Dominic Lippillo featured on MPB ‘Arts Hour’

May 23rd, 2018 Comments Off on Dominic Lippillo featured on MPB ‘Arts Hour’

Mississippi State University Department of Art Associate Professor Dominic Lippillo was featured on Mississippi Public Broadcasting: Think Radio’s ‘Mississippi Arts Hour’ on April 8th.

The interview has been posted on the MPB website, and it can be streamed here.

Via the site: “Turry Flucker speaks with Dominic Lippillo. Dominic is among nine visual artists from around the region receiving a State Fellowship from Atlanta, Georgia-based and MAC‘s regional partner South Arts. In addition to Mississippi, this year’s recipients represent Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.   Dominic Lippillo’s work questions the role of photography by making digitally constructed images that address notions of space versus place, memory, and experience. Selections of his collaborative work are included in the permanent collections of The Museum of Photographic Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; and the University of North Dakota. His work has been published in Don’t Take Pictures, Exposure, Daily Serving, and The Eye of Photography.”

Alex Bostic featured in ‘Artist Spotlight’

May 22nd, 2018 Comments Off on Alex Bostic featured in ‘Artist Spotlight’

“Dupree” by Alexander Bostic

By Dianne Poston Owens | SCNOW Morning News

LAKE CITY, S.C. – Though Alex Bostic left Bennettsville with his family when he was 4, and his time in the northeast became essential to his becoming the artist he is today, he still has cousins, namely Diane and Caroline, to whom he gives a shoutout in his hometown.

Now an art professor at Mississippi State University and living in Starkville, Mississippi, Bostic, who entered an oil painting of his son “Dupree” in this year’s ArtFields competition, credits his time spent in the Pratt Institute art school and his seventh-grade art teacher, Ellen Kuenzel, with helping him achieve his fine artist status.

In Brooklyn Heights, Bostic said, Kuenzel would give me him lessons and talk to him about art.

“I grew up in Brooklyn, and my art teacher, Ellen, mentored me. … To this day I talk to her at least twice a week,” Botic said. “All through my career from seventh grade until now, we have talked. I had lessons on Saturdays, and on Sundays she took me to galleries. … I understood art way better than a seventh-grader should.

“I think that’s why I teach.”

Pratt’s programs are ranked among the best in the nation, with its faculty and alumni among the most renowned artists, designers and scholars in their fields.

Bostic is an illustrator and fine artist. In additional to being on the Mississippi State faculty, he has worked at the Kansas City Art Institute, Woodburry University, Pratt Institute and Virginia Commonwealth University.

After getting his bachelor of fine arts from Pratt, he earned his master of arts degree from Syracuse University and became a studio artist, working in Kansas City, Missouri; Los Angeles; and New York City.

In 2015, Bostic made it to the second round of the ArtFields’ Portrait Artist Competition.

His brother accompanied him on his trip, and the two agreed that Lake City, and ArtFields, was a venue and competition worth revisiting.

“I visited all the works on display and was interested in entering,” Bostic says. “There was outstanding work, and I wanted to be a part of it. When the opportunity came [to enter his work], I took it.”

Bostic said he had just finished the piece “Dupree” and believes it is a good representation of the work he does, and it offers a positive look at a good kid. The painting has been in a show in Chicago and elsewhere.

Bostic said his son, Dupree, is excited that the painting has had its own life.

“He’s in New York City right now, living there,” Bostic said, adding that the painting was done while he helped his son move to the city for a new job. He particularly likes the “determined kind of look on his face.”

It was an important time for the two, Bostic said.

Outside of his art, Bostic collects toys.

“I have a big toy collection,” he said.

His newest one is a figurine of the Incredible Hulk that his son sent to him.

“I’ve got vintage ones, but I like the current ones, too,” Bostic said.

As an educator for the past 34 years, Bostic said he believes in the craft of art, and he wants to “spread that kind of energy all over as much as I can.” His favorite enjoyment is teaching non-art students to draw, he said.

Department of Art celebrates 50th anniversary

May 22nd, 2018 Comments Off on Department of Art celebrates 50th anniversary

Established in 1968, Mississippi State’s Department of Art celebrated its 50th Anniversary this academic year with a series of events:

“Statements: 50 Years of Making”
Art alumni exhibition

Alumni and Student Networking Event
Cullis Wade Depot Art Gallery

Alumni Reception at the M-Club
Honoring retiring Professor Brent Funderburk

Alumni Panel: “Creative Education to Creative Careers”
Part of the Eric and Ginna Yonge Lecture Series

Tailgate and Monster Drawing Rally

Longtime MSU art professor to retire

April 30th, 2018 Comments Off on Longtime MSU art professor to retire

Brent Funderburk – MSU Art Professor, painting in his home studio.
(photo by Megan Bean / © Mississippi State University)

Charlie Benton | Starkville Daily News

After 36 years teaching art at Mississippi State University and 40 years total in academia, Brent Funderburk will retire from the university on May 22, his 66th birthday.

Funderburk came to MSU as a painting teacher, after time spent painting in North Carolina. Prior to coming to MSU, Funderburk also served on the ar faculties of Nebraska Wesleyan University and East Carolina University, his alma mater. In addition to his teaching and painting, Funderburk is also regarded as an expert on Mississippi Gulf Coast artist Walter Inglis Anderson. While a student at ECU, he studied under painters Edward Reep and Paul Hartley.

“I think 40 years is a good number, and I really desire to be a painter full-time,” Funderburk said.

Despite his desire to paint full-time, Funderburk said he would miss being able to support students on their journey and watch them grow as artists.

“I love the fact that as a visual artist, you can actually physically see young people grow, because we have visual evidence,” Funderburk said. “In other words, their souls are on the outside. They can look whatever way they want to look, but you can’t hide the fact that in visual art, your innards are going to be seen.”

Funderburk expressed a desire to stay young in his retirement as he painted and travelled. He said he was able to stay young as a professor, by spending so much time around college students.

“I’ve just been hanging out with 20-year-olds for 40 years, so I’m going to miss that,” Funderburk said. “I am not going to be the guy at the Hardee’s every morning with the other old farts. That’s not me. I love them. I’ll wave at them as I pass by going to the art store, but I’m going to do 20-year-old stuff, living the life, working really hard painting a lot.”

Funderburk first became interested in art growing up with his twin brother in Charlotte, North Carolina in the 1950s and 1960s. He said his parents provided him and his brother with art supplies to give them something constructive to do, and keep them out of trouble.

“My parents always provided us with paper, crayons, art supplies, and we somehow were absorbed throughout almost all of our childhood with playing together and making things,” Funderburk said. “It was something natural that we did. My brother now is a very successful architect.”

As he grew up and went to art school, Funderburk became interested in designing album covers for bands popular during the time period. However, as he prepared to graduate, cassette tapes became the norm.

“Sad little tiny things that fall apart easily, and really an affront to artists,” Funderburk said.

While he was figuring out his next step as he was finishing his Master of Fine Arts degree, someone told Funderburk he might make a good teacher. He then started applying to academic positions in 1978, ending up at NWU.

After a few years at NWU, Funderburk left, and was living and painting in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains. However, he began to miss teaching, and again started searching for academic positions.

“I found that I could not as easily teach squirrels and snakes,” Funderburk said. “The classes didn’t go very well with those snails and turtles and frogs. I missed it, so I applied for the only job that I’ve ever seen in any job search at the university level, where the name of the position was ‘watercolor artist.’ Almost always it’s ‘painter,’ or ‘drawing’ at a university position, something like that, but this was for a watercolor painter, so that was unique.”

Funderburk said the location in Mississippi piqued his interest a little, because of his prior knowledge of Walter Anderson.

“The fact that Mississippi State very particularly wanted an academic watercolor painter, was very attractive to me,” Funderburk said.
Funderburk plans to stay in Starkville after he retires.

“My wife, Debby, teaches dance, and has taught dance here for 25 years at State, and she is still teaching,” Funderburk said. “We’ll travel a lot, and I’ll be working a lot, and I’ll show my work a lot across the country and internationally. It’s a great college town, a great place for a headquarters to be an artist in the 21st century.”

Funderburk described his work as being inspired by nature, but said he didn’t consider himself a landscape painter. The last class he will teach at MSU will be a Walter Anderson course, involving making trips to the Mississippi barrier islands to paint as Anderson once did.

A public reception for Funderburk will be held by the MSU College of Architecture, Art and Design in the Dawg House at the Colvard Student Union on May 2 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

“I’m thankful to God for being at Mississippi State, and for everyone who’s been with me along the way,” Funderburk said.

Read more in the Maroon Memo.

Lippillo featured in international photography magazine

April 9th, 2018 Comments Off on Lippillo featured in international photography magazine

A faculty member in Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art and Design was recently featured in an international photography magazine.

Department of Art Associate Professor Dominic Lippillo’s portfolio from his series “Stories We Tell Ourselves” was showcased in “Don’t Take Pictures,” along with an article written by Roger Thompson, senior editor for the magazine and professor at Stony Brook University.

The feature can be found in issue #10, and his portfolio is currently featured online: http://www.donttakepictures.com.

“Lippillo aims to capture a landscape that, as he says, ‘can be anywhere,’ and part of the success of the photographs is their ability to evoke familiarity despite their generic Americana appearance,” says Thompson in the article.

“Don’t Take Pictures” is published in print twice a year — in March and September — along with regular online articles.

The magazine was founded as a publication of The Kiernan Gallery and now functions independently “to introduce art lovers, dog lovers, cat lovers, hipsters, oldsters, and collectors to artists who are on the move.”

An MSU faculty member since 2010, Lippillo earned his bachelor’s in photography from Youngstown State University in 2005 and master’s in photography from Ohio University in 2009. Digital photography and photography survey are among courses Lippillo has taught at MSU.

Lippillo’s solo and collaborative work addresses ideas pertaining to memory, space and place, and vernacular photographic images. His photographs are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Photographic Art; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and universities of Alabama and North Dakota.

His work also has been published in the journal “Exposure” and in the supplement of images accompanying Bruce Warren’s textbook “Photography: The Concise Guide” (2nd Edition, March 2011). Lippillo’s other honors include a 2013 MSU Faculty Research Award, 2016 Mississippi Arts Commission Fellowship and 2018 South Arts Fellowship. For more, visit https://dominic-lippillo.pixpa.com.

Celebrating its 50th year, MSU’s Department of Art is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. Learn more at www.caad.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Watercolor paintings garner national, global recognition for MSU’s Funderburk

March 29th, 2018 Comments Off on Watercolor paintings garner national, global recognition for MSU’s Funderburk

MSU art professor Brent Funderburk works on a watercolor painting in the studio at his Starkville home. (Photo by Megan Bean)

Mississippi State University William L. Giles Distinguished Professor of Art Brent Funderburk stands with one of his award-winning watercolor paintings, “Oaxaca.” Funderburk is retiring this May after nearly 36 years at MSU. (Photo submitted)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Colorful creations by Mississippi State University’s William L. Giles Distinguished Professor of Art are featured this spring in multiple national and international exhibitions.

Brent Funderburk, a longtime faculty member and former head of the MSU College of Architecture, Art and Design’s Department of Art, received a “Judge’s Recognition Award” in the recent 11th Biennial National Art Exhibit at the Visual Arts Center in Punta Gorda, Florida.

His watercolor work “Today” was selected by juror Steven J. Levin as one of 136 works out of 547 entries from 35 states and four countries. Biennial prizes totaled nearly $8,000 in a show considered one of the nation’s most prestigious exhibitions. Levin noted in the exhibition awards program that Funderburk’s work presented “an unusual concept enhanced by wonderfully vibrant color.”

Also, Funderburk’s painting “Montem Somnia” will appear in the upcoming 42nd Annual Transparent Watercolor Society of America’s National Exhibition. Chosen by juror John Salminen, the work will be available for viewing May 5-Aug. 5 at the Kenosha Public Museum in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

One of more than 7,100 submitted entries, Funderburk’s watercolor painting “Oaxaca” is a Still Life/Interiors Award recipient for The Artist’s Magazine 34th Annual Art Competition.  Selected by juror Jaye Schlesinger, the piece appears with 42 others in the March 2018 issue and will be featured in future issues of the international publication.

Another of Funderburk’s watercolor paintings “Passiflora” will be featured in the National Watercolor Society’s 2018 Member’s Exhibition at the NWS Gallery in San Pedro, California. The jury-selected piece can be seen in the exhibition that runs from May 3-June 30 with a reception and awards ceremony on May 5. Juror for the show is Dreamworks Animation artist/designer Mike Hernandez.

A North Carolina native, Funderburk is retiring this May after nearly 36 years at MSU. Over the decades, he has been honored by the university with the John Grisham Faculty Excellence, Burlington Northern Teaching Excellence and Ralph E. Powe Research Excellence awards. He also is a 2016 Southeastern Conference Faculty Achievement Award recipient.

Funderburk, a fine arts graduate of East Carolina University, also has served as the art department’s fine-arts thesis coordinator. Courses he has taught include painting survey, watercolor, watermedia, senior thesis and advanced studio.

In 2010, Funderburk was named official artist for the Jackson-based USA International Ballet Competition. For additional biographical information, visit www.brentfunderburk.com.

Celebrating its 50th year, MSU’s Department of Art is the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. For more, visit www.caad.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Check out the story in the university’s Maroon Memo.

Opera performance to showcase Department of Art illustrations

March 27th, 2018 Comments Off on Opera performance to showcase Department of Art illustrations

On April 6 and 7, the Mississippi State University Opera Workshop program is hosting family-friendly performances of scenes from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s operas. (Original illustration by Ginnie Hsu)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Under the direction of internationally acclaimed soprano Roza Tulyaganova, the Mississippi State University Opera Workshop is hosting two performances of scenes from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s operas.

The family-friendly performances take place at 7:30 p.m. April 6 and 7 at First United Methodist Church’s Connection Center. General admission tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children and MSU students with ID. Tickets may be purchased in advance by contacting Cathy Evans in the Department of Music at 662-325-3070.

The downtown Connection Center is located a short distance east of the church at the intersection of East Lampkin and South Washington streets in Starkville.

Considered by many to be some of the greatest vocal compositions, Mozart’s operas touch on a wide variety of topics—love, loss, intrigue, class conflict and passion—and are as relevant today as when they were written. Combining scenes from four of Mozart’s major operas, “Dreaming of Mozart” tells the story of two young people who, after getting lost in the woods and falling asleep, wake up to find themselves within Mozart’s operas.

“Roza Tulyaganova has created a story that connects the scenes in a way that allows the audience to enjoy and follow the story without knowing the synopses of the operas themselves,” said Ryan Landis, MSU voice instructor. “Originally written for orchestra, this production will feature the MSU Faculty Wind Quintet.”

Throughout the program, original illustrations by students in MSU’s Department of Art will be projected on a screen behind the performers. The illustrations were completed under the guidance of MSU Assistant Professor Shih  “Ginnie” Hsu.

A native of Uzbekistan, Tulyaganova is an MSU assistant professor of voice and opera. The Opera Workshop program provides music majors and non-majors with opportunities to perform a wide variety of opera, musical theatre and operetta music.

Recent Opera Workshop productions include a fully staged performance of the Baroque opera “Dido and Aeneas”; well-known Broadway musicals “Ragtime,” “Guys and Dolls” and “Into the Woods”; and “Bulldogs on Broadway,” a Cabaret performance produced by Mississippi Opera in Jackson.

For more Opera Workshop information, contact Tulyaganova at rozat@colled.msstate.edu.

Part of MSU’s College of Education, the nationally accredited Department of Music is online at www.music.msstate.edu, as well as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @MSStateMusic.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

From the Gallery – March 2018

March 20th, 2018 Comments Off on From the Gallery – March 2018

Dominic Lippillo honored with 2018 South Arts State Fellowship

March 20th, 2018 Comments Off on Dominic Lippillo honored with 2018 South Arts State Fellowship

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

A faculty member in Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art and Design is being recognized for his role in advancing Southern vitality through the arts.

Dominic Lippillo, an associate professor in the university’s Department of Art, is among nine visual artists from around the region receiving a $5,000 State Fellowship from Atlanta, Georgia-based nonprofit South Arts. In addition to Mississippi, this year’s recipients represent Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.

Selected from nearly 700 visual artists by a panel of four jurors, the State Fellowship recipients now are in consideration for the South Arts Southern Prize, which includes $25,000 and a two-week residency at the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts and Sciences in Rabun Gap, Georgia. One fellow also will be named a finalist and receive a $10,000 prize.

All of the award winners will be recognized at an April 16 ceremony in New Orleans.

Now in their second year, the South Arts State Fellowships and Southern Prize mission is to celebrate and support the highest quality artistic work being created in the American South. Visual artists living in South Arts’ nine-state region and producing crafts, drawing, experimental art, painting, photography, sculpture, mixed media and multidisciplinary work are eligible to apply. For more, visit www.southarts.org.

“We are very proud to support Southern artists,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “These State Fellows reflect the richly diverse arts and culture of our region, and each offers a distinct viewpoint with their work and background. The Southern Prize and State Fellowships are an important vehicle for artistic and professional growth of artists in the South.”

An MSU faculty member since 2010, Lippillo earned his bachelor’s in photography from Youngstown State University in 2005 and master’s in photography from Ohio University in 2009. Digital photography and photography survey are among courses Lippillo has taught at MSU.

Lippillo’s solo and collaborative work addresses ideas pertaining to memory, space and place, and vernacular photographic images. His photographs are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Photographic Art; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and universities of Alabama and North Dakota.

His work also has been published in the journal “Exposure” and in the supplement of images accompanying Bruce Warren’s textbook “Photography: The Concise Guide” (2nd Edition, March 2011). Lippillo’s other honors include a 2013 MSU Faculty Research Award and 2016 Mississippi Arts Commission Fellowship. For more, visit https://dominic-lippillo.pixpa.com.

Celebrating its 50th year, MSU’s Department of Art is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. Learn more at www.caad.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Dominic Lippillo honored with 2018 South Arts State Fellowship

March 6th, 2018 Comments Off on Dominic Lippillo honored with 2018 South Arts State Fellowship

“Pond,” an ink jet print from Dominic Lippillo’s “Stories We Tell Ourselves” series

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

A faculty member in Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art and Design is being recognized for his role in advancing Southern vitality through the arts.

Dominic Lippillo, an associate professor in the university’s Department of Art, is among nine visual artists from around the region receiving a $5,000 State Fellowship from Atlanta, Georgia-based nonprofit South Arts. In addition to Mississippi, this year’s recipients represent Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.

Selected from nearly 700 visual artists by a panel of four jurors, the State Fellowship recipients now are in consideration for the South Arts Southern Prize, which includes $25,000 and a two-week residency at the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts and Sciences in Rabun Gap, Georgia. One fellow also will be named a finalist and receive a $10,000 prize.

All of the award winners will be recognized at an April 16 ceremony in New Orleans.

Now in their second year, the South Arts State Fellowships and Southern Prize mission is to celebrate and support the highest quality artistic work being created in the American South. Visual artists living in South Arts’ nine-state region and producing crafts, drawing, experimental art, painting, photography, sculpture, mixed media and multidisciplinary work are eligible to apply. For more, visit www.southarts.org.

“We are very proud to support Southern artists,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “These State Fellows reflect the richly diverse arts and culture of our region, and each offers a distinct viewpoint with their work and background. The Southern Prize and State Fellowships are an important vehicle for artistic and professional growth of artists in the South.”

An MSU faculty member since 2010, Lippillo earned his bachelor’s in photography from Youngstown State University in 2005 and master’s in photography from Ohio University in 2009. Digital photography and photography survey are among courses Lippillo has taught at MSU.

Lippillo’s solo and collaborative work addresses ideas pertaining to memory, space and place, and vernacular photographic images. His photographs are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Photographic Art; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and universities of Alabama and North Dakota.

His work also has been published in the journal “Exposure” and in the supplement of images accompanying Bruce Warren’s textbook “Photography: The Concise Guide” (2nd Edition, March 2011). Lippillo’s other honors include a 2013 MSU Faculty Research Award and 2016 Mississippi Arts Commission Fellowship. For more, visit https://dominic-lippillo.pixpa.com.

Celebrating 50 years at MSU, the Department of Art is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. Learn more at www.caad.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

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