CAAD research center director has book chapter republished

April 13th, 2015 Comments Off

Associate Professor John Poros, director of the Carl Small Town Center (CSTC), recently had a chapter re-published in the two-volume book, Architecture and Mathematics from Antiquity to the Future.

Vol. 1: Antiquity to the 1500s

Vol. 2: The 1950s and the Future

Poros’ chapter, “The Ruled Geometries of Marcel Breuer,”provides an important contribution to this research archive that highlights the diverse relationships between the disciplines of mathematics and architecture through the century.

Grants help ‘Audit Squad’ get started

April 10th, 2015 Comments Off

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of a 20K House at Auburn University's Rural Studio. They also demonstrated how to use the equipment.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of a 20K House at Auburn University’s Rural Studio. They also demonstrated how to use the equipment.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Emily McGlohn has been experimenting with ways to introduce one of her research interests, the relationship between energy efficiency and the quality of construction, into the MSU’s School of Architecture curriculum while helping out the state at the same time.

“Building performance is easily tested with building diagnostic tools such as a blower door and thermal imaging camera,” said McGlohn.

So, the assistant professor used funds from her 2014 Schillig Grant, which she received for teaching excellence, to purchase the necessary testing equipment, and she secured a $500 Center for the Advancement of Service Learning Excellence (CASLE) mini grant to support travel.

McGlohn started an independent study course and recruited students interested in the topic. “The Audit Squad,” as she has dubbed the group, has been working this year to collect and analyze data.

In the fall, the Audit Squad – which includes Ria Bennet, third-year architecture major; Cody Smith, fourth-year architecture major; and Bill Plot, fourth-year building construction science major – traveled to Greenwood to test air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood.

“The best way to understand how a building performs is to actually test it with tools,” said McGlohn, who explained that the lower the air infiltration rate, the better the envelope. “A high air infiltration rate signifies a leaky building.”

The group also paid a visit to the Auburn University’s Rural Studio to perform tests on some of their projects. While at the Rural Studio, McGlohn presented a lecture on air infiltration, and her Audit Squad shared what they had learned.

“The students loved it,” she said. “It was a lot of fun.”

After analyzing their results, the squad began working on their own independent research project, which they have submitted to the upcoming MSU Undergraduate Research Symposium. They used the newly purchased tools to test the air infiltration rates of a variety of student rental properties built in Starkville over the last 40 years to see if age has anything to do with the rates.

This summer, the research will continue in Greenwood.

Teaming up with the College of Architecture, Art and Design’s Enterprise Rose Fellow, Emily Roush Elliott, the Audit Squad will test the air infiltration rates of a variety of low-income housing in the Greenwood area to compare the typical rental property with more modern low-incoming housing.

The data will be analyzed next fall to try to quantify the monetary and health burdens that can come from leaky, low-income housing. The findings and suggestions for improvement will be shared in a brochure for distribution to nonprofit organizations that could benefit from the data.

“The overall main goal,” said McGlohn, “is to create a baseline metric of energy efficiency rates for low-income housing in the Mississippi Delta.”

MSU architecture professor to serve as site coordinator for 2015 Society for Building Science Educators’ retreat

April 7th, 2015 Comments Off

McGlohn

McGlohn

Emily McGlohn’s proposal to serve as site coordinator for the 2015 Society for Building Science Educators’ retreat was recently accepted.

McGlohn, assistant professor at the Mississippi State University School of Architecture, will partner with committee chair Professor Alison Kwok, Ph.D. from the University of Oregon, to coordinate this summer’s Society for Building Science Educators’ retreat.

The retreat, with a “Regions and Localities” theme, will be held June 16-19 in Highlands, N.C.

Building science educators gather for the conference each summer to discuss teaching methods and have conversations about class projects.

Herman

Herman

At the conference, McGlohn will also present on “The Audit Squad,” her year-long independent study course where students are analyzing building performance and the relationship to energy efficiency and quality of construction.

Erik Herman, visiting assistant professor, will also represent MSU as a program committee member.

CAAD research center director to present at Pecha Kucha Biloxi

March 30th, 2015 Comments Off

perkes

David Perkes, AIA, will present as part of the first spring Pecha Kucha Biloxi event.

This year’s theme is based on MAPPartner, the Ohr Museum’s ongoing Katrina+10 series of exhibits and events. 

On April 2, from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Ohr O’Keefe Museum of Art, coast architects will discuss how Katrina impacted the local architecture and showcase their successful efforts to restore it.

“How Katrina Changed Our Look” presenters include:

·         Holly Gibbs – Hands on Mississippi
·         Kevin O’Brien – Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
·         Sonja Gillis – Lyn Meadows Discovery Center
·         Steve Phillips – WLOX
·         John Anderson, AIA – unabridged Architecture
·         Corey Christy – Walter Anderson Museum
·         Dr. Janice Johnson – Biloxi Public Schools
·         Allison Anderson, FAIA – unabridged Architecture
·         Windy Swetman – Swetman Security
·         Christene Brice – Harrison County Election Commission District 4
·         David Perkes, AIA – Gulf Coast Community Design Studio
·         Romy Simpson – Negrotto’s Gallery

For more information about the presenters, check out Pecha Kucha Biloxis’ Facebook page.

Also, MAPPartner Marvin Windows and Doors is excited to announce the return of the prestigious Marvin Architects Challenge celebrating acclaimed design and breathtaking architecture. This challenge gives architects the chance to submit their best work that displays architectural creativity and features Marvin Windows and Doors and see how they measure up against their peers.  It’s a yearly chance to show off their most award-worthy project and get the attention they deserve. This year, there are new judging categories as well as an extended award structure, which gives even more opportunities for recognition.

For more information on the program, please visit Marvin Architects Challenge 2015.

PechaKucha Night was devised in Tokyo in February 2003 as an event for young designers to meet, network and show their work in public. It has turned into a massive celebration, with events happening in hundreds of cities around the world.

Student-designed, built shelters now open at MSU Golf Course

March 27th, 2015 Comments Off

Golf_Course-shelters-ribboncut_20150323_M4B4124_1

Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State

Golf_Course-shelters-ribboncut_20150323_M4B4179

Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State

By Leah Barbour | Mississippi State University

Local golf enthusiasts joined Mississippi State University administrators, faculty, staff and students this week for the unveiling of two on-course shelters at the MSU Golf Course.

The new structures at the fourth and 10th holes, complete with men’s and women’s accommodations and cart parking spaces on each side, were designed by second-year architecture majors and built by second-year building construction science students.

Both the School of Architecture and the building construction science academic program are part of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design.

The work was completed during the fall semester collaborative studio, coordinated by associate professor Hans Herrmann and assistant professor Emily McGlohn of the architecture school, along with assistant professor Tom Leathem and lecturer Lee Carson of building construction science.

“Thank you for your active involvement, for the collective leadership from all our faculty and for everyone involved in this,” said MSU President Mark E. Keenum at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. “This is an opportunity to really showcase what Mississippi State talent is about. What a great new addition this is, not only to this golf course, but to our professional golf management program.”

The PGM program, housed in the College of Business, is the second oldest sanctioned by the Professional Golfers’ Association of America. Students completing the four-and-a-half-year curriculum receive a bachelor’s degree in marketing and 16 months of practical work experience.

Michael Berk, architecture school director, said MSU is the only institution of higher learning in the country to require all second-year architecture and building construction science students to complete a full year of collaborative studio.

“There’s no other school in the nation to require two full semesters of working together,” agreed Jim West, dean of the College of Architecture, Art and Design. “Our students have the opportunity to do truly collaborative work, and we’re always interested in having these types of projects for the community and our students and faculty.”

Though building construction science and architecture students have completed their portion of the project, MSU Department of Landscape Architecture students will continue by improving the landscaping around the buildings, said Craig Capano, director of the building construction science program.

“This is only the first of many projects that I hope we can all do together,” he said. “We’ve already started discussions about next fall, and the faculty have some great ideas. And that’s what Mississippi State is all about–it’s about learning; it’s about changing; it’s about improving.”

Sharon Oswald, College of Business dean, emphasized the on-course shelters also benefit PGM students.

“I want to thank the faculty, and particularly the students, on behalf of the PGM program and the MSU Golf Course,” Oswald said. “We love collaborative projects, and anything we can ever do to help, we will.”

The 6,390-yard, par-72 course, located three miles east of campus at 1520 Old Highway 82, opened to the public in 1986. Along with the two on-course shelters, cart path and driving range, the course features a 5,000-square-foot clubhouse with men’s and women’s locker rooms, a snack bar, and a fully stocked golf shop and classroom.

MSU honored for architectural, design collaborations

March 20th, 2015 Comments Off

Mississippi State University faculty won the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture's Collaborative Practice Award for leadership in the design and construction of the Green Building Demonstration Pavilion, left, at Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville. (Photo by Megan Bean.) MSU faculty received the ACSA Design Build Honorable Mention for development of public transit shelters, including the one shown at right, for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians in Philadelphia. (Photo submitted.)

Mississippi State University faculty won the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture’s Collaborative Practice Award for leadership in the design and construction of the Green Building Demonstration Pavilion, left, at Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville. (Photo by Megan Bean.) MSU faculty received the ACSA Design Build Honorable Mention for development of public transit shelters, including the one shown at right, for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians in Philadelphia. (Photo submitted.)

By Leah Barbour | Mississippi State University

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture recently honored two Mississippi State faculty teams with education awards.

The Washington, D.C.,-based association annually recognizes university architecture faculty who complete exceptional projects in building design and community collaborations, among other categories.

MSU’s team from the College of Architecture, Art and Design and the MSU Extension Service received the 2014-15 ACSA Collaborative Practice Award for the Green Building Demonstration Pavilion at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville.

Recognized faculty include Cory Gallo, assistant professor of landscape architecture; Hans C. Herrmann, associate professor of architecture; Suzanne Powney, assistant professor of art; Justin Taylor, assistant clinical professor of architecture; Brian Templeton, extension associate in landscape architecture; and Wayne Wilkerson, associate extension professor.

The Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum, the regional demonstration site for green infrastructure and sustainable building technologies, took four years and more than 100 MSU students to complete. The Starkville museum was cited in the award for following best practices in school-based community outreach programs.

In 2013, the museum project also received major national recognition with the American Society of Landscape Architecture’s Award of Excellence in Student Collaboration, the highest honor bestowed by the ASLA.

Additionally, the 2014-15 ACSA Design Build Honorable Mention went to MSU faculty members who oversaw the project to build public transit shelters a student team developed for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians in Philadelphia.

In addition to Herrmann, the group of honored faculty are Alexis Gregory and Emily M. McGlohn, both assistant professors of architecture, and assistant professor Tom Leathem and lecturer Lee Carson, faculty in the college’s building construction science program.

“Award winners inspire and challenge students, contribute to the profession’s knowledge base and extend their work beyond the borders of academy into practice and the public sector,” according to the ACSA’s website, www.acsa-arch.org, where the winning applications are available.

School of Architecture assistant professor featured on WTVA

March 16th, 2015 Comments Off

Tishomingo history timeline complete

(WTVA)

Tishomingo Mayor James Tennyson has waited for this day to arrive.

“Things have progressed slow, but we can see the end result,” said Tennyson.

A timeline in the form of panels pieces together the life and experiences of generations of people including one of the earliest inhabitants, Chief Tishomingo.

It is located in the Tishomingo community center.

Tishomingo native Justin Taylor, assistant professor in the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University, has worked tirelessly to bring the exhibit to life.

“Putting together this timeline, you find out lots of things we didn’t know, lots of pictures we didn’t know we had or could get a hold of,” said Taylor.

As word spread of the developing timeline, locals came forward with contributions that amazed all involved, including Mayor Tennyson.

“There’s just a lot of information here on history that people does not know, and it took a lot of digging up; but we found it,” added Tennyson.

Pictures would tell the story of a town that would begin as a settlement along the original Natchez Trace and would later be incorporated in 1908.

“Tishomingo has a very interesting, fascinating history and most folks don’t know about it – especially the younger folks,” said Alderman Anne Taylor.

Justin Taylor is one of those young people, but one very much interested in town history and preserving it in a building he designed.

The building’s exterior elements celebrate what once stood near the new building – a cotton gin. The gin yard was a gathering place as this new community center has become.

“It’s all about telling a story. It’s about giving something back for me. It’s about giving back to the place I grew up,” added Taylor.

The late Alderman Jim Burns also wanted that story told.

He donated money for the land and building to help preserve the history of Tishomingo.

Other personal donations also helped to make the facility a reality.

Mississippi Development Authority grants along with a $25,000 contribution from the city helped to fund the project.

Carl Small Town Center featured in Tupelo’s Daily Journal

January 30th, 2015 Comments Off

Corinth tourism wants downtown boutique hotel

By Lena Mitchell

Daily Journal Corinth Bureau

CORINTH – Corinth tourism officials want to spark interest in building a boutique hotel downtown, and the Mississippi State University Carl Small Town Center is doing the groundwork.

Corinth Area Convention and Visitors Bureau Executive Director Christy Burns and tourism council president Russell Smith met this week with MSU School of Architecture student Hannah Waycaster and Carl Small Town Center Director John Poros to review the feasibility study for the project.

“It’s been a problem for us for a long time that Corinth doesn’t have enough hotel rooms,” Smith said.

At times like the mid-March weekend when Corinth hosts a popular Bible conference at a local church and a state gymnastics meet at the Crossroads Arena, Corinth hotels are fully booked and some people who plan to attend must stay in hotels in nearby cities, he said.

The proposal Waycaster and Poros presented was developed with the help of a professor in the university’s real estate department.

It outlines a 49-room hotel to be built on one of several available properties in downtown Corinth that the team scouted. Those properties range in size from a few thousand square feet, requiring the hotel to be built vertically with several stories, to as large as more than 35,000 square feet.

“I stayed at the Alluvian Hotel in Greenwood for the Mississippi-Alabama Rural Tourism Conference, and I think something like that could work in Corinth,” Burns said.

The Alluvian is described as “a cosmopolitan boutique hotel in the heart of the Mississippi Delta,” and is situated across the street from the Viking Cooking School, which attracts visitors worldwide.

“Our hotels seem to be booked Mondays through Wednesdays,” Burns said, “but we’re trying to help sell weekends. For group tours a boutique hotel might be a target for that, or something like a girls’ weekend.”

Waycaster, under Poros’ direction, has developed several community improvement projects in Corinth, including a recently completed pocket park at the corner of Wick and Franklin streets, and a proposal for renovations at Crossroads Regional Park. A $40,000 grant from the Pierce Foundation – $10,000 a year for four years – is being used to support these projects.

Waycaster’s next step is to create a schematic design for the hotel, using a 20,000-square-foot lot to create the footprint for the design. She expects to have a design to present by early summer.

“This work will show prospective builders the feasibility of the project, but they would need to use their own people to decide on going forward with it,” Poros said.

lena.mitchell@journalinc.com

Gregory to present at CASLE Mini-Grants Workshop

January 20th, 2015 Comments Off

Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory, AIA, will present at the CASLE Mini-Grants Workshop on Thurs., Feb. 5, from 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. in 1405 Presentation Room at the Mitchell Memorial Library.

The workshop will provide an overview of the service-learning mini-grant program offered by the Center for the Advancement of Service-Learning Excellence (CASLE) including the mini-grant application process and examples of funded service-learning projects.

Gregory received a service-learning grant in the past and will share about her project.

Service-Learning Advisory Committee members will also discuss the best ways to write proposals that will be funded.

For more information, visit servicelearning.msstate.edu

Architecture, building construction science students establish a national model for academic collaboration

November 18th, 2014 Comments Off

Mississippi State University President Mark Keenum, Provost and Executive Vice President Jerry Gilbert and Interim Vice President for Student Affairs Bill Broyles visit the Collaborative Studio in Giles Hall to view models and full-scale mock-ups of the golf course facilities being designed and built by architecture and building construction science students. Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University President Mark Keenum, Provost and Executive Vice President Jerry Gilbert and Interim Vice President for Student Affairs Bill Broyles visit the Collaborative Studio in Giles Hall to view models and full-scale mock-ups of the golf course facilities being designed and built by architecture and building construction science students. Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art and Design is paving the way nationally when it comes to collaboration between the fields of construction and architecture.

In the fall, CAAD’s second-year architecture and building construction science studios come together to form a joint Collaborative Studio, where students are challenged to bring knowledge from their two disciplines together.

Assistant Professor of architecture Emily McGlohn, coordinator for the studio, explained that buildings are becoming more and more complex and require construction and architecture professionals to work together – what is referred to in the industry as Integrated Project Delivery (IPD).

“The students are learning the earlier the constructors and architects come together in the design process, the better the building will be and the less headaches they will encounter along the way.”

Each year, students in this studio are challenged to work together to design and construct a full-scale product from start to finish for a real client. Last year’s fall Collaborative Studio constructed two bus shelters for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. This year, students are working on two lighting shelters for the MSU Golf Course.

“Every class gets a chance to do a project like this,” said Associate Professor of architecture Hans Herrmann. “That’s rare,” he said, going on to explain how important hands-on learning is for students. “The reality of making is different from drawing. Gravity becomes a reality for them,” he laughed.

And the students have, in fact, dealt with their fair share of challenges, both with learning how to work together and actually building something they have designed.

“This is a pretty intense, hands-on learning experience for them,” said building construction science instructor Lee Carson, who said that students are learning “the idea of drawing with materials.”

This year’s project includes two separate shelters with restrooms for the golf course – one with cypress wall panels as an exterior skin and the other with a concrete skin. Both facilities will have cisterns to capture rainwater that will be used to flush the toilets.

After working on individual, small-scale designs, the 49 students split into four teams to tackle designing and building the two facilities in pieces – a wood wall panel team, a concrete wall panel team, a roof truss team and a concrete wall cistern team. This teamwork has allowed for a peer-review atmosphere, which has resulted in improved quality of design and construction.

“The students’ work has continued to impress us,” said Bill Broyles, interim vice for student affairs, who has been consulting with the group from the start.

Construction began on site with the pouring of the foundation in late September. Students are currently working on the formwork for the cistern wall while the other teams are fabricating their components off site. Construction on both buildings is set to be finished by the end of the month.

The project will wrap up with a final review on Dec. 1, where students will explain the design and construction process. A ribbon cutting ceremony and reception – open to the MSU community – will be held on the golf course in the spring.

“The students are really excited to have an investment on campus,” said Herrmann. “And we are grateful to have a project to work on,” added Michael Berk, F.L. Crane Professor and director of the School of Architecture.

According to Jim West, the college’s dean, CAAD is the only college in the country where the entire group of construction and architecture students from one year-level come together in a joint studio.

“MSU is truly reframing innovative architecture and construction education,” said the new director of the Building Construction Science Program Craig Capano, Ph.D., and Roy Anderson Professor.

“For our students, the idea of IPD and project collaboration is going to be a familiar concept,” added Berk.

“And we are setting a standard we feel will be modeled in the years to come across the country,” finished West.

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