Carl Small Town Center featured in Tupelo’s Daily Journal

January 30th, 2015 Comments Off on Carl Small Town Center featured in Tupelo’s Daily Journal

Corinth tourism wants downtown boutique hotel

By Lena Mitchell

Daily Journal Corinth Bureau

CORINTH – Corinth tourism officials want to spark interest in building a boutique hotel downtown, and the Mississippi State University Carl Small Town Center is doing the groundwork.

Corinth Area Convention and Visitors Bureau Executive Director Christy Burns and tourism council president Russell Smith met this week with MSU School of Architecture student Hannah Waycaster and Carl Small Town Center Director John Poros to review the feasibility study for the project.

“It’s been a problem for us for a long time that Corinth doesn’t have enough hotel rooms,” Smith said.

At times like the mid-March weekend when Corinth hosts a popular Bible conference at a local church and a state gymnastics meet at the Crossroads Arena, Corinth hotels are fully booked and some people who plan to attend must stay in hotels in nearby cities, he said.

The proposal Waycaster and Poros presented was developed with the help of a professor in the university’s real estate department.

It outlines a 49-room hotel to be built on one of several available properties in downtown Corinth that the team scouted. Those properties range in size from a few thousand square feet, requiring the hotel to be built vertically with several stories, to as large as more than 35,000 square feet.

“I stayed at the Alluvian Hotel in Greenwood for the Mississippi-Alabama Rural Tourism Conference, and I think something like that could work in Corinth,” Burns said.

The Alluvian is described as “a cosmopolitan boutique hotel in the heart of the Mississippi Delta,” and is situated across the street from the Viking Cooking School, which attracts visitors worldwide.

“Our hotels seem to be booked Mondays through Wednesdays,” Burns said, “but we’re trying to help sell weekends. For group tours a boutique hotel might be a target for that, or something like a girls’ weekend.”

Waycaster, under Poros’ direction, has developed several community improvement projects in Corinth, including a recently completed pocket park at the corner of Wick and Franklin streets, and a proposal for renovations at Crossroads Regional Park. A $40,000 grant from the Pierce Foundation – $10,000 a year for four years – is being used to support these projects.

Waycaster’s next step is to create a schematic design for the hotel, using a 20,000-square-foot lot to create the footprint for the design. She expects to have a design to present by early summer.

“This work will show prospective builders the feasibility of the project, but they would need to use their own people to decide on going forward with it,” Poros said.

lena.mitchell@journalinc.com

School of Architecture alumnus named ‘Engineering News-Record’ top 20 under 40

January 27th, 2015 Comments Off on School of Architecture alumnus named ‘Engineering News-Record’ top 20 under 40

(Via Perkins+Will)

Each year, Engineering News-Record magazine’s regional editions celebrate rising stars and the excellence of construction professionals.

In 2015, each region highlighted 20 individuals under the age of 40 who represent the “Best-of-the-Best” in their construction and design careers by advancing their companies and the industry and by giving back to their communities.

W. Scott Allen, Associate AIA, LEED AP BD+C, was one of these 20 recipients.

Photo credit: Perkins+Will / Genia Narinskaya

Photo credit: Perkins+Will / Genia Narinskaya

Allen, a New York-based project designer with the global architecture and design firm Perkins+Will and a 2010 graduate of the Mississippi State University School of Architecture, was also highlighted in the February 2015 Issue of  Engineering News-Record’s as a “Design Wunderkind.”

His portfolio encompasses over thirty million square feet of work throughout a broad range of building types, and most recently, his ideas and lectures have been seen in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Architectural Record, Fortune, Fast Company, CNN, USA Today, World Landscape Architecture, Bloomberg Business and various smaller publications. His work has also been exhibited in museums and art galleries nationally and abroad.

Allen’s work revolves around asking the unconventional and unique questions provoking new relationships to redefine the built environment for the next generation. His creative process has been characterized by an ideal, yet hyper, practical approach, combining rational and environmental analysis, cultural and social perspectives, and inventive formal solutions. Most recently he has completed designs on an 80-story tower in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; created an urban reorganization plan for Salt Lake City, Utah; won an international design competition for a confidential consumer goods company’s North American headquarters, securing a new net-zero office development; and he’s currently working on two 60-story luxury residential towers in midtown Manhattan, NY, and numerous other large-scale urban design and commercial projects.

Located at the intersection of design, culture and economy, Allen starts each new project free of predetermined ideas. His design process looks at architecture’s fundamental elements and their relationships to our cities, where his projects integrate commerce, sustainability, urban infrastructure, civic space, custom construction techniques, culture and occupancy issues. His practical and form-generative approach creates projects that take on inspiring solutions that meet the needs of users and are meaningful to their context.

Photo credit: Scott Allen

Photo credit: Scott Allen

Contact Scott at w.scott.allen@perkinswill.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/wscotta

CAAD to host panel discussion in conjunction with spring MSU Career Days

January 27th, 2015 Comments Off on CAAD to host panel discussion in conjunction with spring MSU Career Days

The College of Architecture, Art, and Design will host a special career presentation panel discussion for students in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium (Giles Hall) following the MSU Career Fair on Feb. 4 at 4:30 p.m.

Panelists include:
• Ann Somers, AIA, Principal, CDFL Architects + Engineers, P.A.

• Mary Beth McDavid, Creative Director, DPM Fragrance

• Adam Moore, Montgomery Martin Contractors, LLC

• Ashley Hughes, NCIDQ, LEED AP BD+C, Certified Interior Designer MS & FL, Pryor & Morrow Architects & Engineers

A reception will follow at 5:30 p.m. for students and professionals in Giles Hall.

The Spring MSU Career Days will be held Feb. 3 (business and non-technical organizations) and Feb. 4 (engineering and technical organizations) from noon – 4 p.m. in the Humphrey Coliseum on MSU’s Starkville campus.

If you have any questions about MSU Career Days, please contact our representative with the Career Center, Ryan Colvin, rcolvin@career.msstate.edu or 662-325-3344.

TSD to host Jure Kotnik’s ‘Container Architecture Exhibition’

January 27th, 2015 Comments Off on TSD to host Jure Kotnik’s ‘Container Architecture Exhibition’

CONTAINER ARCHITECTURE POSTER.indd

The School of Architecture’s Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society (TSD) will host Jure Kotnik’s “Container Architecture Exhibition” from Jan. 28 through Feb. 25.

An opening reception for the exhibit will be held on Feb. 2 at 5:15 p.m.

Jure Kotnik’s widely acclaimed exhibit that explores the rising trend of shipping container architecture. The exhibit showcases the most high profile container projects from around the globe.

The exhibition features the work of Adam Kalkin (USA), AFF Architekten (Germany), DeMaria Design Associates (USA), HVDN Architecten (Netherlands), Hybrid (USA), Knock.Se (Sweden), Lot-Ek (USA), Luc Deleu (Belgium), MMW Architects (Norway), Nicholas Lacey & Partners (UK), Phooey Architects (Australia), Pierre Morency Architecten (Canada), Platoon + Graft (Germany), Shigeru Ban Architects (Japan), Spillmann-Echsle (Swiss), Spillmann-Felser (Swiss), Will Alsop Design Ltd. (UK) and Jure Kotnik (Slovenia).

Download the poster.

Gregory to present at CASLE Mini-Grants Workshop

January 20th, 2015 Comments Off on Gregory to present at CASLE Mini-Grants Workshop

Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory, AIA, will present at the CASLE Mini-Grants Workshop on Thurs., Feb. 5, from 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. in 1405 Presentation Room at the Mitchell Memorial Library.

The workshop will provide an overview of the service-learning mini-grant program offered by the Center for the Advancement of Service-Learning Excellence (CASLE) including the mini-grant application process and examples of funded service-learning projects.

Gregory received a service-learning grant in the past and will share about her project.

Service-Learning Advisory Committee members will also discuss the best ways to write proposals that will be funded.

For more information, visit servicelearning.msstate.edu

Panelists named for upcoming Houston rural design workshop

January 13th, 2015 Comments Off on Panelists named for upcoming Houston rural design workshop

panelists

Four panelists have been selected from across the country to serve as resource team experts for the upcoming Citizen’s Institute for Rural Design workshop in Houston, Miss., from February 22-24.

  • Andrew Barresi of Massachusetts, principal at Roll Baressi & Associates, will serve as graphic designer for wayfinding and signage around the community.
  • Heather Deutsch of Washington, D.C., sustainable transportation planner at Toole Design Group, will serve as cycling advocate and Rails-to_Trails expert.
  • Keith Holt of Wisconsin, southeast region director at Wisconsin Bicycle Federation, will serve as the project’s community engagement specialist and bicycle advocate.
  • Brice Maryman, ASLA, PLA, CPSI, LEED AP, of Washington, landscape architect and lecturer at the University of Washington, will serve as the landscape architect for the project.

Houston was one of just four communities nationwide to receive a 2014 CIRD Award funded by the National Endowment for the Arts. The award will fund the upcoming workshop, which will serve to gather ideas from the Houston community and its leaders about the Tanglefoot Trailhead in Houston. Houston is the southernmost community along the Tanglefoot Trail, a cycling/pedestrian pathway that runs from New Albany south through Pontotoc and Chickasaw County.

The Carl Small Town Center, one of two research centers housed in Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art, and Design, will host the workshop, which has the main goal of creating plans to lead visitors from the Tanglefoot Trail to Houston’s downtown area and to connect the trail to the nearby Natchez Trace Parkway.

“We are excited to have this esteemed group of experts to help Houston realize its potential at the trailhead of the Tanglefoot Trail,” said Leah Kemp, assistant director of the CSTC. “Each of these resource team members will provide a skill-set that will be beneficial to help envision and design a great place for Houston.”

The free workshop, open to the Houston community, will kick off with an event in the afternoon on Sun., Feb. 22, at the Houston Trailhead. The remainder of the workshop will take place at the Houston Civic Center.

Expert Biographies:

  • Andrew Barresi is in charge of the overall management of Roll Barresi & Associates and directs the firm’s design efforts. He has served as project manager for sign and wayfinding programs for Johns Hopkins University, the City of Newport, Duke University, Peabody Essex Museum, The Arnold Arboretum and Harvard Business School. He is an honors graduate of Wentworth Institute of Technology (civil engineering, 1987) and Massachusetts College of Art (graphic design, 1997). He previously served as graphics coordinator for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, responsible for the design of graphic systems for the Authority in metropolitan Boston and surrounding cities and towns. He also managed the MBTA’s public arts program, “Arts on the Line” and ADA accessibility standards. Barresi’s work on the city of Newport sign program has received an Annual Design Award from the Society for Environmental Graphic Designers. His work has been published in SEGD Design and Architectural Record.
  • Heather Deutsch has worked on bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure projects for the past ten years for the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, Washington, D.C.’s Department of Transportation and most recently Toole Design Group.  In addition to providing design assistance on hundreds of private and public transportation and public space plans, she has managed trail projects from land acquisition to design and on to construction.  At the Rails-to-Trails Conversancy, Deutsch led a team that provided legal, acquisition, economic and design assistance to municipalities throughout the U.S.  Previous urban planning work focused on under-served communities in redeveloping historic neighborhoods. Deutsch holds a master’s degree in urban and regional planning from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and a Bachelor of Arts in the History of Math, Science and Philosophy.  She has traveled to 35 countries and bicycled across the country at the age of 13.
  • Keith Holt has worked for more than five years for the Chicagoland Bicycle Federation (now Active Transportation Alliance). In that role, he served in a community liaison capacity, developing and maintaining relationships with the African-American communities throughout Chicago and working to gain support for the organizations’ programs in those areas. Since moving to Milwaukee in 2007, he has brought his personal mission to the neighborhood where he lives and continues with the formation of Milwaukee Bicycle Works. He also serves on several board and committees. He is chairman of Milwaukee Bike Ped Task Force, serves on the Washington Park Partners Steering Committee and is a board member for the Bicycle Federation of Wisconsin. His specialties include urban trails and greenways, livable communities, cycling advocacy, event coordination/facilitation, youth development, bicycling in communities of color and urban built environment.
  • Brice Maryman is an award-winning landscape architect at SvR Design Company in Seattle. Whether working on children’s playgrounds or public streetscapes, he is passionately concerned with the vitality and health of natural and cultural ecosystems. In addition to his work at SvR, he currently serves in a leadership role on the board of Seattle Parks Commissioners. He co-founded the University of Washington’s Urban Green Infrastructure Certificate Program and co-directed the ASLA award-winning Open Space Seattle 2100 project with Nancy Rottle.  Maryman has been involved with several local organizations including the Great City, the Arboretum Foundation and the Friends of Seattle’s Olmsted Parks. This involvement continues his deep commitment to balancing environmental and cultural values within the urban environment. He recently served as chair of the Technical Advisory Committee for Planning and Design for the STAR Community Index.

The Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design (CIRD) is a National Endowment for the Arts leadership initiative in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Project for Public Spaces Inc. along with the Orton Family Foundation and the CommunityMatters® Partnership. Established in 1991, CIRD has convened more than 60 rural design workshops in all regions of the country, empowering residents to leverage local assets in order to build better places to live, work, and play. For more information visit www.rural-design.org.

Watch the video on WCBI

Read more about the Houston’s Citizen’s Institute for Rural Design Award on Mississippi State University’s Website.

2014 Citizen’s Institute for Rural Design Award recipients

For more about the Carl Small Town Center, visit carlsmalltowncenter.org.

The MSU College of Architecture, Art and Design is online at caad.msstate.edu.

Read the story on MSU’s website and at WCBI.com.

Housing revitalization project celebrated by MSU, community leaders

January 5th, 2015 Comments Off on Housing revitalization project celebrated by MSU, community leaders

 

New homeowners in Baptist Town celebrated the opening of their new residencies at a Friday [Dec. 19] ceremony in Greenwood, while community leaders congratulated them.

New homeowners in Baptist Town celebrated the opening of their new residencies at a Friday [Dec. 19] ceremony in Greenwood, while community leaders congratulated them.

By Leah Barbour | MSU

After 13 years of continuing collaborative efforts, led by Mississippi State University’s Carl Small Town Center, 10 families in a historically African-American neighborhood in the Mississippi Delta are realizing the dream of homeownership.

Baptist Town, famous for being a residence of blues legend Robert Johnson and Oscar-winner Morgan Freeman, is a culturally rich community in east Greenwood. However, because of challenges related to high unemployment and rising crime rates, similar to many Delta neighborhoods, quality of life in Baptist Town declined as the economy weakened.

Greenwood native Fred E. Carl Jr., a former MSU architecture major and major university benefactor who founded Viking Range Corp., funded a grant in 2001 for MSU Small Town Center leaders to develop a master plan for Baptist Town revitalization. The plan, completed in 2003 when Carl endowed the center as the Carl Small Town Center, identified the community’s key needs as affordable and functional housing, safer public spaces and improved infrastructure.

Following the formation of a new coalition among the center, Greenwood-Leflore-Carroll Economic Development Foundation, the Foundation for the Midsouth and other community organizations in 2009, an updated master plan was released in 2010.

This plan won the 2011 Outstanding Student Project award of the American Planning Association. In 2012, the center was selected as one of only four organizations in the country to host a national Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow, Emily Roush Elliott. She, as an employee of MSU’s center and the local development foundation, was tasked with implementing the major components of the award-winning Baptist Town master plan.

On Friday [Dec. 19], one of her major responsibilities–bringing affordable housing to Baptist Town–was realized. Ten families have begun moving into brand new homes, and they are excited about their new roles as homebuyers, Elliott said. The community celebrated with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

“The neighborhood here has been a strong partner as we’ve provided education for these new homeowners,” she said. “None of these new homes are for rent or for lease; we just divide out what we invest in the project, and we sell it for that much.”

New homeowners in Baptist Town include Dorothy Russell, James Melvin Williams, Brenda Gray, David Lee Thomas, Mable Miller, Lora and Michael Gallion, Shakera Harris, Earlene Smith, Mattie Brown and Betty Montgomery.

The new homes come on the heels of some of Elliott’s other major accomplishments in Baptist Town. A children’s play park was renovated, and a pocket park with seating and lighting was created for local residents. Also, sidewalks, streetlights, signage and landscaping have improved the community’s appearance.

Elliott’s next major goal is the development of a community center. The space will become a place to foster youth education and community activities, she said.

“I feel like this is a project that just keeps giving,” she said. “The greatest moment hasn’t probably even happened yet. But installing these houses and watching people move in–it’s the biggest moment so far.”

More information about the Carl Small Town Center, the service arm of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design, is available at http://carlsmalltowncenter.org/

Watch the video.

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