One Night Only show held for 2018 Emerging Craftsperson Resident

November 15th, 2017 Comments Off on One Night Only show held for 2018 Emerging Craftsperson Resident

(Photos via Kenan Simpkins)
 
 
The show ended the jewelry artist’s fall stay at the university during which time he created new works of art while interacting with faculty and students.

The MSU Emerging Craftsperson Residency Program is funded with a grant provided by Arkansas-based nonprofit Windgate Charitable Trust. 

 Read more about Parnham’s stay here. 

‘Contact F17’ exhibition celebrates MSU photography seniors’ work

November 14th, 2017 Comments Off on ‘Contact F17’ exhibition celebrates MSU photography seniors’ work

“Doll Head” by Jenna Todd is part of her series that captures details left behind in abandoned structures. (Submitted/by Jenna Todd)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Diverse works by graduating majors of Mississippi State’s Department of Art are on display Nov. 16-Dec. 1 in the university’s Cullis Wade Depot Art Gallery.

Free to all, the “Contact F17: BFA Photography Thesis Exhibition” celebrates the final year of studies for five students enrolled in the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. They include Kamau J. Bostic of Richmond, Virginia; Jenni L. Kilburn of Duck Hill; Chauncey D. Mangum of Florence; Jenna A. Todd of Quincy, Illinois; and Whitney A. White of Oxford.

Gallery hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday, as well as by appointment.

A public reception takes place 5-6 p.m. Thursday [Nov. 16] in the Cullis Wade Depot Art Gallery on the second floor of the university’s Welcome Center at 75 B.S. Hood Drive. Refreshments will be provided.

“Contact F17” reflects the students’ successful conclusion of departmental research, writing and presentation requirements, as well as four years of foundational coursework, survey, art history, and academic and emphasis classes.

During their time at MSU, the students have benefited from the expertise and support of Professor Marita Gootee and Assistant Professor Dominic Lippillo. Both teach in the department’s photography emphasis area, with Gootee as its longtime coordinator.

Bostic’s body of work “My Generation” focuses on the inspiration and identity of individuals with tattoos and explores millennial ideals and attitudes regarding body art. Communicating through the visual language of photography was Bostic’s primary goal.

For her photographic series “Chemical Balance,” Kilburn created representational and metaphorical depictions of anxiety disorders, the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults age 18 and older. Each image is designed to show how time seems to stop and last forever for those dealing with such disorders, while appearing only as a passing moment to the viewer.   

Mangum’s series of images “Reminders” focuses on the African American community where he grew up. Visiting with relatives and others while working on this project inspired him to overcome a sense of fear to return home and gave him a better understanding of how his past has shaped his future.

Todd captured the hidden details left behind in abandoned homes, schools, hospitals, hotels and churches. Through her collection of photographs “Forsaken with Time,” Todd seeks to convey each location’s unique story while giving readers a fascinating glimpse into the past.

Titled “Fragmented Abstraction,” White’s photographic series shows the unknown beauty of friends and family members with whom she has grown close. Individual photographs are organized in a grid to convey the connection that exists between family and friends, as well as help the viewer focus on the abstracted form and beauty of the human body.

In addition to the art department, the “Contact F17” exhibition is made possible with support from the Center for Student Activities. For more information, contact Lori Neuenfeldt, the MSU art department’s gallery director, at 662-325-2970 or LNeuenfeldt@caad.msstate.edu.

Learn more about MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design and its Department of Art at www.caad.msstate.edu, as well as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CAADatMSU.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Second Emerging Craftsperson Resident to showcase work Nov. 9

November 6th, 2017 Comments Off on Second Emerging Craftsperson Resident to showcase work Nov. 9

 

 

The MSU Emerging Craftsperson Residency Program is funded with a grant provided by Arkansas-based nonprofit Windgate Charitable Trust. 

Bryan Parnham has been hard at work this semester creating new works of art while interacting with faculty and students.

“This opportunity allowed me to try things in my work I’ve been thinking about for years,” said the artist. “MSU and the Windgate Foundation provided invaluable resources and freedom to explore new ideas.”

Parnham recently taught a workshop to two art classes on ‘marquetry’ techniques – a process of cutting and arranging veneer to achieve a pattern. Each student made a number of samples and mounted their final piece on a sheet of bronze as a brooch.

“It’s been a pleasure to intermittently share demos and lectures,” he said. “I think this program is doing something important by putting young, professional artists in front of students.”

Parnham’s residency will conclude with a 6:30  p.m. show and reception Thurs., Nov. 9 in the university’s Howell Building sculpture studio. The event is free to all, and refreshments will be served.

Parnham began his jewelry practice in 2011 while attending the Virginia Commonwealth University, Craft/Material Studies Department. He served as a Penland Core Fellow from 2014-2016.

For more information on MSU’s Emerging Craftsperson Residency Program, contact Critz Campbell at 662-275-1064 or CCampbell@caad.msstate.edu.

Part of the College of Architecture, Art and Design, MSU’s art department is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. 

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Latest One Night Only show, ‘Line,’ features four CAAD students

November 4th, 2017 Comments Off on Latest One Night Only show, ‘Line,’ features four CAAD students

Via Kenan Simpkins

A One Night Only show, “Line,” was held on Thurs., Nov. 2.

The show featured a variety of line pieces from Alex Cayson, Matthew Lewis, Madison Cheek and Claire Burgett.

Cayson showed printmaking pieces and one drawing, and Lewis showed several architectural blueprints and several photographs.

Cheek exhibited watercolor pieces and several paintings, and Burgett also displayed watercolor pieces.

Read more about this semester’s shows.

 

From the Gallery – October 2017

October 30th, 2017 Comments Off on From the Gallery – October 2017

From The Gallery -October 2017 from CAADatMSU on Vimeo.

‘Color’ One Night Only show features illustrations, paintings

October 28th, 2017 Comments Off on ‘Color’ One Night Only show features illustrations, paintings

A One Night Only show, “Color,” was held on Thurs., Oct. 26.

The show featured a variety of color pieces from students Lauryn Rody, Kate Webb and Danny Clark.

Rody showed illustration pieces; Webb showcased several abstract paintings, and Clark highlighted four paintings.

Read more about this semester’s shows.

MSU student raingarden collaboration garners national recognition

October 26th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU student raingarden collaboration garners national recognition

By | Vanessa Beeson

STARKVILLE, Miss.—Mississippi State University is receiving a national award from the American Society of Landscape Architects.

The MSU raingarden, funded by a $20,000 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant, has been honored in the society’s student collaboration category. MSU team members accepted the award at the society’s annual meeting and expo in Los Angeles this week [Oct. 20-23]. 

Cory Gallo, associate professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture, said landscape architecture and graphic design students worked side-by-side throughout the process of building a sustainable water management demonstration garden.

“The concerted effort wrapped up during a cross-college design/build class this spring,” said Gallo, who led the class alongside Suzanne Powney, assistant professor in graphic design. “Both landscape architects and graphic designers partner often in the real world and each discipline fosters different perspectives. This project gave students a chance to learn from each other by viewing the same problem from different angles.”

Gallo also said several others played a vital role, specifically MSU Facilities Management.

Tommy Verdell Jr., associate director of MSU Facilities Management, said the experience was a chance for his team to help out in the classroom.

“We were privileged to be a part of that whole academic enterprise and to see the skills of the students develop and grow,” Verdell said.  

Rodney Barksdale, carpentry supervisor, also was involved in the work.

“The best part was being able to interact with the students to share what I’ve learned over the years and then see them put the pieces together,” Barksdale said.

Caitlin Buckner, a landscape architecture senior and Starkville native, said the experience taught her several new skills including “how to fit pipes, cut boards and make water flow out of the cistern.”  

Graphic design senior and Madison, Alabama native, Lauryn Rody, said the project opened her eyes to options within the graphic design field.

“We had to demonstrate how the garden worked and employ processes like wayfinding. It went much further than the basic principles of graphic design,” Rody said.

Other MSU collaborators on the garden included the Bagley College of Engineering; Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station; College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; College of Architecture, Art and Design; and the Water Resources Research Institute.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Read the story in the Clarion Ledger here.

MSU Department of Art gallery director featured in Tupelo newspaper

October 17th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU Department of Art gallery director featured in Tupelo newspaper

Lori Neuenfeldt (photo by Adam Robison via djournal.com)

By Scott Morris | via Daily Journal

Mississippi State University’s Moore Hall houses a roomful of colorful history.

“We have approximately 2,000 objects,” said Lori Neuenfeldt, instructor and gallery director.

Specifically, the MSU Historic Costume and Textiles Collection preserves clothes, shoes and accessories. The oldest item dates back to the 1840s. Some were for everyday wear, others strictly reserved for special occasions.

“We don’t repair. We preserve them and protect them,” Neuenfeldt said. “We don’t try to bring them back to life. We’re more interested in the stories they have to tell.”

Some might not think of fashion as a serious topic, but it touches every aspect of human life. The differences between a store-bought silk dress and a handmade wool dress can speak to class, economic development, regional trends and down-to-earth realities of human existence.

“All of the garments have been worn by people,” Neuenfeldt said. “They have been lived in.”

In the past, clothes were constructed with the future in mind. A man’s coat or a woman’s dress could be passed down to children and siblings. Every ripped seam required needle and thread, rather than a trip to the department store or mall.

“If we get a hole in a shirt, unless it’s a favorite, favorite shirt, we don’t repair it,” Neuenfeldt said. “Victorians passed clothing down for generations and generations.”

When people first hear about a costume collection, they can get the wrong idea.

“They say, ‘Oh, I like the theater,’” she said. “No, costume is the academic term for historical fashion.”

But there has been theatrical interest. Professors and students from the University of Southern Mississippi traveled to Starkville for close-up views.

“They were interested in how they made those 1890s puffy sleeves,” Neuenfeldt said, holding up an example. “You can feel the horse hair in there that makes this leg-of-mutton-style sleeve.”

The visitors wanted to reproduce clothes for the stage. In the search for historical accuracy, they might use hooks and eyes, which were the norm until the zipper came into wide use during the 1930s.

“It was exciting for me to have them come,” Neuenfeldt said, “because they could elaborate on the construction of the clothing.”

The collection is affiliated with MSU’s fashion design and marketing program, so students can inspect and observe.

“It’s helping me learn the history and construction of clothing,” said Water Valley’s Taylor Anne Trusty, a freshman student worker who puts information about the collection into a searchable database. “I’ve learned fashion repeats itself. We tend to just make small changes to clothes over the years.”

Most changes are cosmetic, but others respond to momentous world events.

“During the 1940s,” Neuenfeldt said, “they had restrictions. People had to give their material to the war effort.”

If given the chance to add one piece to the collection, she might ask for a Christian Dior dress from 1947 or ’48. Dior remains a widely known luxury brand, but the time period is equally important when it comes to telling a story through fashion.

“Post World War II, Christian Dior introduced full skirts and used more yards of fabric than had been used in years,” Neuenfeldt said. “A lot of people saw it and said, ‘This is his way of saying the war was over.’”

Dior had his critics. Europe was devastated by the fighting. The end of open warfare didn’t rebuild homes, bring back jobs and return loved ones.

“Some were offended by the use of the fabric because there was so much poverty, and people were spending money on what many would consider frivolous fashion,” she said. “A Dior would symbolize so much about history.”

The collection has the capacity to surprise, as when visitors marvel at how long it would take to lace up an old-school pair of boots.

It also can offend. Several items incorporate fur, which was considered a symbol of status. Men wore their raccoon coats and women had their mink stoles. Babies even got into the act.

“We have a pair of baby slippers that look like rabbits and have rabbit fur on them,” Neuenfeldt said.

The collection focuses on U.S. items, but there are some international objects, including a pair of silk Chinese binding slippers.

“A female of high status would have her feet bound when she was younger,” Neuenfeldt said. “It would prevent them from growing. Small feet were considered beautiful. A lot of times the foot would grow around it. They would not be able to walk very well. They had to be carried.”

That might seem shocking, but Chinese women aren’t the only ones who underwent pain to attain a cultural ideal of beauty. Tight-fitting corsets are mostly in the past, but high heels are still exacting their price, and many women consider the cost worth it.

“Again, it’s a status symbol,” Neuenfeldt said. “Because you’re wearing high heels, you’re not doing hard labor. It sends a message. People will interpret the things you wear.”

The collection room at Moore Hall has undergone renovations in recent years. The carpet was removed and metal shelving was installed. Windows were covered to keep out natural light that could damage fragile fabrics.

“We have electronic devices that monitor the temperature and the humidity,” she said. “We need to maintain 67 degrees to keep the garments happy.”

Though space is limited, there’s room for more. Neuenfeldt isn’t interested in repeating items, but there are holes in MSU’s colorful collection of history. To make a donation or arrange a tour, go to www.historiccostume.msstate.edu.

Visitors will find themselves within one degree of separation between the present day and nearly 180 years of intimate human history.

“Really,” Neuenfeldt said, “you can study everything from clothing.”

Brent Funderburk’s ‘Angelus Vitae’ in noted national showcase

October 14th, 2017 Comments Off on Brent Funderburk’s ‘Angelus Vitae’ in noted national showcase

“Angelus Vitae”, 22″ x 38″, watercolor, 2017 | Brent Funderburk

Brent Funderburk, a long time Mississippi State University professor, has one of his artworks showing in a national juried exhibition for the month of October.

Funderburk’s “Angelus Vitae” a watercolor painting, was chosen by juror Stephen Quiller to be exhibited in the 44th Annual Rocky Mountain National Watermedia Exhibition, showing at the Evergreen Center for the Arts in Evergreen, Co., from Sept. 16 to Oct. 28. A reception for the artists was held on Sept. 16.

Funderburk

Quiller, a noted painter and author, chose 73 works from 549 entries submitted. In his interview with Southwest Art Magazine (September, 2017), Quiller stated that “one of the draws for many artists is the show’s reputation for experimentation.” A color catalog has been produced for the exhibit, which is viewed as one of the best exhibits showcasing watermedia painters in the United States.

According to Funderburk, “Angelus Vitae,” ‘angel of life,’ emerged out of a need to express gratitude for the female – mother; wife; lover; muse. The impulse that runs through the series is an exposition of Her varied appearances, in the still air of close objects, in vast space, and in the intimations of dreams. 

Funderburk, a William L. Giles Distinguished Professor at Mississippi State, has taught there since 1982, serving as department head, senior fine art coordinator and fine art coordinator.

Part of the College of Architecture, Art and Design, MSU’s Department of Art is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program. 

See the story at msstate.edu.

Read about it in the Maroon Memo.

 

International photo competition honors Dominic Lippillo

October 13th, 2017 Comments Off on International photo competition honors Dominic Lippillo

“Car Lot” is among 10 images by MSU art faculty member Dominic Lippillo selected for judging in Photolucida’s 2017 Critical Mass portfolio competition. (Photo submitted/courtesy of Dominic Lippillo)

Photographic images by Dominic Lippillo of Mississippi State have been honored among top finalists in Photolucida’s 2017 Critical Mass portfolio competition.

A nonprofit organization based in Portland, Oregon, Photolucida works to “expand, inspire, educate and connect” photography communities around the world. The CM competition involves submissions of 10-image portfolios.

Lippillo, an associate professor in the university’s art department, is among 200 whose entries were selected for final review by an international panel of professionals representing a range of photographic interests.

Lippillo’s portfolio entry comes from a series titled “Stories We Tell Ourselves,” which may be viewed at https://dominic-lippillo.pixpa.com/solowork/stories-we-tell-ourselves1.  

A department member since 2010, he also was honored last year with a Mississippi Arts Commission Fellowship Grant.

“This latest recognition of Dom’s work not only supports the outstanding research reputation of the university, but also helps us continue to push our students to greater excellence,” said Angi E. Bourgeois, department head.

MSU is home to the Magnolia State’s largest undergraduate studio art program, and the department is makings plans for a master of fine arts degree in photography, Bourgeois said. Lippillo’s achievements “help demonstrate further the strength of our photography concentration,” she added.

Lippillo is a 2005 fine arts/photography graduate of Youngstown (Ohio) State University, with a master’s degree in the major completed at Ohio University. For more biographical information, see www.caad.msstate.edu/art/artdirectory.php.

His photographic and video creations explore aspects of memory, the domestic and space-versus-place, with works now in permanent collections at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas, Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, California, and the universities of Alabama and North Dakota.

MSU’s art department is part of College of Architecture, Art and Design, online at www.caad.msstate.edu.

See the article at msstate.edu.

See the story in the Maroon Memo.

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