Academic exploration: MSU undergraduate research featured at interdisciplinary symposium

April 26th, 2018 Comments Off on Academic exploration: MSU undergraduate research featured at interdisciplinary symposium

(left to right) Back Row: Baron Necaise, Felipe Olvera, Duncan Thomas, Blake Farrar, Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory, Will Jordan, Emily Turner, Bailey McDaniel; Front Row: Olivia Baker, Madison Holbrook, McKenzie Johnson (photos by Alexis Gregory)

 

Hosted by the university’s Judy and Bobby Shackouls Honors College, the annual Mississippi State University Spring Undergraduate Research Symposium received 165 submissions from students conducting faculty-guided research. Projects were assigned to one of four categories—arts and humanities, biological sciences and engineering, physical sciences and engineering, and social sciences. Certain categories had multiple award winners due to the large number of submissions.In recognition of the university’s Carnegie Community Engagement Classification, a community engagement track also was included.

A team of 46 campus faculty and graduate students representing a cross-section of academic areas served as competition judges. Featured speaker for the symposium was John Bickle, professor and head of MSU’s Department of Philosophy and Religion.

David Shaw, vice president for research and economic development, said undergraduate students are an integral part of the multi-faceted research underway at MSU.

“Pursuing research opportunities is a critical part of academic life on our campus, and our students are recognized for their commitment to discovery, creation and exploration in our labs, studios, library, research farms and beyond,” Shaw said. “We are pleased that members of our faculty are committed to providing undergraduates with meaningful roles in the overall research enterprise and promoting interdisciplinary research as an important component of scholarly activity.”

Taking first place in the oral presentation, arts and humanities category was Emily E. Turner of Starkville, a senior architecture major mentored by Alexis Gregory, associate professor of architecture.

Also selected for inclusion:

  • William Jordan’s project, “Working in Hand,” was co-authored by Baron Necaise, Olivia Baker, and Felipe Olivera and was completed under the guidance of Associate Professor Alexis Gregory.
  • Duncan Thomas’s poster, “Post-Occupancy Analysis – Learning From the Existing and Fixing for the Future,” was co-authored by McKenzie Johnson, Madison Holbrook, and Blake Farrar and was completed under the guidance of Associate Professor Alexis Gregory.

For more on MSU’s Judy and Bobby Shackouls Honors College, visit www.honors.msstate.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @ShackoulsHonors.

 

Mississippi Business Journal article features MSU School of Architecture director

March 28th, 2018 Comments Off on Mississippi Business Journal article features MSU School of Architecture director

By | Becky Gillette | Mississippi Business Journal

“Green design” in architecture is far more than a buzz word or a fad. It is increasingly just the way things are done to not only preserve the environment, but the value of the owner’s investments.

BERK

Green architecture as a phrase may be a fad, said Michael Berk, AIA, director of the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University. The word he prefers is ecological design, that is designing in concert and in balance with the natural systems around us, working with these systems instead of against them.

The U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) guidelines are now used by many federal projects, as well as state and local governmental projects and private developments.

“The purpose of the guidelines is to minimize energy use, maximize resources, minimize land use and create healthier, sustainable construction and living environments,” Berk said. “In and of itself, it is not going to solve the world’s problems. But it is a good minimum standard like the building code is a good minimum standard. LEED guidelines are now fundamentally a standardized practice for building design, construction and commissioning. Homes are probably the largest investment most people will ever make, and green building techniques maximize the return on investment because buildings are designed to last and perform efficiently and economically.”

In the future, major changes will be coming in how buildings are powered. Berk said at present, electricity comes from large, centralized power plants many miles away, and approximately 40 to 60 percent of the energy is lost through friction and heat dissipation in the grid before it gets to the end user.

“That is not a good economic model,” Berk said. “We now have the solar technology that makes it possible for every building to take care of its own energy needs. The future could be based on a ‘distributed power model’ for localized energy generation. A comparison is the Internet and stand-alone computers versus the mainframe computer and dumb terminals. Currently we have buildings that rely on central power plants. We could use the energy grid in the same way that the Internet operates and allow each building on the grid to make its own energy and send excess energy to other places when there is excess and purchase additional energy from the grid when it is needed. Photo-voltaic collection makes economic sense right now.”

Berk said internationally the clean energy sector is growing at a phenomenal rate in terms of jobs and economic development.

“Japan, Germany, China and South Korea have figured it out, and they are leaving us in the dust,” he said. “The U.S. led the world in solar and wind technology 15 years ago and it now appears that many nations are leapfrogging ahead of us.”

Green architecture applies not just to new but existing buildings, said Allison H. Anderson, FAIA, LEED-AP, unabridged Architecture PLLC, Bay St. Louis, who in 2002 became the first architect in Mississippi to be LEED accredited.

“One principal is the greenest building is an already existing building, if you can keep it in a functional condition,” she said. “If you have a building that can be renovated, that is the best situation. You have already fired the bricks and cut down the trees. Those are resources that have already been extracted or harvested.”

For existing buildings, Anderson recommends better insulation, upgrading windows and doors to reflect the heat rather than absorbing it and “cool roofs.”

“Roofs are really important in this climate,” she said. “If you are going to replace your roof, you should look at cool roofs which are very bright white that reflects the heat instead of absorbing it.”

She recommends covered spaces outdoors to reduce the urban heat island effect. An example is trees shading permeable parking lots. For a really green building, install low-flow toilets, sinks and showers, and upgrade mechanical equipment. Replace lights with LEDs bulbs, and install motion occupancy sensors so lights turn off automatically when people are not in the room.

Even before Hurricane Katrina, Anderson stressed to clients that sustainability is really important. After Katrina, they realized it wasn’t just sustainability that was important, but resilience. That involves making buildings safe for occupancy before and after a storm event like a hurricane on the Coast or a tornado in the Delta. She said buildings need to be prepared for climate change that is resulting in more severe weather events.

Anderson said resilience is about the entire design of communities, not just individual buildings. After Hurricane Sandy, the 2012 Atlantic hurricane that caused an estimated $69 billion in damages, Anderson’s firm won a competition sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) called Rebuild by Design. Ten international teams were chosen to come up with ideas to make the Northeast more resilient because they weren’t prepared for Hurricane Sandy.

“Surprisingly, some of their buildings are only three feet above sea level, which is kind of shocking to us on the Gulf Coast,” Anderson said. “This project took about a year. I led a team from the Gulf Coast including the MSU Gulf Coast Community Design Studio and another firm from New Orleans. We designed city scale improvements in Bridgeport, Conn., and were successfully in getting Bridgeport $75 million in awards from HUD to improve their resilience.”

Anderson said it became apparent after Hurricane Katrina that communities must be prepared for bigger storms, higher temperatures and greater sea level change—more severe climate challenges all the way around. She did a lot of research and ended up writing an entry in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia about adapting to climate sensitive hazards through architecture.

“We talk a lot about adaption because we are going to have to adapt our buildings and behaviors to climate change,” she said. “Right now, here on the Coast, we have about 82 days a year that are more than 90 degrees. By the 2020, we will have about 100 days more than 90 degrees, and by 2080, 120 to 155 days that are more than 90 degrees. We need to prepare for that. Think how our air conditioners strain in the peak months. Think how our electrical grid is strained over peak summer afternoons.”

Anderson said it is also important to be prepared for more severe rainstorms by having less impermeable surfaces and more places for the water to go where it doesn’t cause flooding. Options include permeable paving options for parking areas and detection swales or ponds.

A good example is the Depot pond in Bay St. Louis. It stores storm water while creating a scenic spot for visitors.

“Green infrastructure can be a really beneficial attraction for cities,” Anderson said. “It doesn’t have to just be a ditch. And this isn’t just a coastal issue. There are just as many problems in Jackson or any other city that has a lot of concrete.”

CAAD holds design charrette for new facilities

February 8th, 2018 Comments Off on CAAD holds design charrette for new facilities

The Mississippi State University College of Architecture, Art and Design recently brought together its six advisory boards (four industry advisory boards, a faculty advisory board and a student advisory board) for a full-day design charrette to discuss needs and wants for new facilities for the college.

The need to locate all of the college’s units together, as well as space constraints and the need for repairs/updates in several buildings, has put the college on the university’s list for new facilities in the near future.

Cindy Simpson, a 1996 Mississippi State University interior design graduate, first discussed with Dean Jim West the concept of holding a design charrette to gather ideas, and her concept came to fruition on Fri., Jan. 26.

Attendees were divided into teams – each containing a mix of faculty, students, alumni and friends in the four various fields – and were encouraged to discuss needs and wants for the future CAAD facilities.

They were given a tour of existing facilities in Howell Building and Giles Hall as well as basic program and site information to assist in their think tank session.

After hours of discussion, each team presented their ideas (ranging from the philosophical to concrete )to the group, which included invited guests Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs Allison Pearson; MSU Director of Planning, Design and Construction Administration Tim Muzzi; and Executive Director of Development for the MSU Foundation Jack McCarty.

Previously known as the School of Architecture, the college was established in 2004 with the addition of the Interior Design Program and the Department of Art. In 2007, the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning Board approved the formation of the undergraduate program in Building Construction Science, adding this fourth unit to the college.

The college is currently housed in numerous buildings across campus. The School of Architecture studios are located in Giles Hall along with the dean’s office and staff. The Department of Art buildings include Freeman Hall (houses the main office), Stafford Hall, Briscoe Hall and a portion of Howell Building; gallery spaces are located in the Cullis Wade Depot, the Visual Arts Center (808 University Drive) and the adjacent building.  The Interior Design Program studios are located in Etheredge Hall, and the Building Construction Science Program is housed in another portion of Howell Building.

Click here to view an overview of all of the teams’ work.

MSU Carl Small Town Center’s Gregory to lead statewide planning association

January 29th, 2018 Comments Off on MSU Carl Small Town Center’s Gregory to lead statewide planning association

By | Sasha Steinberg

STARKVILLE, Miss.—A Mississippi State alumnus and community planner for the university’s Carl Small Town Center is beginning a new leadership role with the state’s professional organization for city planners.

Thomas R. Gregory III recently was elected to a one-year term as president-elect of the Mississippi Chapter of the American Planning Association. In January 2019, he will begin a two-year term as the organization’s president.

“It is an honor to be selected by my peers and colleagues across Mississippi to lead our state chapter,” Gregory said. “The work we do as planners is critical to the success of Mississippi’s communities, and I will work hard to promote our profession across the state.”

Gregory said he looks forward to collaborating with the executive team to update the chapter’s strategic plan and increase membership among planning professionals in Mississippi.

“I would also like to piggy-back on our national organization’s ‘Great Places’ initiative by creating a ‘Great Places in Mississippi’ program to recognize Mississippi communities that exemplify good planning,” Gregory added.

Prior to being named president-elect, Gregory served as APA Mississippi’s public information officer and conference committee chair. He currently serves the APA on a national level as a member of its leadership development taskforce.

Gregory, a native of Greenwood, is a 2005 MSU magna cum laude business administration, construction management and land development bachelor’s graduate who also minored in economics and political science. He returned to his alma mater during the 2017 fall semester after serving eight years as chief administrative officer for the City of Greenwood. There, he served on the board of directors for Main Street Greenwood, Greenwood-Leflore County Chamber of Commerce, Greenwood Boys and Girls Club and ArtPlace Mississippi.

A Master of City and Regional Planning graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gregory is licensed by the American Institute of Certified Planners and is a member of Congress for the New Urbanism, among other professional groups. He is a graduate of the Sustainable Cities Design Academy, Public Interest Design Institute and Leadership Mississippi.

Part of the College of Architecture, Art and Design, the Carl Small Town Center is a statewide community design outreach program that was endowed in 2004 by MSU alumnus and major benefactor Fred E. Carl Jr. of Greenwood. For more on the college, visit www.caad.msstate.edu; its Carl Small Town Center, at http://carlsmalltowncenter.orgor www.msstate.edu/videos/2016/07/carl-small-town-center.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

See the story in the Maroon Memo.

See the story in the Mississippi Business Journal.

Mississippi State architecture educator releases latest book, ‘Jimi Hendrix and Philosophy’

December 21st, 2017 Comments Off on Mississippi State architecture educator releases latest book, ‘Jimi Hendrix and Philosophy’

Theodore “Ted” G. Ammon’s recent book, “Jimi Hendrix and Philosophy: Experience Required,” was released on December 12.

Ammon, an associate professor of philosophy at Millsaps College, also teaches the Philosophy of Architecture course at the Mississippi State University School of Architecture’s Jackson Center. He has also authored “Imagine U” and edited “Conversations with William H. Gass” and “David Bowie and Philosophy: Rebel, Rebel.

“Our fifth-year students at the School of Architecture Jackson Center in historic downtown Jackson are fortunate to have such an esteemed philosopher and author from Milsaps College teaching our Philosophy of Architecture course,” said Director and F.L. Crane Professor Michael Berk. 

Jassen Callender, associate professor and director of the Jackson Center, contributed to the chapter “Facing Up to the Realities.”

About the book – via amazon.com:
“In “Jimi Hendrix and Philosophy,” philosophers come to terms with the experience and the phenomenon of Jimi Hendrix, uncovering some surprising implications of Hendrix’s life and work. Much of this book is concerned with the restless polarities and dualities that reveal themselves through Hendrix….What did Hendrix mean when he spoke of “the realities” of conflict conveyed in “Machine Gun”? What is a “Voodoo Chile”? When does noise become music? These and other questions are addressed in “Jimi Hendrix and Philosophy”.”

Ammon was born in Vicksburg and is a 1976 Mississippi State alumnus. He received his Master of Architecture as well as his Doctor of Philosophy from Washington University. He began teaching at Millsaps College in 1985 and has taught for Mississippi State for over 10 years. In 1992, he received the “Distinguished Professor Award” from Millsaps. Ammon is proud to drive a 1956 Dodge Coronet with a V8 engine, dual exhausts and pushbutton transmission. He “still plays vinyl proudly” and believes “Jimi Hendrix rules electric guitar.”

Callender, a 1994 School of Architecture alumnus, is an associate professor of architecture and director of Mississippi State University’s Jackson Center, which houses the School of Architecture’s fifth-year program, where he teaches advanced design studios and Theory of Urban Design. He is also an occasional practitioner, painter and writer who is a member of both the Society of Architectural Historians and a regional board member of the U.S. Green Building Council. Callender’s educational background underscores this range of interests and concerns, from undergraduate training in both architecture and philosophy (1987-1994) to graduate work in painting, sculpture and art history leading to an MFA in 2001. His subsequent research interests at first seem varied in equal measure – ranging from phenomenological studies of desire, to analyses of the role of perception and meaning in sustainable urbanism, to questioning the impact of shifts from meaning to information paradigms on the evolution of architecture theory and practice. All of this research aims at deepening our understanding of how meaning is constructed and shared in and through the built environment. His first book, “Architecture History and Theory in Reverse,” was published by Routledge in July 2017.

See the news in the Maroon Memo.

School of Architecture hosts Advisory Board for fall 2017 meeting

October 12th, 2017 Comments Off on School of Architecture hosts Advisory Board for fall 2017 meeting

The Mississippi State University School of Architecture Advisory Board met on Mon., Oct. 10, in the Hunter Henry Center on campus in Starkville.

After the business meeting, the group was invited to an open house event at the Carl Small Town Center to meet with the new director Leah Kemp and see exhibits of current work.

A reception was held following the open house for the current exhibition on display in the Giles Gallery, “Bridges of Touchstone,” featuring work by alumnus and board member Bradley Touchstone’s firm.

(photos by Kelsey Brownlee)

Carl Small Town Center director discusses city planning in Mississippi on SuperTalk Radio

August 10th, 2017 Comments Off on Carl Small Town Center director discusses city planning in Mississippi on SuperTalk Radio

(photo by Megan Bean / © Mississippi State University)

Leah Kemp, director of the Carl Small Town Center at Mississippi State University, was a part of “Good things with Rebecca Turner” on Mississippi’s SuperTalk Radio yesterday [Aug. 9] at 2:20.

Kemp discussed city planning for towns and cities across the Magnolia State.
 
Also a part of the discussion was Scott Hummel, executive vice president and provost of William Carey University, discussing the rebuilding that has taken place on campus following a January tornado.

Listen to the recording here.

Established in 1979, the Carl Small Town Center seeks to initiate theoretical and applied research and to serve as a national focus for the collection, storage, dissemination and application of information pertinent to issues of special interest in small towns. Activities include graphic and photographic documentation and computer imaging of the small town scene. The CSTC has participated in design case studies, environmental impact studies, and economic and marketing analyses. It provides research and service assistance to towns through the redevelopment of downtowns and the implementation of other comparable community improvement initiatives. Assistance projects include community design and improvement, economic diversification, town planning, conservation of architectural and historic resources, affordable housing design and technology, and other activities that affect quality of life in the community.

The center’s motto is, “We are advocates of meaningful design for small towns… and towns that wish they were!”

Jackson Center director’s first book available for sale

August 8th, 2017 Comments Off on Jackson Center director’s first book available for sale

 

The publisher, Routledge, describes the book as follows: “Architecture History and Theory in Reverse looks at architecture history in reverse, in order to follow chains of precedents back through time to see how ideas alter the course of civilization in general and the discipline of architecture in particular. Part I begins with present-day attitudes about architecture and traces them back to seminal ideas from the beginning of the twentieth century. Part II examines how pre-twentieth-century societies designed and understood architecture, how they strove to create communal physical languages and how their disagreements set the stage for our information age practices. The book includes 45 black-and-white images and will be useful to students of architecture and literature.”

Callender, a 1994 School of Architecture alumnus, teaches advanced design studios at the Jackson Center, which houses the School of Architecture’s fith-year program. He is also an occasional practitioner, painter and writer who is a member of both the Society of Architectural Historians and a regional board member of the US Green Building Council. Callender’s educational background underscores this range of interests and concerns, from undergraduate training in both architecture and philosophy (1987-1994) to graduate work in painting, sculpture and art history leading to an MFA in 2001. His subsequent research interests at first seem varied in equal measure – ranging from phenomenological studies of desire, to analyses of the role of perception and meaning in sustainable urbanism, to questioning the impact of shifts from meaning to information paradigms on the evolution of architecture theory and practice.

“All of this research aims at deepening our understanding of how meaning is constructed and shared in and through the built environment,” said Callender.

Architecture History and Theory in Reverse is now available for purchase online and can be found at Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Books a Million, among others.

MSU architecture student honored by Building Technology Educators’ Society

July 5th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU architecture student honored by Building Technology Educators’ Society

Zachary Henry presenting at BTES 2017.

Henry at far right.

Henry is third from right.

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

A senior architecture major in Mississippi State’s College of Architecture, Art and Design recently received national recognition from the Building Technology Educators’ Society.

Zachary R. Henry of Knoxville, Tennessee, is one of only two students who were awarded scholarships by BTES during the nonprofit’s national conference in Des Moines, Iowa.

In addition to receiving a $500 travel scholarship, free conference admission and a complimentary BTES one-year membership, Henry presented his Best Undergraduate Paper award-winner “Ecological Functionalism in the Work of Glenn Murcutt: A Case Study of the Fredericks-White House” at the conference.

The BTES award jury concluded that Henry’s paper “gave a rare glimpse into a good topic of post-occupancy evaluation for a well-known architect.”

Research for the paper was conducted under the guidance of MSU Assistant Professor Emily McGlohn’s Audit Squad, an independent study course comprised of students exploring energy efficiency and the quality of construction.

Last summer, Henry traveled to Australia to conduct research and interview internationally renowned architect Glenn Murcutt. The opportunity was made possible by a $2,000 fellowship courtesy of MSU architecture alumnus Briar Jones and his wife Michelle. For more, visit https://www.msstate.edu/our-people/2016/10/zachary-r-henry.

A student in the university’s Judy and Bobby Shackouls Honors College, Henry plans to pursue a master’s degree in environmental design studies following graduation. He also expressed interest in moving to Nova Scotia and working for a highly respected firm that shares similar architectural values.

Founded in 1996, BTES is comprised of architectural educators who are passionate about teaching the technology of building design and construction. Its mission is to promote and publish the best pedagogic practices, relevant research, scholarship and other creative activity to facilitate student learning, advance innovation and enhance the status of disciplines in the profession at large. For more, visit http://btes.org.

The nationally accredited School of Architecture in MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design offers the only curriculum in the state leading to a professional degree in architecture. 

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

See the story in The Starkville Daily News.

See the story in the Mississippi Business Journal.

MSU Gulf Coast Community Design Studio-led project receives $100,000 Knight Cities Challenge grant

June 14th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU Gulf Coast Community Design Studio-led project receives $100,000 Knight Cities Challenge grant

Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio is receiving a $100,000 grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation for a project that seeks to increase community engagement on the city of Biloxi’s once segregated beaches, the city’s primary recreation space. (Submitted photo/courtesy of David Perkes)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio is receiving a $100,000 grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation for a project that seeks to increase community engagement at the city of Biloxi’s primary recreation space.

Titled “Witnessing the Beach,” the project is among 33 winners of the foundation’s Knight Cities Challenge, which is designed to help spur civic innovation at the city, neighborhood and block levels through ideas generated by innovators from around the country.

Specifically, the challenge encourages applicants—nonprofits, for-profits and individuals, to name a few—to share ideas for making the 26 communities where the Knight brothers once owned newspapers more vibrant places to live and work. The challenge is made possible by The Knight Foundation, which supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. For more, visit http://knightcities.org.

This year, 4,500 applications were evaluated on the strength of the proposed project idea, its potential to advance talent, opportunity or engagement, and the plan to execute the project. Of those, 144 finalists were selected and evaluated on five criteria: impact, innovation, inspiration, learning and capacity. The Knight Foundation board of trustees chose 33 winners, including MSU’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio.

David Perkes, MSU professor and founding director of the Gulf Coast Community Design Studio, officially accepted the award Monday evening [June 12] in Miami, Florida. He was accompanied by Bill Raymond, historical administrator for the City of Biloxi, one of the project’s co-sponsors. Other partners include the Biloxi Chapter of the NAACP.

Perkes said the primary objective of the proposed “Witnessing the Beach” project is to create a culture of engagement on Biloxi’s once segregated beaches.

“Biloxi’s beach is the city’s most used public space, but it is typically not programmed and the public access is taken for granted,” he said. “The organized 1960’s wade-in protests challenged the segregation of Biloxi’s beaches. Programming the beach in the same places the wade-in demonstrations were organized will create a highly visible place for community engagement.”

 “Cities are the product of their place and culture,” Perkes continued. “Biloxi’s beach and its African American population are primary components of the city’s history and present condition,” Perkes continued. “The Wade-in protesters are now seniors, and their witnesses of work to overcome racial discrimination in 1960 are especially needed today.”

Perkes said the proposed project calls for the construction of movable platforms that will be positioned on the beach at several Wade-in protest sites. The movable platforms would be created by a large, roll-out surface on which chairs can be set up and shade from the sun can be provided.

Additionally, the platform will be designed to support exhibit panels, which will help create a pop-up gallery on the beach. This changing exhibit space will give artists and other storytellers a unique and very public venue to showcase and discuss their work, thereby advancing Biloxi’s creative culture, Perkes said.

“Creating a movable event and exhibit place with a surface that is accessible to people with mobility limitations will expand the beach’s use and bring heroic Civil Rights stories to life. The space will connect people of different generations and races with today’s artists and youth, so they can share past stories and discuss today’s concerns,” Perkes said.

The Gulf Coast Community Design Studio is a professional service and outreach program of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design. It was established in Biloxi in response to Hurricane Katrina to provide architectural design services, landscape and planning assistance, and educational opportunities and research to organizations and communities along the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

Through close, pragmatic partnerships, GCCDS works with local organizations and communities in and beyond Mississippi’s three coastal counties, putting professional expertise to work in an effort to shape vibrant and resilient Gulf Coast Communities. Learn more at gccds.org or www.msstate.edu/videos/2015/08/we-ring-true-gulf-coast-community-design-studio.

For more information on the GCCDS’s Knight Cities Challenge project, contact Perkes at 228-436-4661 or dperkes@gccds.msstate.edu.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Read the story in The Sun Herald.

 
 

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