Architecture professor Alexis Gregory has paper accepted into BTES summer conference

April 17th, 2013 Comments Off on Architecture professor Alexis Gregory has paper accepted into BTES summer conference

Alexis Gregory’s paper, “Teaching Building Technology Through Haptic Learning Techniques,” has been accepted into the 2013 Building Technology Educators’ Society (BTES) conference.

Gregory, AIA, is an assistant professor in the School of Architecture at MSU. Her paper will be presented at the conference, which will be held on July 12-13 at Roger Williams University in Bristol, R.I.

Papers that best matched this year’s conference theme of “Teaching Tectonics” were chosen and blind-reviewed by three peers.

Paper Abstract:
“Students struggle to understand concepts and the application of those concepts when they are only engaged in a lecture hall. The proliferation of only visual and verbal learning techniques is not enough to help our students understand the materials and technologies necessary in architecture. Haptic learning techniques take the visual and verbal and make it real for our students. This paper posits that the addition of haptic learning techniques in construction technology classes will not only strengthen the connection between the visual and the actual, but also create more opportunities to teach the materials and technologies our students will need to become successful architects. The traits of Millennial students and how those traits can be harnessed to integrate haptic learning in construction technology courses will be discussed, as well as courses that have implemented these ideas and techniques.

Construction technology courses teach the traits of materials and the construction detailing of those materials in relation to the architectural design. Student projects range from scaled structural models to help students understand the limitations and connections of the materials and structural systems to full scale details of structural connections that help students better understand all of the decisions inherent in design and its impact on the architecture. Smaller scale projects allow a different level of haptic experience by giving the students the opportunity to both design and construct their ideas. These haptic learning techniques not only help the students better understand design and its relationship to construction, but also their integrated relationship and how important it is they work together to create beautiful architecture.”

Students get design-build experience, learn collaboration with museum project

April 11th, 2013 Comments Off on Students get design-build experience, learn collaboration with museum project

Approximately 100 MSU students from the College of Architecture, Art and Design participated in the design and construction of the Green Building Technology Demonstration Pavilion at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville. Photo by: Megan Bean

(Story by Leah Barbour | University Relations)

STARKVILLE – A five-year collaboration among Mississippi State, Oktibbeha County and Starkville culminates Monday [April 15] with the 5 p.m. public dedication of the green technology pavilion at Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum.

Guided by three university professionals, approximately 100 students built the Green Building Technology Demonstration Pavilion at the corner of Fellowship and Russell streets in East Starkville.

Flooding at the museum motivated initial contact in 2008 between museum leaders and MSU landscape architecture faculty members. The university’s Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Architecture, Art and Design, and Extension Service, along with students majoring in architecture, art, building construction science, and landscape architecture, came together to redirect rainwater away from the building.

Cory Gallo, assistant professor of landscape architecture, said students designed and built each storm water-control mechanism.

“To our knowledge, the museum is now the only facility in the state with all these storm water management technologies at the same site,” said Brian Templeton, extension associate of landscape architecture, who helped with the project.

The rain garden, installed first, complements the ground with many native plants. In the second phase, a sand filter system was added to remove common pollutants from runoff. Then, ground swales were installed to direct storm water flow, and in phase four, a 1,000-gallon cistern was put in place to hold rainwater.

The pavilion, constructed with repurposed materials and a green roof, represented the project’s final phase.

“The green technologies on the site, including the green roof, attempt to mimic how rain would have left the site in a forested condition,” Gallo said. “Green roofs also provide greater insulation and last two to three times longer than a traditional roof.”

Not only have MSU students and teachers come together to provide a sustainable solution that improves the ecology of the local environment, they’re improving quality of life, said Hans Herrmann, assistant professor of architecture.

The complex, long-term project also demonstrates to the larger world what’s possible through collaboration, he said.

“Being a research-focused land-grant university, our first priority is to demonstrate the highest potential of human creation and model it, so everyone else can see how to make their lives better,” Herrmann said. “The project has been fundamental to us in being able to bring about that change in an accessible and appreciable way. People can see how to use the green technology to empower them and show them they’re in charge of how they want to live.”

All the students who participated in the project gained what is known as “design-build” experience, an emerging trend in architecture, landscape architecture and building construction science study, Herrmann explained. Students get real-world work experience and see the results of their efforts.

“From my point of view, the most critical tool they’re learning is the ability to realize a design; that it doesn’t necessarily rely on an endless budget, but on the skill of the designer to creatively adapt,” he said.

Students completed every task and phase of the project except operating heavy machinery, Templeton said. In addition to gaining leadership experience, they learned how to follow specifications and maintain safety in a public space, he said.

“Students often never get that hands-on experience — coming up with a design and seeing how it comes together,” Gallo said. “The project, in many ways, was a puzzle and really required a lot of working through problems quickly. Design is being influenced by what’s in front of you; it makes it more real.”

As Herrmann and Gallo have spent many weekends working on the project during the past five years, so have many students, even though they weren’t receiving class credit for doing more work.

“It’s really heartening to see students coming and doing extra work because they think it’s the right thing to do, not because anyone told them to or forced them to, but because they wanted to,” Herrmann said. “It’s nice to see students doing that.”

Watch the video on WCBI from the dedication.

Check out the slideshow with photos by Meagan Bean!

Lots of fun at Beaux Arts Ball 2013

April 10th, 2013 Comments Off on Lots of fun at Beaux Arts Ball 2013

(photo by Megan Bean / Mississippi State University)

(photo by Megan Bean / Mississippi State University)

(photo by Megan Bean / Mississippi State University)

(photo by Megan Bean / Mississippi State University)

The Beaux Arts Ball, hosted by the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) and presented by the College of Architecture, Art and Design, was held on April 5.

The ball was held at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum and showcased recent work done to the pavilion by architecture, building construction science, art and landscape architecture students.

Entertainment included a live band of fourth-year architecture students (Jordan Gill, John Thomas, Nick Purvis and Zach Carnegie), and about 130 people were present, including MSU deans and faculty members.

“In one word, the event was awesome!” said Bill Poe, a longtime supporter/contributor to the museum and the pavilion project and retired MSU faculty Member. “This was the perfect place for these students to have their annual ball – in a place THEY built.”

Poe, who has also served on the Board of the Friends of the Museum, said, “The museum is very lucky to be the recipients of this infused-life provided by MSU’s Architecture and Landscape Architecture departments with support from both the city and county. We feel like we have become the ‘new kid on the block’ again.”

A ribbon-cutting celebration of the completion of the green technology demonstration pavilion will be held on April 15.  All are invited.

Students present designs for Crosby Arboretum

April 10th, 2013 Comments Off on Students present designs for Crosby Arboretum

Students present their bridge and interpretive viewing platforms to the Board of the Crosby Arboretum.

Mississippi State students in Professor Hans Herrmann and Professor Robert Brzuszek’s elective course, Building Bridges: Interdisciplinary Landscape Architecture and Architecture Design and Fabrication, recently worked on designs for a bridge and interpretive viewing platform for the Crosby Arboretum.

Students in the course, which include second- and fourth-year architecture students and landscape architecture students, presented their ideas to the board of the arboretum this past weekend.

Ruth Crosby, daughter of L.O. Crosby Jr., serves on the board and was present for the presentation.

“It was so good to get to visit with Hans and students,” she said. “I found myself mulling over their ideas  the remainder of the weekend.  It’s exciting to see young, creative, enthusiastic talent.”

The arboretum board will consider the proposals with intention to work further with Professors Brzuszek and Herrmann to eventually complete a design and construct the project in the Arboretum. 

The Crosby Arboretum is a living memorial dedicated to the late L.O. Crosby Jr. Crosby was a prominent forestry figure, civic leader and philanthropist who held a deep compassion for nature. After his death, his family decided to transform the strawberry farm on Ridge Road in Picayune into an interpretive center for native plants of the Pearl River Drainage Basin. The Crosby Arboretum Foundation was established to implement this concept. A series of exhibits were designated to display plant communities typical of Southern Mississippi ecosystems. Construction began in the early 1980s, and the arboretum was dedicated to public use in 1986. In 1997, the Foundation teamed with Mississippi State University so that the Arboretum could expand their resources.

Students involved in the project include:
Devin Carr (2nd-year architecture)
Michael Davis (4th-year architecture)
Kevin Flores (2nd-year architecture)
Jerry Hill (4th-year landscape architecture)
West Pierce (2nd-year architecture)
Nick Purvis (4th-year architecture)
Cody Smith (2nd-year architecture)

Architecture, BCS students create tensile membrane structures (AKA tailgating tents)

April 9th, 2013 Comments Off on Architecture, BCS students create tensile membrane structures (AKA tailgating tents)

Second-year Building Construction Science and third-year Architecture students designed and constructed tensile membrane structures (tailgating tents) as part of their combined Structures II studio course.
The students tested their designs in The Junction and invited faculty and others to join them for an informal review.

Architecture student films chosen for Jackson film festival

April 8th, 2013 Comments Off on Architecture student films chosen for Jackson film festival

Two teams of fifth-year architecture students had documentary films selected for inclusion in Jackson’s 2013 Crossroads Film Festival.

The documentaries were produced in the fall of 2012 as part of the Theory of Urban design course under the direction of Jassen Callender, associate professor.

The documentaries were:

• “Visible(  )”
– Dennis Daniels, Nels Long and Joe Mangialardi – Documenting the impact of vacant structures in Jackson, the filmmaker talks to people who interact with these urban voids on a daily basis and asks the question: How can place be made among such voids?

• “Jackson Mobile: A New Alternative” – Taylor Coleman, George Jordan and Cody Millican – A close look at the current transportation issues in Jackson and a possible solution to reduce the amount of vehicular traffic on the streets.

The festival takes place April 11-14.

“Jackson Mobile: A New Alternative” will appear in the ‘Student Showcase’ block on Saturday, April 13 at 11 a.m. at the AM Malco, Screen C.

“Visible(  )” will air in the ‘Visually Striking’ block on April 13 at 1;15 p.m. in the PM Malco, Screen C.

Iwamoto presents final Harrison Lecture for 2012-2013

April 8th, 2013 Comments Off on Iwamoto presents final Harrison Lecture for 2012-2013

Lisa Iwamoto presents on “The Culture of Craft”

Lisa Iwamoto, principal with Craig Scott at Iwamoto Scott Architecture, discussed her arena of craft – digital fabrication – at the final Harrison Lecture for the year.

Iwamoto said her teaching and research at the University of California, Berkely, led to a book, Digital Fabrications: Architectural and Material Techniques, that celebrates the design ingenuity made possible by digital fabrication techniques and explores the methods architects use to calibrate digital designs with physical forms.

Throughout the presentation, Iwamoto focused on material type, folding and buildings. She walked the audience through several projects in which she played with using ordinary materials in extraordinary ways and also showcased some of her students’ work.

(Click below to watch video from the presentation):
Video1

Video2
Video3
Video4
Video 5

Digital fabrication is topic of NOMAS Symposium

April 8th, 2013 Comments Off on Digital fabrication is topic of NOMAS Symposium

Lisa Iwamoto (fourth from left) served as this year’s NOMAS Symposium visiting panelist.

The National Society of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS) at Mississippi State hosted a discussion on digital fabrication on Friday, April 5 as part of the annual NOMAS Symposium.

Lisa Iwamoto, principal at Iwamoto Scott Architecture and associate professor at the University of California, Berkeley, served as this year’s visiting panelist.

Questions were posed, such as “How do spatial implications occurring in the transition between a flat surface and a three-dimensional form translate to the comfort, spatial or programmatic conditions of space?” and “How could the encouragement of social inclusion lead to a change in fabricating architecture?”

Iwamoto presented a lecture following the panel discussions on “The Culture of Craft,” the final lecture for the 2012-2013 Harrison Lecture Series.

School of Architecture announces spring 2013 Final Review schedule

April 5th, 2013 Comments Off on School of Architecture announces spring 2013 Final Review schedule

A fifth-year student presents his project during fall 2012 Final Reviews.

Please call the main office at 662-325-2202 to confirm exact times and dates prior to attending.

All the following reviews will be in Giles Hall – Starkville:

First-Year Studio

Foundation Design
Monday, April 22 

1 p.m. – 5 p.m. (and probably later with an evening session)

Second-Year Studio

Boathouse: Riverwalk – Columbus
Wednesday, April 24 

9 a.m. – 5 p.m. (and probably later with an evening session)

Third-Year Studio 

Community Arts Center – Birmingham, Ala.
Tuesday, April 23

9 a.m. – 5 p.m. (and probably later with an evening session)

Fourth-Year Studio

Howlin’ Wolf Blues Museum – West Point
Thursday, April 25
8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Students were tasked with designing a museum for the Howlin’ Wolf and Mississippi Black Prairie Blues to be located in/on/around the former McClure Furniture Store in downtown West Point. Included in the program are spaces for the West Point Arts Council, Incubators for economic community development and more.

The two sections of Design IV-B will run concurrent final review sessions taking place in the Jury Room (Professor Jane Greenwood’s studio) and the S|ARC Gallery (Professor Hans Herrmann’s studio).
Detailed schedule breakdown:

Session 1 (students 1-4), 8 a.m.
10-10:15 a.m., coffee break and work swap

Session 2 (students 5-9), 10:15 a.m.
12:30-1:30 p.m., break for lunch

Session 3 (students 8-12), 1:30 p.m.
3:30-3:45 p.m., coffee break

Session 4 (students 13-15), 3:45 p.m.
5:30 p.m., close of reviews

Fifth-Year Studio 

Thesis/Comprehensive projects
Friday, April 26 

10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (and probably later with an evening session)

Saturday, April 27   
9 a.m. – 5 p.m. (and maybe later)

Still time to get tickets to the Beaux Arts Ball

April 3rd, 2013 Comments Off on Still time to get tickets to the Beaux Arts Ball

Lorrin Webb

The Beaux Arts Ball is set for Friday, April 5th from 8 p.m. – midnight. The event is being hosted by the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) and is presented by the College of Architecture, Art and Design.

The ball will take place outdoors at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in order to take advantage of the pavilion that architecture, building construction science, art and landscape architecture students have been working on diligently since last summer.

Admission is $15 and includes appetizers from City Bagel Cafe, entertainment from a live band of fourth-year architecture students (Jordan Gill, John Thomas, Nick Purvis and Zach Carnegie) and the chance to win prizes from local businesses. There will also be a cash bar.

Screen printed posters designed by graphic design student Lorrin Webb will also be on sale for $15, and a portion of the proceeds will go to Habitat for Humanity.

Come support the college, AIAS and the Heritage Museum while having a good time!

For tickets or more information, contact officers of AIAS by email:  aias.msstate@gmail.com.

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