s painting part of national exhibit, wins award

“Milayla2” by Alex Bostic

Associate Professor Alexander Bostic’s painting, “Milayla2,” is part of the National Society of Painters in Casein and Acrylic.

The painting also wont the Richeson/Shiva Award for Casein Painting – $300 in art materials.

“The National Society of Painters in Casein and Acrylic was founded to give artists opportunity to exhibit works regardless of style, “school” or subject matter. It is the foremost National Showcase for the two Aquamedia — Casein and Acrylic.”

Professor Alex Bostic’s painting part of Southern Watercolor Society’s 40th Exhibition

July 7th, 2017 Comments Off on Professor Alex Bostic’s painting part of Southern Watercolor Society’s 40th Exhibition

“Camp” by Alexander Bostic

Associate Professor Alexander Bostic’s painting, “Camp,” is featured in the Southern Watercolor Society‘s 40th Exhibition.

A Virtual Tour of Southern Watercolor Society’s 40th Exhibition can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/-u5CXfcD-Co.

“The Southern Watercolor Society, founded in 1975, is a nonprofit corporation formed to elevate the stature of watercolor and educate the public to the significance of watercolor as an important creative permanent painting medium. Membership in the Southern Watercolor Society is open to persons living in the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.”

 

Department of Art wraps up annual summer camp

June 26th, 2017 Comments Off on Department of Art wraps up annual summer camp

Images by Matthew Gordon

Fourteen campers ages sixteen and up were a part of this summer’s INvision art camp at Mississippi State University.

From June 12-16, students participated in workshops across all concentrations led by art professors and had the chance to interact with current art students.

  • Bookbinding
    • Campers started the week learning how to bind a sketchbook. They kept the book, which they used throughout the camp to draw and journal their experiences. 
  • Sculpture
    • The group made plaster casts of their hands, and learned to steam-bend wood and braze small pieces of metal together.
  • Ceramics
    • Campers learned to throw pottery on the wheel and do a hand building project.  They also got to see their pots fired in a Raku firing.
  • Drawing
    • This workshop taught basic drawing rules and skills to help with composition.
  • Photography
    • The campers learned about different studio lighting techniques and how photographers use lighting to take studio portraits.  The campers then got to take turns practicing their technique – both modeling and taking portraits.
  • Graphic Design
    • Campers were excited to get to design their own t-shirt for the camp.  Its was a collaborative effort, combining individual drawings into one for the final design.

On the final day of the camp, students installed their work from the week at the Visual Arts Center and had a reception for parents and visitors.

For more about the annual summer camp, visit: caad.msstate.edu/in-vision, or contact us at in-vision@caad.msstate.edu or 662-325-6900.

‘Who, What, Wear?’ collaborative exhibition features works by MSU students

June 23rd, 2017 Comments Off on ‘Who, What, Wear?’ collaborative exhibition features works by MSU students

MSU senior art/fine arts major Dionicio D. “Dion” Coleman of Rex, Georgia, presents his research at the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art in Laurel while standing next to an original fashion design by Gabrielle Martinez, an MSU senior fashion design and merchandising/design and product development major from Byhalia. Martinez’s design was inspired by Benjamin West’s oil painting “J. Fall,” c. 1765–1770. (Submitted photo/courtesy of Phyllis Bell Miller)

On display through Oct. 22 at the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art in Laurel, the “Who What Wear?” collaborative exhibition features costume recreations and original designs displayed next to works of art and research by students from Mississippi State and the University of Southern Mississippi. Under the direction of Phyllis Bell Miller, retiring MSU professor of fashion design merchandising, far left, and Lori Neuenfeldt, MSU art instructor and gallery director, far right, the students include, from left to right, Neshelle Gilbert, Alicia Lemons, Candace Wheeler, Kristen Miller-Zohn, USM student Jacquelyn Loy, Heather Pace, Jennifer McFadden, USM costume shop supervisor Kelly James-Penot, Mackenzie Dunn, Dion Coleman, Kelly Byrd, Katye Drew and Haylee Upton. (Submitted photo/courtesy of Charles Freeman)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Works representing the collaborative efforts of current and former Mississippi State art, fashion design and merchandising, and theatre students are on display through Oct. 22 at the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art in Laurel.

Featuring costume recreations and original designs, the “Who, What, Wear?” exhibition also showcases works of art and research by students from MSU’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; College of Architecture, Art and Design; and College of Arts and Sciences, as well as students from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Lori Neuenfeldt, MSU art instructor and gallery director, said last year, she was approached by Kristen Miller-Zohn, curator at the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art. Miller-Zohn proposed the idea for a collaborative exhibition featuring the recreation of garments seen in works of art at the museum.

“For this exhibit, we sought to involve professionals and students in different fields including art, fashion design and theatre,” Neuenfeldt said. “This idea led to the creation of a special topics course at Mississippi State titled ‘Understanding Fashion in Art’ that combines my interests in the overlapping of art and clothing history.”

Neuenfeldt taught the “Understanding Fashion in Art” course this past spring, but the work featured in the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art exhibition is that of students who were enrolled in her 2016 spring semester course.

As part of the 2016 spring semester “Understanding Fashion in Art” course, 30 undergraduate students investigated different ways clothing and accessories are used to communicate ideas of power, gender, wealth and wisdom through works of art from ancient to modern periods.

Throughout the semester, the students conducted research and developed sketches and dossiers on pieces from the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art’s permanent collection.

“Students interpreted the way clothing functions in specific pieces from the museum’s permanent collection,” Neuenfeldt said. “This was no easy task, but they showed me that they were eager for the opportunity to access the collection, study the objects and provide information to the museum.”

MSU art students Alex Cayson, Jennifer McFadden, Haylee Upton, Dion Coleman and Katye Drew passed their research on to fashion design and merchandising majors Neshelle Gilbert, Gabrielle Martinez and Alicia Lemons, who were enrolled in MSU Professor Phyllis Bell Miller’s fall 2016 intermediate construction course. Miller’s students used the research and images as inspiration for new fashion designs, Neuenfeldt said.

Additionally, former MSU communication/theatre major Mackenzie Dunn and Kelly James-Penot, costume shop supervisor at the University of Southern Mississippi, produced historical recreations that are displayed next to paintings from the Lauren Rogers museum’s permanent collection. Dunn created a 19th-century folk costume from the Swiss Canton of Bern, while James-Penot created an 18th-century style “robe á la française.”

Neuenfeldt said this yearlong project is “an exciting example of how artwork can inspire collaborations across research fields and educational institutions.”

“The Mississippi State University Department of Art is happy to partner with the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art and the University of Southern Mississippi for this special project,” she said. “An investigation of fashion and costume is a fascinating way to explore works of art and culture, and it is exciting to see how the work of our students is being used to actively engage visitors of the museum.”

For more exhibit information, visit www.lrma.org/exhibition/who-what-wear or contact Neuenfeldt at 662-325-2973 or LNeuenfeldt@caad.msstate.edu.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Maroon Institute for Writing Excellence honors faculty graduates at MSU

June 1st, 2017 Comments Off on Maroon Institute for Writing Excellence honors faculty graduates at MSU

More than a dozen MSU faculty members are new graduates of a summer program designed to help them better incorporate writing strategies into class assignments. They include (front, l-r) Joanne Beriswill, Brian Counterman, Martha Barton, Kenya McKinley, Kim Smith and Gail Kopetz; (back, l-r) LaShan Simpson, Lesley Strawderman, Christine Cord, Jeffrey Haupt, Robert Green and Byron Williams. Not pictured is Holli Seitz. (Photo by Megan Bean)

By Allison Matthews | Mississippi State University

More than a dozen Mississippi State faculty members are new graduates of the university’s Maroon Institute for Writing Excellence program.

Now in its fifth year, the three-week intensive institute trains teachers from a variety of university departments to modify course syllabi to incorporate more writing-to-learn strategies into class assignments.

The professional development program is part of “Maroon & Write,” the university’s quality enhancement plan—QEP, for short—to improve undergraduate writing and learning skills across all colleges, curricula and class levels. The QEP is required to maintain accreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

As part of the 30-plus hour workshop held this month, participants read a variety of theory-related literature selections and took part in activities such as journaling, free-writing, peer-evaluation and reflective essay development. They will incorporate many of the activities they learned into the respective courses they teach throughout the academic year.

In addition to teaching one course that incorporates writing-to-learn techniques and a formal writing component, MIWE graduates will continue interacting with the QEP staff throughout the school year for ongoing support.

“We ask a lot of our faculty participants. They learn new strategies for incorporating writing in their classes and they challenge their pre-existing ideas about how writing assignments and student engagement can and should work in their classes,” said Deborah Lee, who co-directs the Maroon & Write QEP with English Instructor Ann Spurlock. “The faculty who are chosen for participation in the MIWE are committed to enhancing their skills as a teacher and care passionately about their students’ success.”

“Working with such dedicated faculty is truly an honor,” Lee added.

LaShan Simpson, assistant professor of agricultural and biological engineering, will apply enhanced writing-to-learn concepts this fall in her biomedical materials course for upperclassmen.

“A lot of classes already have writing components, such as the term paper, but I’ve learned to incorporate writing in small instances earlier in the semester,” Simpson said.

She explained that the concept of “scaffolding writing” allows students to start out with smaller writing assignments and build up to larger papers, gaining feedback for drafts along the way.

“This program has put me back in the role of student, and I’ve been able to test out the free writing and informal writing myself before having my students do it this fall,” she said.

Robert Green, undergraduate coordinator for the Bagley College of Engineering, said he has always given writing assignments as part of his engineering administration course, but he has been interested in making assignments more effective.

“This year my students will be working on a white paper, similar to what professionals would prepare for their bosses,” he said.

In recognition of their participation, graduates received a commemorative framed certificate, T-shirt and portfolio embossed with the Maroon and Write program’s logo.

In addition to Simpson and Green, this year’s MIWE summer graduates and the writing-to-learn courses they’ll be teaching during the upcoming academic year include (alphabetically):

—Martha Barton, instructor of biological sciences teaching special topics in biological sciences.

—Joanne Beriswill, assistant professor of instructional systems and workforce development teaching graphics and web design.

—Christine Cord, postdoctoral associate in food science, nutrition and health promotion teaching food law.

—Brian Counterman, associate professor of biological sciences teaching population genetics.

—Jeffrey Haupt, professor of art teaching painting survey.

—Gail Kopetz, instructor of music teaching foundations of music education.

—Kenya McKinley, assistant professor of sociology teaching social work with communities and organizations.

—Holli Seitz, assistant professor of communication teaching elements of persuasion.

—Kim Smith, instructor of curriculum, instruction and special education teaching middle level literacy.

—Lesley Strawderman, associate professor of industrial and systems engineering teaching industrial ergonomics.

—Byron Williams, assistant professor of computer science and engineering teaching software architecture and design paradigms.

Learn more about MIWE and Maroon and Write QEP at www.qep.msstate.edu, www.facebook.com/QEPMSU and www.twitter.com/MSUQEP.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu

See the story in The Starkville Daily News.

CAAD faculty, staff honored at annual ‘Years of Service Ceremony’

May 9th, 2017 Comments Off on CAAD faculty, staff honored at annual ‘Years of Service Ceremony’


(photos via Brent Funderburk)

The annual Mississippi State University Division of Academic Affairs Years of Service Ceremony was held on Mon., May 8 at 3 p.m. in the Foster Ballroom of the Colvard Student Union.

Provost and Executive Vice President Judy Bonner welcomed everyone before Robert Wolverton from the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures presented his reflections on university service. Wolverton was also being honored for 40 years of service.

The event ended with recognition of faculty and staff for years of service, ranging from five to 50 years, and a reception.

CAAD faculty and staff recognized include:

Five Years:
Assistant Professor Neil Callander (art)
Assistant Professor Tom Leathem (building construction science)
Assistant Professor Greg Martin (art)
Assistant Professor Emily McGlohn (architecture)
Christie McNeal, communications specialist (CAAD)
Lori Neuenfeldt, gallery director (art)

10 Years:
Pandora Prater, director’s assistant (architecture)
Assistant Clinical Professor Justin Taylor (architecture)
Christina Vanderberg, administrative assistant (art)

20 Years:
Amy Massey, administrative assistant (interior design)

30 Years:
Jane Lewis, dean’s assistant (CAAD)
Professor and Printmaking Coordinator Linda Seckinger (art)

35 Years:
William L. Giles Distinguished Professor and Fine Arts Thesis Coordinator Brent Funderburk (art)

EPA raingarden ribbon cutting marks observation of Earth Day at MSU

April 27th, 2017 Comments Off on EPA raingarden ribbon cutting marks observation of Earth Day at MSU


(Photos by Megan Bean | Mississippi State University)By Vanessa Beeson | Mississippi State University

Three cross-college departments commemorated a new raingarden at the university with a ribbon cutting Friday [April 21] in observation of Earth Day. The raingarden is located in the courtyard of the landscape architecture facility on the Starkville campus.

Landscape architecture students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences built the garden, funded by a $20,000 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to create a green infrastructure training and demonstration project. Those also contributing to the project include graphic design and engineering students, as well as the MSU facilities management department.

Mississippi State University President Mark E. Keenum spoke about the importance of sustainability at the ceremony.

“I am so pleased to see so many students who took an active role in leading this effort to make a difference. Having a wonderful raingarden to demonstrate the sustainability of water is something we are all going to learn from for years to come,” Keenum said. “Our university must address critical challenges like this for the future and instill in our younger generations knowledge of how to develop innovative solutions.”

Cory Gallo, associate professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture, said the raingarden manages one-fourth of the building’s rainwater runoff, but the project’s main purpose is to serve as an educational showpiece that teaches students, faculty and the broader community about green infrastructure technologies.

“The focus of this is really about education. This is the most comprehensive raingarden demonstration project in Mississippi and perhaps even in the Southeast. I don’t know of any that communicate what a raingarden does as well as this one,” Gallo said.

The raingarden’s focal piece is a 2,000 gallon cistern that collects rainwater and directs excess water into a 1,500-square-foot bioretention basin where it is managed with soil and plants. The raingarden is a sustainable water management demonstration in three steps — conveyance, storage and management. As water comes off the roof, it goes into the cistern for storage and then into the garden. Once in the garden, the water is cooled, filtered, absorbed and delayed.

Gallo explained the effects of the process.

“If you come here a day or two after it rains, you’ll hear water making its way into the basin because that’s how much water flow has been slowed down. When there is less water, it becomes much slower and takes more time, and it’s cleaner and cooler as it comes through. It’s an audible experience,” he said.

In previous semesters, landscape architecture students installed the basin in addition to surrounding benches. Part of that previous work included collaboration with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Bagley College of Engineering. Civil engineering students completed water quality testing prior to construction as part of the preliminary work.

“This is one of the most amazing projects where landscape architects, graphic designers and civil engineers worked together marching toward environmental sustainability. It is a win-win situation for all involved,” said Veera Gnaneswar Gude, assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environment Engineering.

Graphic design students from the College of Architecture, Art and Design also worked alongside landscape architecture students to develop informational graphics to communicate the project’s purpose in an effective, concise manner.

Both landscape architecture and graphic design students enrolled in a cross-college collaborative course were tasked with designing, creating and installing the cistern; building out the garden; and developing, creating and implementing the demonstration component.

Suzanne Powney, assistant professor in the Department of Art, discussed how that hands-on collaboration, especially the opportunity for graphic design students to assist in the construction of the garden, resulted in a better design. She said while the work was challenging at times, the students took it in stride and did an incredible job.

“All of the students worked really hard. I am very proud of them,” she said. “This is a permanent structure they can come back to years in the future and say, ‘I built this.’”

In addition to Friday’s ribbon cutting, students also participated in a ceremonial first planting in the new MSU Community Garden immediately adjacent to the raingarden. Graphic design students contributed to this garden with a wall graphic, numbering system on the planters and educational graphic explaining when to plant various crops.

For more information, visit MSU’s Department of Landscape Architecture online at lalc.msstate.edu; the College of Architecture, Art and Design at caad.msstate.edu; and the Bagley College of Engineering at bagley.msstate.edu. The Water Resources Research Institute, housed at Mississippi State, facilitated the raingarden project’s grant and budget.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

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