Hamilton presents research lunch and learn

October 30th, 2015 Comments Off on Hamilton presents research lunch and learn

IMG_1112 web

Associate Vice President for Research J.A. “Drew” Hamilton Jr., Ph.D.

Associate Vice President for Research J.A. “Drew” Hamilton Jr., Ph.D., presented a lunch and learn to faculty and staff in the College of Architecture, Art and Design on Oct. 30.

Hamilton discussed research resources for faculty within the Office of Research and Economic Development (ORED).

One particular resource his office provides is research publicity through Jim Laird, research editor.

Hamilton then explained the FY 2015 funding initiatives, which include faculty research support, cross-college research grants (Joint DAFVM) and undergraduate research programs.

“ORED is here to help,” said Hamilton, explaining the office’s many research support units, which include the Office of Research Compliance (which includes human-subjects research), Office of Environmental Health and Safety, Office of Lab Animal Resources, Office of Sponsored Programs Administration, Office of Technology Management and the Office of Research Security.

Hamilton gave several research funding pointers.

He encouraged faculty to find opportunities early and make personal contact with program managers.

“Stay late,” he said, adding that faculty can then make those key contacts and ask questions after workshops and other events are over.

Another pointer he gave was to “face rejection and prepare for round two.”

“Rejection is part of being an academic,” said Hamilton, adding that he has only been funded on the first try a few times.

Additional pointers included getting help from experienced researchers and drafting your own budget – then having it checked and corrected by appropriate staff.

Hamilton ended the presentation with extramural funding suggestions.

He told faculty to be willing to work with others and find something interesting they can actually do.

He also stressed the importance of having senior faculty on a team to increase credibility of a proposal.

“Think outside the box,” he said. “Not everything is an exact fit for what you are looking for.”

He added, laughing, “No one fails tenure because they brought in too much extramural funding.”

Collaborative Studio researches Japanese teahouses, treated to ceremony demonstration

October 28th, 2015 Comments Off on Collaborative Studio researches Japanese teahouses, treated to ceremony demonstration

Traditional Japanese tea ceremony demonstration from CAADatMSU on Vimeo.

Chieko Iwata, MSU’s Japan outreach coordinator, recently visited the second-year Collaborative Studio.

Her visit included a lecture on traditional Japanese teahouses and a demonstration of a traditional Japanese tea ceremony.

This experience will assist both the architecture and building construction science students in the fall Collaborative Studio with their own design of a contemporary teahut.

These designs will be shared at the final reviews at the end of November. View the final review schedule here.

School of Architecture Advisory Board meets

October 27th, 2015 Comments Off on School of Architecture Advisory Board meets

The Advisory Board for the School of Architecture met on Mon., Oct. 26 in the Shackouls Executive Board Room in the Hunter Henry Center on campus.

Members of the board came together to discuss issues affecting the school.

The group was introduced to Associate Dean Greg G. Hall, who presented an update on the College of Architecture, Art and Design.

Mississippi State University Provost and Executive Vice President Jerome A. “Jerry” Gilbert also presented an update on the university and entertained a question and answer session with the group.

Faculty joined the board for discussions during lunch, and fourth-year student Zach Henry presented a video showing work from the fall 2014 Collaborative Studio.

Following lunch, CAAD Director of Development P.K. Thomas discussed fundraising and gift opportunities.

When the meeting adjourned, the group was invited to visit with students in studio in Giles Hall.

Design studio director to present next Harrison lecture

October 27th, 2015 Comments Off on Design studio director to present next Harrison lecture

Gulf Coast Community Design Center (GCCDS) - Biloxi Katrina recovery architecture and landscape architecture - for Foundation Annual Report

David Perkes

By Zach Plair | Mississippi State University

David Perkes is looking beyond rebuilding and focusing more on resilience.

As founding director for Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio in Biloxi, he plans to promote the studio’s forward-thinking design philosophy when he visits the Starkville campus Friday [Oct. 30] as part of the MSU School of Architecture’s Robert and Freda Harrison Endowed Visiting Lecture Series. He will speak at 4 p.m. in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium at Giles Hall.

MSU established the design studio in Biloxi as an outreach program of the College of Architecture, Art and Design in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Its staff of professional designers has worked with communities, non-profit organizations and residents to rebuild or repair hundreds of homes, as well as reclaim landscape along the storm-ravaged Gulf Coast. Through a thoughtful, design initiative that closely involves stakeholders, Perkes said, the center aims to promote community sustainability.

The studio has earned numerous regional and national awards, and has been named a National Resilience Design Studio by the American Institute of Architects and Rockefeller foundations.

“The focus isn’t just on rebuilding after Katrina,” Perkes said. “It’s about making strong, resilient coastal communities.”

Started in 2009 with a gift from the Harrisons, the visiting lecture series invites architects, academics, artists, makers and theoreticians from the U.S. and around the world to the MSU campus to present their work and interact with students, said Michael Berk, School of Architecture director and F.L. Crane Professor. The series typically hosts about 10 lecturers annually, he added.

“The intention of the visiting series is to bring cutting-edge ideas from around the world and the academy to our students and faculty in Starkville,” Berk said. “These inspiring presentations have an amazing impact on our students — it opens their eyes to the possibilities beyond the horizon. These visitors also get a glimpse of the amazing work our students and faculty are doing, helping to enhance our external reputations.”

A former director for the Jackson Community Design Center, where he taught fifth-year architecture students, Perkes won the Latrobe Prize in 2011 and served as Loeb Fellow in 2003-04.

Perkes said he hopes his lecture gives students at MSU’s Starkville campus a better understanding of the design studio’s work and inspires them to become involved.

Check out the recent video featuring Perkes and the Gulf Coast Community Design Studio.

Fourth-year architecture studio holds review

October 27th, 2015 Comments Off on Fourth-year architecture studio holds review

(Via Jake Gines)

Assistant Professor Jacob Gines’ fourth-year studio recently held a review this coming in the Giles Hall Gallery.

This semester, the studio is examining the role of heavy timber tectonics in contemporary architecture – primarily focusing on structure as scaffolding and façade as skin.

Students are engaging this topic from a historic perspective and researching the significance and varied application of these tectonic manifestations through an introduction to some tectonic theory and precedent.

The scholarly study of the tekton (carpenter or builder) and the discourse surrounding the notion of tectonics received much attention throughout the late 1800’s and continues to exist as a critical endeavor today. It can be argued that at the heart of tectonic inquiry is the idea and application of poesis, ‘to make’. This constructed attitude will motivate the students to express their research and design attitude through a series of iterative exercises, which will be visualized using palimpsestic drawing and additive modeling.

Proposals are for a speculative building sited in Manhattan, NY at 104 West 57th Street.

Topics addressed in this review include:

  • Order
  • Organization
  • Structure
  • Tectonics: Mass. Plane, Frame
  • Frampton: Studies in Tectonic Culture

The final review for this studio will be held on Tues., Dec. 1 from 9-6 p.m. Please call the school at 662-325-2202 if you plan to attend and to confirm times.

School of Architecture announces fall 2015 jury schedule

October 27th, 2015 Comments Off on School of Architecture announces fall 2015 jury schedule

DSC_0008 copy

All are invited to the School of Architecture’s fall 2015 Jury Reviews.

NOTE: All times are subject to a bit of change (due to the nature of the review process) along with breaks for lunch. Please call to confirm and let us know you are coming. Giles: 662-325-2202; Jackson Center: 601-354-6480

Fifth-Year Final Jury Schedule (Jackson)

NOTE: Jury to be in the 5th-Year Jackson Center, 509 Capitol Street. Please call first to confirm times. 601-354-6480

  • Thurs., Nov. 19 9-6 p.m. (w/ possible evening session)  
    “Stitching the Urban Fabric” | Jackson Center Director: Jassen Callender

    Project #1: Constructing a Civic Artifact. (Teams of two) Students designed and construct full-scale sheet metal doors for an unprogrammed but significant civic building. Through this work, students were expected to formulate a response to the question, “how do individual things join into a larger, more meaningful, whole.”

    Project #2: Conceiving a Patch. (Teams of four to five) Students conducted site analyses, documented the figure-ground relationships, and constructed a digital site model that accurately represents the area bounded by Amite Street (north), Adams Street (west), Pearl Street (south), and Roach Street (east). At the conclusion of the Theory of Urban Design intensive course, students worked to develop master plan proposals for this rail viaduct district. These proposals should address issues of program, form, and social justice.

    Project #3: Stitching. (Individual) Each student will select a site within his or her team’s master plan for the design of an Archive for the new Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. This is not a destination for tourists. The facility is intended to serve local, national, and international scholars, provide community meeting spaces, and, of course, house the state’s most significant Civil Rights artifacts. The latter function as well as the building’s symbolic importance demands a robust response, both structurally and perceptually. These designs must incorporate the student’s sheet metal door, without modification, and serve as a test of his or her thesis statement on the role of architecture in the making of a city.

  • Fri., Nov. 20 9-6 p.m. (w/ possible evening session)  
    “Stitching the Urban Fabric” (continued)

First through Fourth-Year Final Jury Schedule (Starkville)

NOTE: Jury to be in Giles Hall, Starkville (Giles Gallery and/or Fazio Jury Room) Please call first to confirm times. 662-325-2202

  • Mon., Nov. 23, 9-6 p.m. (w/ possible evening session)
    First-Year Studio
    Foundational Intervention
  • Tues., Nov. 24, 9-6 p.m. (w/ possible evening session)
    Third-Year Studio | Coordinator: Justin Taylor
    Urban Chicago Medium Density Housing
    The third-year studio’s final project is the design of a mixed-use, multi-family housing project on a site in Chicago, Ill. The project teaches students what’s involved in building housing in a metropolitan city.
  • Mon., Nov. 30, 8-6 p.m. (w/ possible evening session)
    Second-Year Studio | Coordinator: Hans Herrmann
    Collaborative Studio ‘Build/Design’
    The second-year Collaborative Tectonics Studio presents BUILD/DESIGN a full-scale study of wood frame materials and methods in service of heightened design education.  This fall, 62 architecture and building construction science students participated in a detailed project planning, cost estimating, scheduling and construction exercise. The 11-week effort resulted in the construction of two unique structures on the MSU campus. The structures form part of a home garden demonstration site located adjacent to the Landscape Architecture buildings just off Bully Blvd. on the MSU main campus. Realized by students as a kit-of-parts which feature hand built Shou Sugi Ban cypress partitions and a gull wing kinetic folding wall system the project focused students foundational materials and methods issues.

    The detailing and assembly logic learned in the BUILD portion of the semester will be presented by students in their DESIGN term-project, a Tea House. Students will present original Tea House designs based upon the recast kit of parts they previously deployed for the MSU Landscape Architecture BUILD project. Detailed assembly diagrams, materials estimates, and design models/renderings will be presented as evidence of the students newly forged knowledge of architectural tectonics.

  • Tues., Dec. 1, 9-6 p.m. (w/ possible evening session)
    Fourth-Studio (two studios)
    Studio One: Timber Hi-Rise in NYC | Coordinator: Jacob Gines
    “Scaffolding + Skin”
    BACKGROUND – This studio will examine the role of heavy timber tectonics in contemporary architecture – primarily focusing on structure as scaffolding and façade as skin. Students will engage this topic from a historic perspective and research the significance and varied application of these tectonic manifestations through an introduction to some tectonic theory and precedent. The scholarly study of the tekton (carpenter or builder) and the discourse surrounding the notion of tectonics received much attention throughout the late 1800’s and continues to exist as a critical endeavor today. It can be argued that at the heart of tectonic inquiry is the idea and application of poesis, ‘to make’. This constructed attitude will motivate the students to express their research and design attitude through a series of iterative exercises which will be visualized using palimpsestic drawing and additive modeling.

    Final proposals will be of a speculative building sited in Manhattan, NY at 104 West 57th Street.

    SUSTAINABLE STRATEGY – Utilize heavy timber and/or engineered wood construction in innovative and experimental ways to develop a proposal for a tall wood building (15-20 stories) in Midtown Manhattan.

    Benefits of using wood in tall wood buildings include…

    • Renewable natural resource

    • Reduction of carbon emissions

    • Carbon sequestering / carbon sink

    • Expedited erection schedules – 20%±

    • Reduction of overall project costs – 4%±

    • Innovative applications

    ————————————————————————
    Studio Two: Boys & Girls Club Educational Garden | Coordinator: Alexis Gregory

    The School of Architecture, Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education, Horticulture Club, and Graphic Design have joined together with the Boys and Girls Club of Starkville to design and construct an Educational Garden. The hope in constructing the garden is to get the kids at the Boys and Girls Club excited about growing and cooking with homegrown foods. This project intends to educate children on how to grow multiple different foods appropriate for the Starkville climate. The phases in the project intend to lay out a full plan for the construction of the gardens as well as intentions for future building changes. The building changes set up an educational kitchen to teach the kids how to prepare the food they grow. This educational garden will be an example of a community garden that will hopefully grow through the city of Starkville.

Architecture students attend MSU Women in Leadership luncheon

October 22nd, 2015 Comments Off on Architecture students attend MSU Women in Leadership luncheon

(l to r) Anna Barr, MSU Director of Student Housing Ann Bailey, and Alexis Gregory (photo by Laura Daniels)

IMG_3952

Anna Barr, left, and Emily Turner, right (Photo by Alexis Gregory)

(Story via Alexis Gregory)

Fourth-year architecture student Anna Barr and second-year architecture student Emily Turner were nominated by Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory to attend the MSU Women in Leadership luncheon on Wed., Oct. 21.

Speakers included the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Julia Hodges, and other female leaders from across campus.

The speakers discussed various issues such as work/life balance and gave advice on how to be a woman in a leadership position.

Turner is currently serving as president of the Mississippi State chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS), and Barr is the past president.

Assemblages class tours campus construction

October 22nd, 2015 Comments Off on Assemblages class tours campus construction

(Story and photos via Alexis Gregory)

Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory’s Assemblages class recently toured the new classroom building under construction on campus.

Conducting the tour were architects from Belinda Stewart Architects, Stephanie Stewart and Holly Hawkins. Also helping with the tour was Derek Perry, project manager with the general contractor for the project, Johnson Construction.

The tour covered the concrete structure of the parking area, the steel structure of the classroom levels and the wall section mockup showing the brick details of the cladding and how it relates to the historic architecture on campus.

School of Architecture professor works with Auburn’s Rural Studio

October 19th, 2015 Comments Off on School of Architecture professor works with Auburn’s Rural Studio

RS Workshop_1 RS Workshop_2

MSU School of Architecture Assistant Professor Emily McGlohn recently developed and hosted a workshop at Auburn University’s Rural Studio.

The design/build outreach program in West Alabama has developed inexpensive housing that can be designed and built for $20,000. In the last 10 years, the program has built 17 “20K” houses.

The Rural Studio group has committed to design and build three additional houses this year, and they want their design decisions to be evidence-based.

So, they called in McGlohn and two other experts – one from environmental consulting firm Atelier Ten and also a Ph.D. candidate from Yale University – to conduct a workshop to get students to think about what a new Ecological 20K house should look like.

Students were encouraged to focus on the environment, think about overall energy efficiency, good building enclosures, and a strategy for a house that is sensitive to material use and energy consumption.

McGlohn then helped the students develop tests to perform on the existing 17 houses to verify some of their assumptions and enable them to make evidence-based decisions for the new designs.

She also made recommendations on the building diagnostic tools the students would need to carry out the tests such as a blower door tester; infrared camera; and data loggers that measure light, humidity and temperature.

“It’s great for two SEC universities with architecture programs that have really close campuses to be able to collaborate on this project,” said McGlohn, who has been invited back to the Rural Studio throughout the semester to follow-up on the progress.

School of Architecture classes of 2004, 2005 hold reunion, give back

October 16th, 2015 Comments Off on School of Architecture classes of 2004, 2005 hold reunion, give back

0405 Reunion Sunglasses
The MSU School of Architecture classes of 2004 and 2005 recently held a reunion in Starkville.

Approximately 30 alumni and their guests attended the events, which included a tour of Giles Hall and lunch at the School of Architecture Amphitheater catered by Little Dooey’s.

F.L. Crane Professor and Director of the School of Architecture Michael Berk gave an update on the progress and changes in the school over the past ten years. Current student leaders also joined the group.

“I think I speak for everyone when I say that I was very impressed by the current students that we met,” said Jenna Lingsch, event co-coordinator.

The Class of 2004/2005 is presenting the school with a gift of $1,000, which includes individual gifts and ticket sales from the reunion event. The funds will be used to support the grassroots, student-led effort to raise funds for new seating in studio and critique spaces in Giles Hall.

“It is always amazing to see the successes and accomplishments of former students and alums,” said Berk. “The fact they chose to ‘reunite’ here at the MSU School of Architecture in Giles Hall speaks volumes to their continued passion and connection with our program. Furthermore,” he added, “their interest and willingness to make a financial commitment to the students to enhance our studio environment is incredibly humbling.”

Anyone who would like to add to the “Class of 2004/2005 Donation Seed” can send a check directly to:
School of Architecture
Mississippi State University
Attention: Michael Berk
P.O. Box AQ
Mississippi State, MS 39762

Please make checks payable to: MSU School of Architecture Advancement fund, memo: Giles Studio Seating.

For more information about how to give to the School of Architecture, contact P.K. Thomas, director of development, at (662) 325-2542 or
pthomas@foundation.msstate.edu.

You are currently viewing the archives for October, 2015 in the School Of Architecture News.