School of Architecture, ICAA to host classical architecture workshop

February 24th, 2015 Comments Off on School of Architecture, ICAA to host classical architecture workshop

Poster Design: Jeanz Holt | ICAA

Poster Design: Jeanz Holt | ICAA

The Institute of Classical Architecture and Art (ICAA) in conjunction with the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University is pleased to announce the Dan and Gemma Camp Workshop in Classical Architectural Design. The program is made possible by an endowed gift from founder and developer of Starkville’s Cotton District development Dan and Gemma Camp as well as generous gifts from Briar and Michelle Jones and Duncan-Williams Inc. Investment Bankers.

Participation in this FREE workshop will provide 6 CEUs:
• Friday afternoon: 2 regular LUs and 2 HSW LUs (Register here)
• Saturday: 2 LUs (Register here)

Open to friends of the School of Architecture, builders, practicing architects and MSU students, this workshop will provide an introduction to the practice of classical architectural design.

A series of presentations beginning early in the afternoon of Friday, March 20 and continuing through March 21 (see schedule below), will be held in Starkville, MS, at the School of Architecture and will introduce the language and principles of classical architectural design and traditional urbanism and its practice today. The day will conclude with a guided tour of Starkville’s historic Cotton District and a dinner reception at MSU’s Hunter Henry Center.

On Saturday, participants will have an opportunity to explore in greater depth the language of classical design through drawing and examine examples of classical design on the campus of Mississippi State.

The program will be presented by practitioners and educators active in the field of classical design.

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Schedule

Events will be held in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium in Giles Hall – 899 Collegeview Street, Mississippi State, MS 39762 – unless otherwise noted.

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (2 regular LUs and 2 HSW LUs)
1:00 – 1:15 pm           Welcome and Introduction – Michael Berk + ICAA
1:15 – 2:00                  A Classical Primer – ICAA
2:00 – 2:45                 Elements of Classical Architecture – ICAA
Break
3:00 – 3:45                 The Practice and Craft of Classical Architectural Design – ICAA
3:45 – 4:30                 Making Places: Buildings and Public Spaces– ICAA
4:30 – 6:30                 Tour of the Cotton District – Michael Fazio, Dan Camp, ICAA Members
6:30  – until                Dinner and Reception at the Hunter Henry Center, MSU Campus

Click here to register for Friday. 

(Remember, the event is FREE, but you must register. Please bring a sketch pad to this session. Minimum size: 8.5 x 11″).

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SATURDAY, March 21, 2015 (2 LUs)
10 am – noon                Introduction to Classical Elements
Field Study and Drawing – Classical Architecture on the MSU campus

Click here to register for Saturday. 

(Remember, the event is FREE, but you must register. Please bring a sketch pad to this session. Minimum size: 8.5 x 11″).

Download the poster.

 

WCBI features Carl Small Town Center workshop

February 24th, 2015 Comments Off on WCBI features Carl Small Town Center workshop


The Carl Small Town Center, one of two research centers housed in the College of Architecture, Art and Design, hosted the Citizen’s Institute for Rural Design workshop in Houston, Miss., from February 22-24.

The main goal of the workshop was to create plans to lead visitors from the Tanglefoot Trail to Houston’s downtown area and to connect the trail to the nearby Natchez Trace Parkway.

Materials class visits Columbus Brick

February 23rd, 2015 Comments Off on Materials class visits Columbus Brick

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A group of 40 students in Assistant Professor Jacob Gines’ materials class recently visited Columbus Brick Company in Columbus.

A special thanks to Butch Reed, sales manager, who coordinated a tour of the plant’s entire operation for the group, which included a look at the raw materials as well as explanations of the processes of mixtures and molding, how the bricks are manufactured and the firing process.

This is the third year Gines has taken his class on a trip to Columbus Brick.

“It’s so wonderful the way they interact with the students,” he said. “For them to see the manual and then the mechanized part is pretty incredible.”

He said the highlight of this trip was at the end of the tour when students were able to work alongside four experienced brick masons who were invited to conduct a workshop and demonstration.

Students were challenged to build a temporary brick wall.

“Parts of it were not that great,” laughed Gines. “But that’s to be expected.”

Gines said he was especially glad his students were able to see the pride the masons take in their craft.

“What a wonderful opportunity to get some hands-on experience and to understand and appreciate the work of masons and that it’s extremely skilled work and not something everyone can do.”

CAAD hosts annual career panel discussion

February 5th, 2015 Comments Off on CAAD hosts annual career panel discussion

In conjunction with MSU’s Career Days, the College of Architecture, Art and Design held a panel discussion with representatives from the college’s four areas of study (architecture, art, interior design and building construction science.)

The panel was held on Feb. 4 from 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium in Giles Hall. A reception followed immediately after the question-and-answer session.

Beth Miller, director of the Interior Design Program, severed as moderator.

Panelists included:

• Architecture: Ann Somers, AIA, Principal, CDFL Architects + Engineers, P.A. Somers serves on the School of Architecture Advisory Board and is a 1981 graduate.
• Art: Mary Beth McDavid, Creative Director, DPM Fragrance
• Building Construction Science: Adam Moore and Trey Jacobs, Project Managers, Montgomery Martin Contractors, LLC. Jacobs and Moore graduated from the Building Construction Science Program in 2013.
• Interior Design: Ashley Hughes, NCIDQ, LEED AP BD+C, Certified Interior Designer MS & FL, Pryor & Morrow Architects & Engineers. Hughes is a 2007 graduate of the Interior Design Program.

The panel began with general introductions.

CAAD Career Panel from CAADatMSU on Vimeo.

Then, Miller, asked the first question: What do you look at in a potential new hire?

  • Moore said the most important thing is a good attitude and how you carry yourself. He also said being able to communicate is important.
  • Jacobs said he looks for experience of any type.
  • McDavid looks for candidates that have an “entrepreneurial spirit.” “We try to get an idea if a candidate can manage a project.” She encouraged students to have a job while in school and be involved to show they can balance work and school.
  • Hughes said, “how you carry yourself.” She said candidates should show confidence and also be open to learning from others. She encouraged students to ask questions and added that organization is also important.
  • Somers said the first look at a new candidate is the resume and letter. She said her firm looks at the graphics and tries to see if the candidate’s style matches the firm. Therefore, she encouraged students to match their resume to the firm. Somers said different things stand out to her – sometimes GPA, sometimes experience, sometimes design work. She said she loves when students say they are going to follow up with a phone call, and they actually follow through. She said her firm always brings in those candidates at least for a meeting.

Next, students were given the chance to ask questions.

What is your favorite part of the design process?

  • Somers said she enjoys the fact that as an architect, she gets to learn something new every day. She also enjoys collaboration with a team.
  • Hughes finds the most important part of her job is to make sure the client is happy with what her company provides. She said she enjoys the time after meeting with a client when she gets to work on developing the solution to the design problem.
  • McDavid enjoys customer interaction and agreed with Hughes that it’s enjoyable to solve a design problem. She also said it’s very rewarding to see a product she had a part in designing sitting on a retail shelf and being promoted internationally.
  • Moore said he doesn’t really have as much to do with the design process but enjoys that owners value his opinion on budget issues and being cost-effective with projects.

What are some of the responsibilities of a junior designer?

  • Hughes recalled a time at her first company when she was invited to lunch with the CEO. He told her that the number one thing he wanted her to do for him while working at the company was to learn. She agreed that the number one goal when starting a job should be to be willing to learn and have a willing attitude. “They will put into you what you are trying to get out of it,” she said, adding “You are just as much in control of your future as the person you work for, and that’s a really powerful thing.” Hughes also said that interior designers should expect to do a lot of drafting, and she praised the MSU Interior Design program for training her in Revit – something she said gave her a leg up in her first job.
  • McDavid said that the majority of their new hires are in their first job out of school. She said she loves that they are “not afraid to just jump in and run with it.” She encouraged everyone to take ownership and show initiative in projects and not to come in thinking of a position as a junior position. “Have the attitude of ‘what will I know in a month, and how can I make myself valuable to the company.'”
  • Somers added that students now are coming in with new skills that they are able to teach employees who have been working at companies longer.
  • Jacobs told students that entry-level jobs in his field involve a lot of paperwork. “They’ll put as much on you as you show you can handle. It’s a lot of on-the-job training,” he said, adding that the more you are willing to take on and learn, the quicker you will move up.
  • McDavid added that new hires shouldn’t be discouraged by having to do paperwork or the more mundane parts of a project. “Own those with passion,” she said.

What makes an employee the most valuable to a team?

  • Hughes said it’s important to be able to count on a team member – that a project will get done and get done correctly. She also said it’s important to be able to trust a team member.
  • Somers said, “Attitude is key,” adding that it’s important to be thorough, and that that’s often something that has to be learned – often through a more senior mentor.
  • McDavid values a team member who is able to take feedback, listen, ask questions, and apply it all.
  • Moore said it’s important to have initiative and a good attitude. “Go learn from the guy next to you,” he said.

(Directed toward construction representatives) What factors led toward your decision to work for a medium-sized contractor?

  • Moore and Jacobs both credited the decision partly on family and wanting to not move around as much. Moore added that he would have “felt like just another guy – a number” at a larger company, adding with pride that Mr. Montgomery Martin walks by him every day and knows him by name.
  • Hughes said her first company was medium-sized, and she values that she was able to get so much one-on-one training. “The most important thing I feel like I can tell you is in your interview process, try to gauge if they have a mentorship program because that is what is going to help you the most to further your career,” she said.
  • Somers said she has had the opportunity to travel and work at both large and small firms. She encouraged students to do the same. “I don’t think you’ll totally know what you want until you are immersed in it,” she said

(Directed toward architecture representative) What are the advantages of working for a large firm?

  • Somers said large firms usually have teams that work on culture and put more into training. “They have a different way they distribute work, and the mechanics are just different.” She also said how you rise to success is different in a large firm because there is usually stiff competition, which she said can often push you more.

The panel discussion ended with a final question from the moderator: What are some tips for the interview process?

Tips for an inteview – Adam Moore from CAADatMSU on Vimeo.

  • Jacobs: Be able to elaborate, be able to communicate, and be well-rounded.
  • McDavid: Ask questions and be conversational (not just one-word answers).
  • Hughes: “First impressions are key.” Know about the company, and know what your future goals are.
  • Somers: Her current firm (CDFL) looks to see if you are a good fit for the firm and will ask questions about your priorities in life and work. They want it to be a good fit for you as well. “Think about who you are interviewing with and know where you want to head in your career. You want the firm to want you as much as you want the job.” Somers added that larger firms seem to have more clear-cut interviews, and it’s good to have a salary and benefits in mind for the interview.

School of Architecture, TSD hold reception for ‘Container Architecture Exhibition’

February 4th, 2015 Comments Off on School of Architecture, TSD hold reception for ‘Container Architecture Exhibition’

A reception was held on Feb. 2 for the current exhibition on display in the Giles Gallery.

The School of Architecture’s Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society (TSD) will host Jure Kotnik’s “Container Architecture Exhibition” through Feb. 25.

Jure Kotnik’s widely acclaimed exhibit explores the rising trend of shipping container architecture. The exhibit showcases the most high profile container projects from around the globe.

The exhibition features the work of Adam Kalkin (USA), AFF Architekten (Germany), DeMaria Design Associates (USA), HVDN Architecten (Netherlands), Hybrid (USA), Knock.Se (Sweden), Lot-Ek (USA), Luc Deleu (Belgium), MMW Architects (Norway), Nicholas Lacey & Partners (UK), Phooey Architects (Australia), Pierre Morency Architecten (Canada), Platoon + Graft (Germany), Shigeru Ban Architects (Japan), Spillmann-Echsle (Swiss), Spillmann-Felser (Swiss), Will Alsop Design Ltd. (UK) and Jure Kotnik (Slovenia).

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