Architecture students honored at undergraduate research symposium

April 26th, 2016 Comments Off on Architecture students honored at undergraduate research symposium


(photos by Alexis Gregory)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Nearly two dozen students recently were recognized at Mississippi State for successful faculty-guided research efforts during the Undergraduate Research Symposium at the university’s Judy and Bobby Shackouls Honors College.

Projects submitted for the annual competition were assigned to one of four categories, including arts and humanities, biological sciences and engineering, physical sciences and engineering, and social sciences. In recognition of the university’s Carnegie Community Engagement Classification, a community engagement and service learning track also was included for the fourth year.

A team of 42 campus faculty members representing a cross-section of academic areas served as judges for the competition.

Residents of Mississippi, Cameroon, Canada, Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, Tennessee and Texas, this year’s winners include (by project type and category):

 

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

ARTS AND HUMANITIES:

FIRST—Emily E. Turner of Starkville, a junior architecture major advised by Alexis Gregory, assistant professor of architecture.

SECOND—Olivier Peloquin of Canada, a freshman history major advised by Anne Marshall, associate professor of history.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING, SESSION I:

FIRST—Ruth E. Fowler of Madison, a senior physics major advised by Todd Mlsna, associate professor of chemistry.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING, SESSION II:

FIRST—Malcolm E. Brooks of Pensacola, Florida, a senior food science, nutrition and health promotion major advised by Tae Jo Kim, assistant research professor in the food science, nutrition and health promotion department.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING, SESSION III:

FIRST—Kellie A. Mitchell of Chelsea, Alabama, a senior biochemistry/pre-medicine major advised by Yuhua Farnell, assistant professor in the biochemistry, molecular biology, entomology and plant pathology department.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING:

FIRST—Eric W. Stallcup of Huntsville, Alabama, a senior aerospace engineering/astronautics major advised by Keith Koenig, professor of aerospace engineering.

VISUAL DISPLAYS

ARTS AND HUMANITIES:

FIRST—Fleshia D. Gillon of Amory, a junior human sciences/fashion design and merchandising major advised by Charles Freeman, assistant professor of human sciences; Todd French, associate professor of chemical engineering; Jason Ward, assistant extension professor in the agricultural and biological engineering department; and Stephen Meyers, assistant extension professor at the North Mississippi Research and Extension Center.

SECOND—Michael G. Reinert of Raleigh, North Carolina, a senior human sciences/fashion design and merchandising major advised by Charles Freeman, assistant professor of human sciences.

THIRD—Lauren L. Peterson of Terrell, Texas, a sophomore biochemistry major advised by Lori Neuenfeldt, art instructor and coordinator of the art department’s gallery and outreach programs.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING:

FIRST—Jackson B. Coole of Picayune, a sophomore biological engineering major advised by James A. Stewart Jr., assistant professor of biological sciences.

SECOND—Daniel M. McClung of Brandon, a biological engineering major advised by Janet Donaldson, associate professor of biological sciences.

THIRD—Jaslyn B. Langford of Calhoun City, a senior biological sciences/pre-medicine and microbiology double-major advised by James A. Stewart Jr., assistant professor of biological sciences.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING:

FIRST—Igor Kevin Mkam Tsengam of Cameroon, a senior chemical engineering major advised by Santanu Kundu, assistant professor of chemical engineering.

SECOND—Tu “Tom” Zhang of Starkville, a junior mechanical engineering major advised by Nima Shamsaei, assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

THIRD—Nicholas A. Ezzell of Laurel, a junior physics major advised by Nick Fitzkee, assistant professor of chemistry.

SOCIAL SCIENCES:

FIRST—Meredith D. Pearson of Starkville, a senior psychology major advised by Michael Nadorff, assistant professor of psychology.

SECOND—Seth A. Thomas of Brentwood, Tennessee, a sophomore psychology major advised by Jarrod Moss, associate professor of psychology.

THIRD—Audrey B. Sanderson of Birmingham, Alabama, a senior elementary education major advised by Kathleen Alley, assistant professor in the curriculum, instruction and special education department.

HONORABLE MENTION—Anna C. Wooten of Florence, a junior human sciences/fashion design and merchandising major advised by JuYoung Lee, assistant professor of human sciences.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND SERVICE LEARNING:

FIRST—Audrey B. Sanderson of Birmingham, Alabama, a senior elementary education major advised by Kathleen Alley, assistant professor in the curriculum, instruction and special education department.

SECOND—Anna K. Barr of Madison, Alabama, a senior architecture major advised by Alexis Gregory, assistant professor of architecture.

THIRD—Christine M. Dunn of Niceville, Florida, a senior secondary education/English education major advised by Judith Ridner, associate professor of history.

Featured speaker for the symposium was Erdogan Memili, associate professor in the animal and dairy sciences department, specializing in reproduction and development and functional genomics.

In addition to the honors college, the symposium is sponsored by the offices of the Provost and Executive President, and Research and Economic Development, along with the Center for the Advancement of Service-Learning Excellence, MSU Extension Service, National Strategic Planning and Analysis Research Center, and Phi Kappa Phi honor society.

Learn more about the Shackouls Honors College at www.honors.msstate.edu and twitter.com/ShackoulsHonors.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Download the program to read the students’ abstracts.

Baptist Town Neighborhood reinvestment project featured in Delta Business Journal

April 7th, 2016 Comments Off on Baptist Town Neighborhood reinvestment project featured in Delta Business Journal

image via deltabusinessjournal.com

image via deltabusinessjournal.com

By Angela Rogalski | Delta Business Journal

Baptist Town, about a mile east of downtown Greenwood, is a community that is solidly defined by its history and the common bond of its residents. Born in the 1800s, it is one of Greenwood’s oldest African American neighborhoods and is steeped in the rich culture that is the Mississippi Delta. Honeyboy Edwards and Robert Johnson were known to frequent Baptist Town during their lifetimes and it’s written that Edwards called it “the final residence of Robert Johnson” since the legendary Blues singer spent some of his last days in and around Baptist Town.

Today the community is going through a promising re-flourishment as the Baptist Town Neighborhood Reinvestment Project, planned in 2000, is still underway. Emily Roush-Elliott, a social impact architect, has been a long-time participant in the project.

“For the last three years I was an Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow, which was a wonderful position with the Greenwood, Leflore, Carroll Economic Development Foundation,” Roush-Elliott says. “The Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellowship partners early-career architectural designers with local community development organizations, where they facilitate an inclusive approach to development to create green, sustainable, and affordable communities. And even though I am no longer a Fellow, my work has actually continued. I still do about half-time, but have also had the opportunity to branch out and start my own design-build practice with my husband. So, we’re continuing the work I started as a Fellow most of the time, but also doing other projects as well.”

Roush-Elliott explains that Baptist Town history has deep roots and is very important to the city of Greenwood.

“Baptist Town is a neighborhood and not its own town at all; it’s part of Greenwood,” she explains. “We know that it’s at least 135 years old and is probably one of the first places where African Americans could own property in Mississippi after slavery ended. So, it has a really long history and is very important.”

While Baptist Town isn’t known for its economic wealth and prosperity, Roush-Elliott says it has so much more embedded within its historical core and is rich in many ways other than money.

“When newspapers write about Baptist Town it always makes me cringe, because invariably someone calls it this impoverished neighborhood. And I wish that they would clarify and say economically impoverished, because it is; from a financial and wealth standpoint it struggles, but from every other value standpoint, the more important ones, such as people taking care of each other, community identity and history and culture, it’s incredibly rich. It’s a wonderful neighborhood and has been studied by a lot of different people. Robert Johnson spent time in Baptist Town; part of the movie “The Help” was filmed there, so there’s a lot of tourism attractions to the community, which sometimes is a negative thing.”

In 2000, students from the Carl Small Town Center, which is a community design center out of the Mississippi State University School of Architecture, came over to Baptist Town and worked with the community and did architectural planning studies to determine the primary needs and goals of the neighborhood and come up with solutions.

“That was the beginning of the relationship between the Mississippi State University School of Architecture and the Carl Small Town Center and the Economic Development Foundation here in Greenwood,” Roush-Elliott says. “So years later, they partnered again and students came back and re-studied the neighborhood and created a masterplan with the community; they really specialize in listening and having community engagement sessions.”

The community had some top priorities for Baptist Town, such as rehabbed and new housing; a community center; safer and better-looking entryways; a playground and parks. And all of these things became part of the masterplan.

“The Carl Small Town Center got together with the Greenwood, Leflore, Carroll Economic Development Foundation and applied to Enterprise Community Partners for an Enterprise Rose Fellow and they were awarded that fellow,” she says. “My husband and I had been working on rural development in Tanzania and we were looking to come back to the States and apply the things that we’d learned over there. So, when this opened up, we applied and we got it and we’ve been really working and focusing on Baptist Town since 2013.”

It was a three-year fellowship and with some funding that was already in place, Roush-Elliott, along with the Greenwood partners, was able to accomplish almost the entire masterplan that had been laid out years earlier.

“Five homes were rehabbed and we’re working on a couple of more now,” she says. “We did 11 new affordable homes and sold them to families who lived in the neighborhood for a cost that fit within their budgets. We purchased a building and rehabbed it for a community center that is open. It offers job training now and will offer other things in the future. We did street lights, sidewalks and signage, and landscaping at all of the entryways. We built two parks and one of them includes a playground.”

Roush-Elliott says those are the tangible things the project has been able to accomplish, but more than that are the relationships that have formed between the city and the people who live in Baptist Town.

“We’re most proud of the changes in people’s lives that we’ve seen,” she adds, “the things that the residents have been able to accomplish all on their own. The homeowners who are all first-time buyers, mostly people a little older in age who have never been able to own their own home before, are now doing it and it’s great. And none of it was gifted; they’re buying their homes. Whatever we invested to develop the home is what the mortgage became.”

John Poros was a teacher at the Mississippi State University School of Architecture and part of the original team that began the planning stages of the project in 2000. Today, Poros is the director of the Carl Small Town Center and is still involved with the ongoing improvements.

“The project got started with Fred Carl of Viking Range Corporation in Greenwood,” Poros says. “And Fred brought us (The Mississippi State School of Architecture) to the neighborhood back then and we had an architectural design studio that looked at the neighborhood then and the Carl Small Town Center gave a report on the project, but unfortunately at that time, we couldn’t get any traction with the project.”

Poros says a few years later, when all of the current partners got involved, they began to see the project move forward.

“The masterplan that we came up with actually won a National American Planning Association Award and once that happened we were able to get funding from the Foundation for the Mid- South, which was about $300,000. Then we were able to move forward and start the work in the neighborhood. That’s when I knew that we had to get Emily Roush-Elliott involved, and on behalf of the Carl Small Town Center, I applied for the Enterprise Rose Fellowship.”

Poros said the Center’s involvement with the project is still strong. “We at the Carl Small Town Center have been working with Emily over the past three years, during her Fellowship to help. Right now, we’re partnering with her to get smaller projects done in the neighborhood by bringing students or faculty members in to help. It’s been an incredible experience and really what you love to see if you’re doing community design. When you can really affect people’s lives and see those results, such as the first-time homeowners; it’s great.”

Alice Leflore is a Baptist Town resident and has been for most of her life. She’s also chair of the management board for the Baptist Town Community Development Center.

“Baptist Town is my home and I have lived there for the majority of my life,” Leflore says. “All of us who live there have always wanted to see our neighborhood improved and revived. It’s our home and we knew what it had once been before the deterioration begun in the late 90s and early 2000s. So, I wanted the neighborhood to be improved and to have the same pride, if not more, than it once had.”

Leflore welcomes the changes that she has seen since the project began and hopes that the progress continues.

“One of the things that I love is the fact that for most of the people in the homes, this is the first time they have ever owned their own home,” Leflore says. “And it’s a really wonderful thing for them. Unfortunately, we have had three people to pass away since they moved into their own home, but I am thankful that they died owning that home that they never thought they would. And I’m happy that we’re on our way to accomplishing the things that we set out to accomplish. We are non-profit now at the Center, so we can go after more programs to assist people and get more things started. So, we are moving forward.”

National design competition honors another MSU architecture major

March 31st, 2016 Comments Off on National design competition honors another MSU architecture major

Rashida L. “Mo” Momoh (Photo by Russ Houston)

Rashida L. “Mo” Momoh (Photo by Russ Houston)

A senior West Tennessee architecture major at Mississippi State is continuing the university’s winning tradition in a national urban design competition.

Rashidat L. “Mo” Momoh of Memphis finished second in the recent eighth annual Gensler Diversity Scholarship Competition. She is a 2012 graduate of Arlington High School.

Gensler is an international architecture, design and planning firm of more than 5,000 professionals working throughout the Americas, Asia, Europe, Australia and the Middle East. Over the past 16 years, it has provided more than $200,000 in academic awards to students and graduates.

The annual design competition is open to African-American students at all U.S. not-for-profit educational institutions. Entrants must be entering their final year in academic programs that hold National Architectural Accrediting Board certification.

Momoh is the third MSU architecture major to win a top Gensler award in as many years. Larry Travis Jr. of Tougaloo won first place in 2014, while Aryn S. Phillips of Olive Branch finished in second place last year.

“We’ve had a long history with Gensler, so it’s always been in the back of my brain to apply,” Momoh said.

Her competition entry was a project completed earlier in an MSU School of Architecture studio course taught by assistant professor Jacob Gines. Set in New York City’s Manhattan borough and situated near Central Park, it involved the design of a mid-rise building to be constructed primarily of wood.

“The project really challenged me to think about tectonics in a more detailed way than I had the opportunity to in previous semesters,” Momoh explained. A video of her entry may be viewed at https://vimeo.com/158229121.

Since all final projects had to be hand-drawn, student designers were required to be more conscientious about composition. “That gave us the opportunity to understand the building at a deeper level than working on a computer would have,” Momoh said.

In addition to a scholarship, she has been offered a paid summer internship with Gensler’s Boston office.

In noting that Boston was her top internship choice, Momoh expressed appreciation to Gensler officials for the honors. The internship “aligns with how I approach architecture in terms of design and what I want to do to help people in the community,” she emphasized.

Looking to the future, she expressed hope that the Boston experience will help greatly enhance her career opportunities. “I’m going to gain so much knowledge about the architecture practice, as well as design for a community,” she said.

To help further expand her marketable skills, Momoh also is pursuing an overseas cooperative education experience that would precede her required fifth and final year of School of Architecture study in Jackson.

For more information about the Gensler Diversity Scholarship, visit www.gensler.com/scholarships.

See the story at msstate.edu.

School of Architecture awards second Method Studio Undergraduate Research Fellowship

March 7th, 2016 Comments Off on School of Architecture awards second Method Studio Undergraduate Research Fellowship

Holmes_Edward mug

Holmes

A Mississippi State architecture major is among the second to receive the newly established Method Studio Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

Fourth-year student Edward Holmes V is receiving $1,500 as he spends the spring semester conducting research with Method Studio, a full-service architectural and design firm based in Salt Lake City, Utah. Upon successful completion of research project/s, Holmes will receive an additional $1,500 in May.

This summer, Holmes – a graduate of Newton County Academy and son of Bill and Jami Herrington – will serve as the student director for the school’s annual Design Discovery Workshop, a week-long camp for high school students and incoming freshmen that is intended to answer many of the questions about architecture and interior design as a field of study and as a profession.

“It is a great honor to be able to be able to research for Method Studo,” said Holmes. “I know that I have a lot to learn from them, and I’m sure this will be an exciting experience.”

As part of the fellowship, Holmes will working under the guidance of Jacob Gines, a School of Architecture assistant professor who also is Method’s vice president of research and design.

Gines, now in his fourth year on the Starkville campus, said he and other professionals at the Utah firm are working to make it a “thought leader” in the architectural community, both to generate and disseminate knowledge. “There is a lot of support for connecting academia to the profession of architecture,” he added.

Gines said the new fellowship should provide “a unique opportunity” to strengthen that connection between the architecture school and Method.

School director Michael Berk said he and his colleagues “are honored to be working with Method Studio and value the confidence the firm has placed in the School of Architecture.”

“This research collaboration is an important endorsement of our faculty expertise and will provide our faculty with research assistants, enabling us to continue to push the boundaries of cutting-edge tectonic research,” said Berk, who also holds the school’s F.L. Crane Professorship.

While Method is not local, Gines said fellows will be researching a variety of issues that are transportable across geographic regions. “There is strength and value in connecting not just locally, but at a distance as well,” he said.

For details about Method Studio, visit www.method-studio.com.

Click here to read about the school’s first Method Fellow, Maria Degtyareva.

Architecture professor, students continue collaborative project for Boys & Girls Club

January 15th, 2016 Comments Off on Architecture professor, students continue collaborative project for Boys & Girls Club

Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory is continuing her work this semester on a collaborative project to design and construct an educational garden for the Boys & Girls Club of the Golden Triangle – Starkville.

Gregory began the project with her fourth-year architecture studio in the fall. (Read more here.)

This semester, the project will continue through a design/build elective where students in the School of Architecture are constructing another piece of the educational garden – one of the shade structures.

Students in the course are also working on new designs for compost bins, as well as documentation for the new construction and work this spring.

The group is raising funds to help pay for the construction of the educational garden via Go Fund Me at https://www.gofundme.com/msu-learn-and-grow.

Additional information and project updates can be found on the MSU Learn & Grow Facebook page, the Twitter feed and Instagram page.

S|ARC senior receives Association of Retired Faculty honor

December 11th, 2015 Comments Off on S|ARC senior receives Association of Retired Faculty honor

F.L. Crane Professor Michael Berk, director of the School of Architecture, attended the reception honoring fourth-year architecture student Ria Bennett

F.L. Crane Professor Michael Berk, director of the School of Architecture, attended the reception honoring fourth-year architecture student Ria Bennett

By Zack Plair | Mississippi State University

Five seniors at Mississippi State are 2015 honorees of the university’s Association of Retired Faculty.

Honored at the organization’s annual undergraduate banquet were Aaron “Ria” Bennett, an architecture major from Birmingham, Alabama; Kylie A. Dennis, an English major from Memphis, Tennessee; Regan D. McNerny, a biochemistry major from Hebron; Harrison R. Warren, a mechanical engineering major from Starkville; and Laura E. Wilson, a civil engineering major from Diamondhead.

Founded in 1986, MSU’s Association of Retired Faculty presents awards that serve as tributes or memorials to campus colleagues and association members who made major contributions to student development over their careers at the 137-year-old land-grant institution.

Of this year’s honorees:

Bennett received the William L. Giles Award for Excellence in Architecture. She is a member of the Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honor Society and the National Organization of Minority Architecture Students. She also has served as Giles Architecture Gallery coordinator on campus and was a member of the team that won the Design/Build Studio Choctaw Bus Shelter Competition in 2013. Bennett has interned for two summers with Christopher Architects and Interiors in Birmingham.

Dennis received the Peyton Ward Williams Jr. Distinguished Writing Award for the second straight year. She is a member of three honor societies at MSU, including the Society of Scholars, and holder of three English department scholarships. She was one of only seven students nationwide accepted to participate in the prestigious Institute for Transforming Social Justice this past summer, and she now is student director of the newly formed College of Arts and Sciences Social Justice Initiative. Dennis is in her second year as editor of MSU’s creative arts journal, “The Streetcar.”  She has presented her research at both student and professional conferences, and her work has been published two consecutive years in the Proceedings of the National Conference for Undergraduate Research.

McNerny received the Charles L. Lindley Leadership Award. She is a member of the Lambda Sigma Honor Society and a Mississippi Rural Dentistry Scholarship Program recipient. She has served as president of MSU’s Pre-Dental Society, president and recruitment chair for College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Ambassadors and Residence Hall Association treasurer. She’s held two positions with the Student Association, including chair for the Senate Rules and Legislation Committee, and History and Traditions Committee member. Dennis has logged more than 200 shadowing/community service hours with eight different practices related to dentistry and oral-maxillofacial surgery.

Warren was selected for the Exemplary Service Award honoring Joseph Brown, a retired professor of mechanical engineering. A member of the Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi honor societies, he began researching combined heat and power systems this summer. As an undergraduate, he has already been published in an academic journal. Also, he works for the MSU men’s tennis team.

Wilson received the Harry Charles F. Simrall Award for Engineering Excellence. She serves as project manager and past president of MSU’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders and president of the Soil and Water Conservation Society. She is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Women’s Advisory Committee for Civil and Environmental Engineers, and the Terpsichore Dance Theatre Company on campus.

The RFA awards are memorials to Giles, MSU’s 13th president; Lindley, dean of the then-College of Agriculture and Home Economics; Simrall, dean of the then-College of Engineering; and Williams, an English professor and editor of the campus-based Mississippi Quarterly.

Brown, a Starkville resident, began teaching at MSU in 1970 and was a faculty member for more than 20 years.

MSU architecture school ranks among best nationally

December 10th, 2015 Comments Off on MSU architecture school ranks among best nationally

Senior architecture major Larry Travis of Tougaloo utilizes work space in Giles Hall, home of MSU’s School of Architecture and the College of Architecture, Art and Design. (Photo by Megan Bean)

Senior architecture major Larry Travis of Tougaloo utilizes work space in Giles Hall, home of MSU’s School of Architecture and the College of Architecture, Art and Design. (Photo by Megan Bean)

By Zack Plair | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University’s School of Architecture is ranked among the top programs in the country for preparing students for the workforce.

Produced by the Design Futures Council, the publication DesignIntelligence ranks MSU’s School of Architecture at No. 25 among “America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools” for 2016.

DesignIntelligence annually ranks the top 35 of the 120 accredited programs nationwide by surveying supervisors and others in hiring positions at leading architecture and design firms on which schools best prepare students for those fields. This year, more than 1,400 professional practice organizations participated in the survey, according to the DesignIntelligence website.

“This national ranking speaks volumes of the high quality professional education that our students receive at MSU,” said Michael Berk, director for the School of Architecture and F.L. Crane Endowed Professor. “Our outstanding faculty are leading the nation in innovative Collaborative Practice studio-teaching with Building Construction Science, as well as focusing on design/build tectonics, fundamental design, and our commitment in providing guaranteed travel experiences to see architecture and urbanism with our rigorous field-trip and study-abroad programs.”

MSU architecture team leads weatherization efforts in Delta

December 4th, 2015 Comments Off on MSU architecture team leads weatherization efforts in Delta

Greenwood_2 copy

Edward Holmes and Ben Marshall, fourth-year architecture students and members of the Audit Squad, work in Greenwood. (photo via Emily McGlohn)

By Zack Plair | Mississippi State University

A project through Mississippi State University’s School of Architecture is helping make homes in the Mississippi Delta healthier and more energy efficient.

Using funds from the Greenwood Leflore Carroll Economic Development Foundation and Enterprise Community Partners, a team from Mississippi State studied air infiltration levels in 27 low-income homes in the Greenwood area during the summer. Starting Monday [Dec. 7], the team will begin the process of weatherizing homes from the study to enable better climate control and reduce homeowners’ utility bills.

Emily McGlohn, an assistant professor of architecture at MSU who is the faculty leader for the study, said the team looked at houses in three categories: 10 older homes built in the 1950s and 60s, six built in the 1980s and 90s, and 11 “Katrina cottages” placed in the Baptist Town area in Greenwood for low-income families within the last 10 years.

Preliminary study results, McGlohn said, showed the most air infiltration in the older homes. That poses a financial and health burden on the residents, she added.

“A home is supposed to keep you warm in the winter and cool in the summer,” she said. “But in a leaky home, it makes it harder and more costly to maintain those temperatures during those seasons.”

Now that the study is complete, McGlohn’s team – which includes mostly student workers – has secured the labor and materials for basic weatherization at the 27 homes. With the homeowners’ consent, McGlohn said the team could install door sweeps, weather stripping around windows and better insulate areas around air conditioning units in windows that tend to let air into the home. Even those small fixes, she said, could make a big impact.

Further, she is presenting the study results to stakeholders in the Delta in hopes of inspiring a more comprehensive weatherization program and ensuring that low-income homes built in the future are more energy efficient.

Greenwood architect Emily Roush-Elliot, an Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow cohosted by the Greenwood Leflore Carroll Economic Development Foundation and MSU’s Carl Small Town Center, partnered with McGlohn’s team on the project. She said it has already accomplished much, considering its $12,000 budget, and has the potential to accomplish even more.

“Financially, it will help a substantial number of low-income families,” she said. “It’s easy to scale up, too. I hope this is a small first step to so much more.”

Read more about the work.

Fourth-year architecture student featured as ‘State Spotlight’

December 4th, 2015 Comments Off on Fourth-year architecture student featured as ‘State Spotlight’


state spotlight 12042015

Room for Growth

Senior architecture major Zachary White, of Valparaiso, Indiana, works on a raised garden bed for the Starkville Boys and Girls Club community garden. A team of 14 Mississippi State architecture students, working under assistant professor Alexis Gregory, are installing a garden at the club with six raised beds, two shaded pavilions and space for tool storage. The team also is partnering with MSU’s Horticulture Club, the Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion, and the College of Education to make the garden a sustainable source for education and healthy foods.

Photo by: Megan Bean

Herrmann accepts Design Excellence Award from AIA Mississippi Chapter

December 3rd, 2015 Comments Off on Herrmann accepts Design Excellence Award from AIA Mississippi Chapter

Mississippi State University recently was recognized by the state chapter of the American Institute of Architects for its role in implementing the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum’s green technology demonstration pavilion. Pictured at AIAMS 2015 Mississippi Celebrates Architecture program are (l-r) lead juror Aaron Gentry, principal at tvsdesign in Atlanta, Georgia; Jim West, dean of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design and chair of the AIAMS Design Awards; Hans C. Herrmann, MSU associate professor of architecture; and AIAMS President Brett Couples. (Photo courtesy of barrettphotography.com)

Mississippi State University recently was recognized by the state chapter of the American Institute of Architects for its role in implementing the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum’s green technology demonstration pavilion. Pictured at AIAMS 2015 Mississippi Celebrates Architecture program are (l-r) lead juror Aaron Gentry, principal at tvsdesign in Atlanta, Georgia; Jim West, dean of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design and chair of the AIAMS Design Awards; Hans C. Herrmann, MSU associate professor of architecture; and AIAMS President Brett Couples. (Photo courtesy of barrettphotography.com)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State is yet again being recognized for its role in implementing the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum’s green infrastructure and sustainable building technologies.

A Design Excellence Award from the American Institute of Architects’ Mississippi Chapter is one of only two being presented this year. It recognizes the five-year-long efforts of more than 200 university undergraduate and graduate students who designed and built the repository’s green technology demonstration pavilion, among other features.

Participating students were majors in landscape architecture, landscape contracting, architecture, art, art/graphic design and building construction science.

Including prominent architects and educators, the AIAMS judging panel was led by Aaron Gentry, principal at tvsdesign of Atlanta, Georgia, and an MSU architecture graduate.

Hans C. Herrmann, associate professor of architecture, accepted for the university at the recent annual Mississippi Celebrates Architecture program in Jackson.

Earlier this year, the Starkville project was recognized with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 4’s Rain Catcher Award at the neighborhood/community level. In 2013, it was chosen for the American Society of Landscape Architecture’s Award of Excellence in Student Collaboration, the highest honor bestowed by the national professional association for landscape architects. Other honors have included the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture’s 2015 Collaborative Practice Award, as well as the American Society of Landscape Architects/Mississippi Chapter’s 2013 Merit Award, 2012 community service honor, and 2011 and 2012 merit awards for community service.

The green technology demonstration pavilion at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum was recognized with an AIAMS Design Excellence Award. (Photo by Megan Bean)

The green technology demonstration pavilion at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum was recognized with an AIAMS Design Excellence Award. (Photo by Megan Bean)

Located near campus at the intersection of Fellowship and Russell streets, the museum features an American Disabilities Act-compliant entrance way, as well as a circular stair providing public access to the 600-square-foot green-roof pavilion. A 700-square-foot rain garden, 200-square-foot sand filter and more than 1,000 square-feet of new plantings also are part of the project.

Additionally, an adjacent 1,000-gallon rainwater cistern was built from recycled and repurposed materials.

The AIAMS Design Awards program seeks to elevate the quality of architecture by recognizing and honoring works of distinction by its members, as well as raise public awareness of architecture and design. For more, visit www.aiamississippi.org.

The heritage museum is open to the public 1-4 p.m., Tuesday-Thursday, as well as by appointment. Admission is free, but donations are encouraged. For more, visit www.oktibbehaheritagemuseum.com.

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