Design II students present Barn Quilt Trail squares

April 28th, 2015 Comments Off on Design II students present Barn Quilt Trail squares

Assistant Professor Neil Callander’s Design II students presented their final projects today – squares for the Oktibbeha County Barn Quilt Trail.

For the project, students made eight quilt pieces that will be installed around the community as part of the trail. The project is sponsored by the Center for Advancement of Service-Learning Excellence (CASLE) and the Starkville Area Arts Council (SAAC).

Students learned service learning, collaboration and how to use art/design skills to engage the community.

Department of Art takes on NYC

December 15th, 2014 Comments Off on Department of Art takes on NYC

The Department of Art offered an exciting, new one-hour course this fall, Art 2990: Art Field Study New York City.

The course provided students with an alternative to classroom-based learning and allowed them to experience firsthand historical and contemporary aspects of the New York art-and-design world. It was open to all art majors (sophomore-level and up) from any concentration and was taught by Gallery Director Lori Neuenfeldt and Assistant Professor Neil Callander.

The group traveled to New York from Oct. 22 – 25 to explore museums, artists’ studios, galleries, graduate programs and other cultural attractions.

A video the students created from the trip:

Click to see the video on Vimeo.

Read a blog put together by some of the students below:
nycblog_kaitlynsydney_Page_1 nycblog_kaitlynsydney_Page_2 nycblog_kaitlynsydney_Page_3 nycblog_kaitlynsydney_Page_4 nycblog_kaitlynsydney_Page_5 nycblog_kaitlynsydney_Page_6

Click to download the blog PDF.

MSU students, faculty help launch NYC art field study

November 14th, 2014 Comments Off on MSU students, faculty help launch NYC art field study

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Seniors Britney Johnson, a graphic design major from Bay St. Louis, and Christina McField, a fine arts major from Madison, relax at Central Park’s Bethesda Fountain. They were among 16 MSU art majors recently completing a five-day field study in New York City. Photo by: submitted/Lauren Blalock

By Sasha Steinberg | MSU Office of Public Affairs

Sixteen students and two faculty members in Mississippi State’s art department are back on campus following a five-day field study in New York City.

Led by instructor Lori Neuenfeldt and assistant professor Neil Callander, the students are part of the university department’s new Special Topic in ART-Art Field Study. The course was created to provide historical and contemporary cultural experiences in the Big Apple’s worlds of art and design through visits to museums, galleries, artists’ studios and design firms, among other activities.

Neuenfeldt said the course also was designed to give MSU students, many from small cities and towns, the confidence to travel and pursue cultural experiences as they prepare for professional careers after graduation.

“We already see that the students who went on the trip are extra motivated to start their careers and are considering the possibilities that a cultural center like New York has to offer,” she said.

Currently being offered only to sophomore-senior art majors during the fall semester, the one-hour elective resulted from a year-long planning collaboration by Neuenfeldt, Callander, veteran art professor Brent Funderburk and assistant professor Greg Martin.

“The art department has done trips to cities in the past, but they were never built into a particular course like they are in other programs, such as architecture, fashion design and merchandising, and interior design,” Neuenfeldt said. “We designed this experienced-based field study course for our fine art, graphic design and photography majors, especially for those who were missing out on a key component of the fine-arts experience, seeing works of art in person.”

Since the group contained graphic design and fine art majors, “we wanted to offer experiences that highlighted both careers,” she emphasized.

Among other locales, the MSU group visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art, graphic design work spaces of Kate Spade Saturday and The Barbarian Group, along with a shared loft in the SoHo neighborhood of artists Claudia DeMonte and Ed McGowan.

Perhaps most importantly, the students and faculty had opportunities to meet with former MSU art majors that have “made it” in New York. They included Jessi Arrington, co-founder of WORKSHOP Graphic Design Firm; Sarah Foley, design manager at Johnson & Johnson; Angela Minor, graphic designer for Global Visual Merchandising & Store Design at The Estée Lauder Cos. Inc.; Meredith Norwood, head designer at Azzure Home; and June Upton, a graduate student at Parsons: The New School for Design.

Combining notes, sketches, photographs and videos compiled during the week, the 16-member class now is working to create a “pitch” that will be presented to other students, faculty and interested members of the public at the semester’s conclusion.

One class member is senior Molly M. Howell, an art/painting major from Estill Springs, Tennessee, who previously had visited New York with her family. Viewing works of world-famous artists in Chelsea neighborhood galleries and visiting graduate school representatives from top U.S. art schools on the Parsons campus were among her highlights, she said.

“Having the opportunity to go to New York City and be exposed to the art scene there taught me that MSU is giving me all the tools I need to take my career and life to the next step,” Howell said.

Senior graphic design major Britney Johnson of Bay St. Louis said she most appreciated “encouraging” and “invaluable” insights of the former MSU students.

“Coming from a small town in Mississippi, it sometimes seems like being successful in a place like New York is out of reach, but seeing a community of MSU alumni living and working in New York and hearing their stories really showed me that it is not,” she said.

“There are MSU alumni doing big things in the Big Apple, and hopefully, this trip will show other students that they can be next,” she added.

Part of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design, the art department currently offers a bachelor’s degree with concentrations in ceramics, drawing, graphic design, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

Barn Trail kickoff to be held Oct. 18

October 16th, 2014 Comments Off on Barn Trail kickoff to be held Oct. 18

During the just-concluded spring semester, a group of MSU students were part of a service-learning art project to design and paint an eight-foot-square wooden barn quilt. Among group members were (l-r) Brooke Rankins, Katy Coleman and Sydney Armer. Photo by: Megan Bean

During the spring 2013 semester, MSU art students were part of a service-learning art project to design and paint an eight-foot-square wooden barn quilt. Among group members were (l-r) Brooke Rankins, Katy Coleman and Sydney Armer. Photo by: Megan Bean

Mississippi State University art students in Assistant Professors Suzanne Powney and Neil Callander’s classes have been hard at work since last semester helping the Starkville Area Arts Council with the Barn Quilt Trail program in the area.

The kickoff for the Barn Quilt Trail will be held this Sat., Oct. 18 at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum at 5:30 p.m. along with a blues concert.

For more information about the Barn Quilt Trail, visit http://www.barnquiltinfo.com/

 

Adrienne, Neil Callander selected for 2014 ‘Mississippi Invitational’

October 16th, 2014 Comments Off on Adrienne, Neil Callander selected for 2014 ‘Mississippi Invitational’

Neil Callander, "Dusty’s Table, 2011." Oil on linen on panel, 38” x 38”.

Neil Callander, Dusty’s Table, 2011. Oil on linen on panel, 38” x 38”.

"Dad’s Hawaiian Shirt, 2013"

Adrienne Callander, “Dad’s Hawaiian Shirt, 2013”

(Mississippi Museum of Art media release)

The Mississippi Museum of Art (the Museum) is pleased to announce the fifteen artists selected for inclusion in the 2014 “Mississippi Invitational” exhibition.

The artists, all residents of Mississippi, are Carolyn Busenlener, Pearlington; Adrienne Callander, Starkville; Neil Callander, Starkville; Shawn Lee Dickey, Columbus; Marcus Frazier, Natchez; Lou Haney, Oxford; Chatham Kemp, Hattiesburg; Ruth Miller, Picayune; Don Norris, Hattiesburg; Anne O’Hara, Jackson; David Jason Pressgrove, Jackson; Andrew Smith, Oxford; Gregory Walker, Jackson; J. Marcus Weekley, Gulfport; and Milly West, Oxford.

Initiated in 1997, the “Mississippi Invitational” surveys recent developments by contemporary visual artists living and working across the state and includes work in diverse media. The 2014 exhibition marks the ninth iteration and is on view from Nov. 1, 2014, through Jan. 25, 2015.

“For me, it was a transformative experience to travel the state from Holly Springs to Pearlington in pursuit of recent art by such talented creators,” said Roger Ward, MMA deputy director and chief curator. “Mississippi is genuinely blessed to be the home of so many brilliant artists.”

This year’s process began with the museum’s call to artists for sample images of their work. One hundred fifteen submissions were considered by guest curator Carla Hanzal, an independent curator and writer, who most recently served as the curator of modern and contemporary art at the Mint Museum in Charlotte, N.C., a position she held for ten years. A recipient of a Truman Scholarship as well as a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, Hanzal is currently a trustee of the International Sculpture Center, the publisher of Sculpture magazine. She identified twenty-four applicants for in-person studio visits and, after six days of statewide travel, narrowed that number to the final fifteen.

“This was a unique opportunity for me to become better acquainted with one of the most creative and artistically diverse regions of the country,” said Hanzal. “Mississippi is surely one of the richest states with respect to art and the making of art. It is astonishing.”

In addition to exhibiting in the “Mississippi Invitational” exhibition, all fifteen artists are eligible to apply for The Jane Crater Hiatt Artist Fellowship. The fellowship was created in 2005 by Jane Crater Hiatt and her late husband Wood (1930 –2010) in response to the need to nurture and invigorate the arts in the state.

A grant of up to $15,000 is awarded to one artist who may use it for study with an individual artist or in a studio, workshop, or residency setting; to pursue projects which further artistic development and support the realization of specific creative ideas; to purchase supplies and equipment; to conduct research; and to travel. The artist is then required to donate one original work of art to the museum from at least five works created during the two-year grant period.

This year’s fellowship recipient will be announced at a private reception for the exhibiting artists on Oct. 31.

According to Hiatt, “The idea for this fellowship grew from my years of listening to artists and learning what a difference mid-career travel and study can make in an artist’s vision, skill and scope. Wood and I wanted to foster that. And we wanted to enhance the Mississippi Museum of Art’s relationship with artists living in the state.”

Presenting sponsors for the exhibition include the Hiatt-Ingram Fund of the Community Foundation of Greater Jackson/Jane Hiatt and Yates Construction. This exhibition is partially funded by a grant through the Mississippi Development Authority Tourism Division.

“The Museum is thrilled to present the Mississippi Invitational once again,” said Betsy Bradley, MMA Director. “We are so grateful to Jane Crater Hiatt for her vision, for her ability to translate that vision into a meaningful reality and for her genuine love of artists and their art.”

An opening reception for “Mississippi Invitational” artists, special guests and Museum members is scheduled for Oct.31, from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m.

The fourth annual Town Creek Arts Festival, held on Nov. 1, will feature the display and sale of artwork by artists included in the “Mississippi Invitational,” among others. For more information on the Town Creek Arts Festival, visit www.msmuseumart.org.

On Nov. 2 at 2 p.m., Hanzal will be joined by Hiatt and the recipient of the 2014 Hiatt Artist Fellowship for a panel discussion moderated by Ward. The event is free and open to the public.

Admission to the 2014 “Mississippi Invitational” is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $6 for students (includes admission to Spanish Sojourns: Robert Henri and the Spirit of Spain.). Children 5 and under and museum members will receive free admission.

The Mississippi Museum of Art’s mission is to “engage Mississippians in the visual arts.” The Museum is located at 380 South Lamar Street in Jackson. Museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. The Museum is closed on Monday. For more information about the Mississippi Museum of Art’s exhibitions, programs, and special events, please call 601-960-1515 or 1-866-VIEW ART (843-9278), or visit www.msmuseumart.org.

The Mississippi Museum of Art and its programs are sponsored in part by the city of Jackson and the Jackson Convention & Visitors Bureau. Support is also provided in part by funding from the Mississippi Arts Commission, a state agency, and in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Read the story on MSU’s website.

 

Barn Quilt project lets art students connect with community

May 12th, 2014 Comments Off on Barn Quilt project lets art students connect with community

During the just-concluded spring semester, a group of MSU students were part of a service-learning art project to design and paint an eight-foot-square wooden barn quilt. Among group members were (l-r) Brooke Rankins, Katy Coleman and Sydney Armer. Photo by: Megan Bean

During the just-concluded spring semester, a group of MSU students were part of a service-learning art project to design and paint an eight-foot-square wooden barn quilt. Among group members were (l-r) Brooke Rankins, Katy Coleman and Sydney Armer. Photo by: Megan Bean

By Allison Matthews | MSU Public Affairs

A community project by students in a Mississippi State art class may have a lasting local impact as part of a national Barn Quilt Trail program.

Barn quilts began several years ago in Ohio and quickly became a trend that spread across the United States. Typically, an eight-by-eight-foot wooden square is painted to resemble a quilt block and positioned at the front of a barn or other structure.

With a goal to put Mississippi on the national Barn Quilt “map,” members of the Starkville Area Arts Council became interested in the project for Oktibbeha County.

The organization was aided by the university’s Center for the Advancement of Service-Learning Excellence–CASLE, for short–that works to identify and develop ways to incorporate service-learning projects into course curricula.

When complete, the finished works will be installed at such locations such as the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum, Starkville Community Market, Habitat for Humanity warehouse, and a local park, as well as the MSU Horse Park.

A website managed by Suzi Parron, author of “Barn Quilts and the American Quilt Trail Movement,” shows Oktibbeha and Greene counties as the first in Mississippi to participate in the national trail. See www.barnquiltinfo.com for more.

April Heiselt, CASLE director, said service-learning is a holistic approach to instruction that integrates meaningful community service and civic engagement into academic objectives. Using experiential learning and critical reflection, it is designed to enrich educational experiences, teach civic responsibility and meet the needs of communities, the associate professor of counseling and educational psychology added.

SAAC member Vicki Burnett, Oktibbeha County Quilt Trail co-chair, brought the idea to Heiselt who, in turn, contacted MSU art department faculty.

Jamie Mixon, interim department head, and Neil Callander, assistant professor, thought the project would fit well with a design course.

Heiselt said, “Neil already used quilts to teach color block theory. I don’t think I could have developed a class that could have been a more perfect match for this particular service-learning project.”

Also taking part was assistant professor Suzanne Powney, who included the project in her graphic design course.

Callander’s students, primarily art and graphic design majors, were studying color palettes and color interactivity. He said they first worked individually to create a full-color Barn Quilt design influenced by research about the traditional quilt-making folk art and other color theory topics.

Next, they formed teams to collaborate on the design and creation of the eight-foot-square quilts.

Ava Moore, the other Oktibbeha County Quilt Trail co-chair, and Burnett are helping coordinate with other local groups and individuals to create additional barn quilts. Plans include placements at the Sam Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, Oktoc Community Center and adjacent Oktoc Fire Station, and on some private barns.

Burnett, a painter, said her own family is creating one for the art studio by her Sunnyland Estates home. Formerly a Leake County 1940s-era country store, the studio was moved from its original location.

“I think there’s a lot of value in taking the art of quilting beyond the home to appreciate this traditional art in a new way,” said the owner of Burnett Art, Cowbells and Calligraphy. “So many community members and entities are coming together to make our community more aesthetically pleasing.”

Callander said service-learning projects like this provide excellent venues for students to apply academics to real-world situations.

Freshman Kelli M. Clayton of Pass Christian, a double-major in drawing and design, agreed, saying she enjoyed creating a small quilt design and seeing it through to creation on a much larger scale.

As part of her research, she studied aesthetic qualities inherent to the local area. “I also researched Choctaw Indians and found that they revered the sun and eagles. We’ve incorporated eagle feathers into our design,” she said.

Clayton called the project “very rewarding because, not only are you learning, you’re helping the community.”

While this time it was art courses, CASLE also has facilitated service-learning projects in the colleges of Business, Education and Bagley College of Engineering. For more, visit http://servicelearning.msstate.edu.

Neil Callander’s Design II class featured on WCBI News

April 21st, 2014 Comments Off on Neil Callander’s Design II class featured on WCBI News

Click here to watch the video!

STARKVILLE (WCBI) — With help from the Starkville Area Arts Council, the MSU Center For Service Learning Excellence and the Heritage Museum, a barn quilt trail is being put together in Oktibbeha County.

Two special art classes are in session on the campus of MSU, bold colors are being used in creating what’s called “barn quilts” made of board that will hang on barns and various building.

“The idea is that they get passed on to community members and installed this summer, these first 6 to be installed around the community this summer,” said Neil Callander with the MSU Art Department.

“It take a lot of work and a lot of dedication. And even though we’re being graded on these, there is no greater honor,” said MSU art student Sydney Armer.

One of those quilt designs will be placed at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum.

“Its going to be great, like I did that, you know; I helped put that there,” said Armer.

Working together in small groups putting designs on eight-inch sheets of paper, is being painted onto eight-foot boards. The idea is to capture and preserve what has made the area great in past years.

“Old barns in the area and how they rust and how the colors turn and age. Some of the students researched color palates and they researched the quilting history of the area of, our areas and of the south in general,” said Callander.

Now with the establishment of the Oktibbeha County Quilt Trail, Mississippi now joins Nevada in being included among the states having barn quilt trails.

“So yeah, we may be late to the game but I think we are going to do a really good job,” said Callander.

“I think I can speak on behalf of my whole class that it’s a great thing to help out the community so,” said Armer.

Quilt designs can be of people and even plants. The Oktibbeha County Barn Quilt Trail is expected to be completed by this summer.

Art professor shares Iceland residency experience

October 18th, 2013 Comments Off on Art professor shares Iceland residency experience

Neil and Adrienne Callander participated in a residency at Gullkistan in Iceland this summer.

Neil and Adrienne Callander participated in a residency at Gullkistan in Iceland this summer.

Neil and Adrienne Callander, professors in the Department of Art, participated in a residency at Gullkistan in Iceland this summer.

Today, Adrienne and the FiberPaperArt Club Skyped with Icelandic botanist and natural dye specialist, Guðrún Bjarnadóttir, to learn about specific Icelandic plants and her dye processes. The Callanders visited Bjarnadóttir’s studio along the western coast of Iceland in early August.  Read Adrienne’s blog post about that visit.

Read more on Adrienne’s blog about the residency at Gullkistan and her experiences:
Open House
• “This link covers a lovely little village church,” said Adrienne. “They dot the whole countryside!”
Solheimar, an eco-village and integrated community where adult residents with developmental handicaps live and work and make art.
• Off-roading adventure:
The Lake Road
   The Road Home
   More

Visit Gullkistan.is to read more about the residency.

Department of Art students work on chalk drawing project

August 29th, 2013 Comments Off on Department of Art students work on chalk drawing project

photo 3 photo 1

Students in Professor Neil Callander’s Art 1123: Foundation Design I course recently worked on a small public art installation project.

Working in groups, students used a chalk reel to install straight-line only drawings that interacted with the environment.

“The students and the university community loved it, said Callander. “I hope to build on this project in the future.”

Department of Art professors to participate in live stream from Iceland

July 25th, 2013 Comments Off on Department of Art professors to participate in live stream from Iceland

Neil and Adrienne Callander and their son and other members of the residency in Gullkistan, Iceland. (photo from gullkistan.is)

Neil and Adrienne Callander and their son and other members of the residency in Gullkistan, Iceland. (photo from gullkistan.is)

Neil and Adrienne Callander, professors in the Department of Art, will participate in a live stream artists’ talk about their studio practice and the work that has developed over the past month during their residency at Gullkistan in Iceland.

Don’t miss your chance to see the studio space, glimpse some of the art, hear a reading of new fiction, and visit with others affiliated with the Gullkistan residency.
The talk will begin on July 25 at 11 a.m. CST, and the Callanders will be joined by the other members of the residency. The live stream will last approximately two hours.
Visit Gullkistan.is to watch the live stream and read more about the residency.

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