Architecture professor, students continue collaborative project for Boys & Girls Club

January 15th, 2016 Comments Off on Architecture professor, students continue collaborative project for Boys & Girls Club

Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory is continuing her work this semester on a collaborative project to design and construct an educational garden for the Boys & Girls Club of the Golden Triangle – Starkville.

Gregory began the project with her fourth-year architecture studio in the fall. (Read more here.)

This semester, the project will continue through a design/build elective where students in the School of Architecture are constructing another piece of the educational garden – one of the shade structures.

Students in the course are also working on new designs for compost bins, as well as documentation for the new construction and work this spring.

The group is raising funds to help pay for the construction of the educational garden via Go Fund Me at https://www.gofundme.com/msu-learn-and-grow.

Additional information and project updates can be found on the MSU Learn & Grow Facebook page, the Twitter feed and Instagram page.

S|ARC senior receives Association of Retired Faculty honor

December 11th, 2015 Comments Off on S|ARC senior receives Association of Retired Faculty honor

F.L. Crane Professor Michael Berk, director of the School of Architecture, attended the reception honoring fourth-year architecture student Ria Bennett

F.L. Crane Professor Michael Berk, director of the School of Architecture, attended the reception honoring fourth-year architecture student Ria Bennett

By Zack Plair | Mississippi State University

Five seniors at Mississippi State are 2015 honorees of the university’s Association of Retired Faculty.

Honored at the organization’s annual undergraduate banquet were Aaron “Ria” Bennett, an architecture major from Birmingham, Alabama; Kylie A. Dennis, an English major from Memphis, Tennessee; Regan D. McNerny, a biochemistry major from Hebron; Harrison R. Warren, a mechanical engineering major from Starkville; and Laura E. Wilson, a civil engineering major from Diamondhead.

Founded in 1986, MSU’s Association of Retired Faculty presents awards that serve as tributes or memorials to campus colleagues and association members who made major contributions to student development over their careers at the 137-year-old land-grant institution.

Of this year’s honorees:

Bennett received the William L. Giles Award for Excellence in Architecture. She is a member of the Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honor Society and the National Organization of Minority Architecture Students. She also has served as Giles Architecture Gallery coordinator on campus and was a member of the team that won the Design/Build Studio Choctaw Bus Shelter Competition in 2013. Bennett has interned for two summers with Christopher Architects and Interiors in Birmingham.

Dennis received the Peyton Ward Williams Jr. Distinguished Writing Award for the second straight year. She is a member of three honor societies at MSU, including the Society of Scholars, and holder of three English department scholarships. She was one of only seven students nationwide accepted to participate in the prestigious Institute for Transforming Social Justice this past summer, and she now is student director of the newly formed College of Arts and Sciences Social Justice Initiative. Dennis is in her second year as editor of MSU’s creative arts journal, “The Streetcar.”  She has presented her research at both student and professional conferences, and her work has been published two consecutive years in the Proceedings of the National Conference for Undergraduate Research.

McNerny received the Charles L. Lindley Leadership Award. She is a member of the Lambda Sigma Honor Society and a Mississippi Rural Dentistry Scholarship Program recipient. She has served as president of MSU’s Pre-Dental Society, president and recruitment chair for College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Ambassadors and Residence Hall Association treasurer. She’s held two positions with the Student Association, including chair for the Senate Rules and Legislation Committee, and History and Traditions Committee member. Dennis has logged more than 200 shadowing/community service hours with eight different practices related to dentistry and oral-maxillofacial surgery.

Warren was selected for the Exemplary Service Award honoring Joseph Brown, a retired professor of mechanical engineering. A member of the Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi honor societies, he began researching combined heat and power systems this summer. As an undergraduate, he has already been published in an academic journal. Also, he works for the MSU men’s tennis team.

Wilson received the Harry Charles F. Simrall Award for Engineering Excellence. She serves as project manager and past president of MSU’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders and president of the Soil and Water Conservation Society. She is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Women’s Advisory Committee for Civil and Environmental Engineers, and the Terpsichore Dance Theatre Company on campus.

The RFA awards are memorials to Giles, MSU’s 13th president; Lindley, dean of the then-College of Agriculture and Home Economics; Simrall, dean of the then-College of Engineering; and Williams, an English professor and editor of the campus-based Mississippi Quarterly.

Brown, a Starkville resident, began teaching at MSU in 1970 and was a faculty member for more than 20 years.

MSU architecture school ranks among best nationally

December 10th, 2015 Comments Off on MSU architecture school ranks among best nationally

Senior architecture major Larry Travis of Tougaloo utilizes work space in Giles Hall, home of MSU’s School of Architecture and the College of Architecture, Art and Design. (Photo by Megan Bean)

Senior architecture major Larry Travis of Tougaloo utilizes work space in Giles Hall, home of MSU’s School of Architecture and the College of Architecture, Art and Design. (Photo by Megan Bean)

By Zack Plair | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University’s School of Architecture is ranked among the top programs in the country for preparing students for the workforce.

Produced by the Design Futures Council, the publication DesignIntelligence ranks MSU’s School of Architecture at No. 25 among “America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools” for 2016.

DesignIntelligence annually ranks the top 35 of the 120 accredited programs nationwide by surveying supervisors and others in hiring positions at leading architecture and design firms on which schools best prepare students for those fields. This year, more than 1,400 professional practice organizations participated in the survey, according to the DesignIntelligence website.

“This national ranking speaks volumes of the high quality professional education that our students receive at MSU,” said Michael Berk, director for the School of Architecture and F.L. Crane Endowed Professor. “Our outstanding faculty are leading the nation in innovative Collaborative Practice studio-teaching with Building Construction Science, as well as focusing on design/build tectonics, fundamental design, and our commitment in providing guaranteed travel experiences to see architecture and urbanism with our rigorous field-trip and study-abroad programs.”

MSU architecture team leads weatherization efforts in Delta

December 4th, 2015 Comments Off on MSU architecture team leads weatherization efforts in Delta

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Edward Holmes and Ben Marshall, fourth-year architecture students and members of the Audit Squad, work in Greenwood. (photo via Emily McGlohn)

By Zack Plair | Mississippi State University

A project through Mississippi State University’s School of Architecture is helping make homes in the Mississippi Delta healthier and more energy efficient.

Using funds from the Greenwood Leflore Carroll Economic Development Foundation and Enterprise Community Partners, a team from Mississippi State studied air infiltration levels in 27 low-income homes in the Greenwood area during the summer. Starting Monday [Dec. 7], the team will begin the process of weatherizing homes from the study to enable better climate control and reduce homeowners’ utility bills.

Emily McGlohn, an assistant professor of architecture at MSU who is the faculty leader for the study, said the team looked at houses in three categories: 10 older homes built in the 1950s and 60s, six built in the 1980s and 90s, and 11 “Katrina cottages” placed in the Baptist Town area in Greenwood for low-income families within the last 10 years.

Preliminary study results, McGlohn said, showed the most air infiltration in the older homes. That poses a financial and health burden on the residents, she added.

“A home is supposed to keep you warm in the winter and cool in the summer,” she said. “But in a leaky home, it makes it harder and more costly to maintain those temperatures during those seasons.”

Now that the study is complete, McGlohn’s team – which includes mostly student workers – has secured the labor and materials for basic weatherization at the 27 homes. With the homeowners’ consent, McGlohn said the team could install door sweeps, weather stripping around windows and better insulate areas around air conditioning units in windows that tend to let air into the home. Even those small fixes, she said, could make a big impact.

Further, she is presenting the study results to stakeholders in the Delta in hopes of inspiring a more comprehensive weatherization program and ensuring that low-income homes built in the future are more energy efficient.

Greenwood architect Emily Roush-Elliot, an Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow cohosted by the Greenwood Leflore Carroll Economic Development Foundation and MSU’s Carl Small Town Center, partnered with McGlohn’s team on the project. She said it has already accomplished much, considering its $12,000 budget, and has the potential to accomplish even more.

“Financially, it will help a substantial number of low-income families,” she said. “It’s easy to scale up, too. I hope this is a small first step to so much more.”

Read more about the work.

Fourth-year architecture student featured as ‘State Spotlight’

December 4th, 2015 Comments Off on Fourth-year architecture student featured as ‘State Spotlight’


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Room for Growth

Senior architecture major Zachary White, of Valparaiso, Indiana, works on a raised garden bed for the Starkville Boys and Girls Club community garden. A team of 14 Mississippi State architecture students, working under assistant professor Alexis Gregory, are installing a garden at the club with six raised beds, two shaded pavilions and space for tool storage. The team also is partnering with MSU’s Horticulture Club, the Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion, and the College of Education to make the garden a sustainable source for education and healthy foods.

Photo by: Megan Bean

Herrmann accepts Design Excellence Award from AIA Mississippi Chapter

December 3rd, 2015 Comments Off on Herrmann accepts Design Excellence Award from AIA Mississippi Chapter

Mississippi State University recently was recognized by the state chapter of the American Institute of Architects for its role in implementing the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum’s green technology demonstration pavilion. Pictured at AIAMS 2015 Mississippi Celebrates Architecture program are (l-r) lead juror Aaron Gentry, principal at tvsdesign in Atlanta, Georgia; Jim West, dean of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design and chair of the AIAMS Design Awards; Hans C. Herrmann, MSU associate professor of architecture; and AIAMS President Brett Couples. (Photo courtesy of barrettphotography.com)

Mississippi State University recently was recognized by the state chapter of the American Institute of Architects for its role in implementing the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum’s green technology demonstration pavilion. Pictured at AIAMS 2015 Mississippi Celebrates Architecture program are (l-r) lead juror Aaron Gentry, principal at tvsdesign in Atlanta, Georgia; Jim West, dean of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design and chair of the AIAMS Design Awards; Hans C. Herrmann, MSU associate professor of architecture; and AIAMS President Brett Couples. (Photo courtesy of barrettphotography.com)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State is yet again being recognized for its role in implementing the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum’s green infrastructure and sustainable building technologies.

A Design Excellence Award from the American Institute of Architects’ Mississippi Chapter is one of only two being presented this year. It recognizes the five-year-long efforts of more than 200 university undergraduate and graduate students who designed and built the repository’s green technology demonstration pavilion, among other features.

Participating students were majors in landscape architecture, landscape contracting, architecture, art, art/graphic design and building construction science.

Including prominent architects and educators, the AIAMS judging panel was led by Aaron Gentry, principal at tvsdesign of Atlanta, Georgia, and an MSU architecture graduate.

Hans C. Herrmann, associate professor of architecture, accepted for the university at the recent annual Mississippi Celebrates Architecture program in Jackson.

Earlier this year, the Starkville project was recognized with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 4’s Rain Catcher Award at the neighborhood/community level. In 2013, it was chosen for the American Society of Landscape Architecture’s Award of Excellence in Student Collaboration, the highest honor bestowed by the national professional association for landscape architects. Other honors have included the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture’s 2015 Collaborative Practice Award, as well as the American Society of Landscape Architects/Mississippi Chapter’s 2013 Merit Award, 2012 community service honor, and 2011 and 2012 merit awards for community service.

The green technology demonstration pavilion at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum was recognized with an AIAMS Design Excellence Award. (Photo by Megan Bean)

The green technology demonstration pavilion at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum was recognized with an AIAMS Design Excellence Award. (Photo by Megan Bean)

Located near campus at the intersection of Fellowship and Russell streets, the museum features an American Disabilities Act-compliant entrance way, as well as a circular stair providing public access to the 600-square-foot green-roof pavilion. A 700-square-foot rain garden, 200-square-foot sand filter and more than 1,000 square-feet of new plantings also are part of the project.

Additionally, an adjacent 1,000-gallon rainwater cistern was built from recycled and repurposed materials.

The AIAMS Design Awards program seeks to elevate the quality of architecture by recognizing and honoring works of distinction by its members, as well as raise public awareness of architecture and design. For more, visit www.aiamississippi.org.

The heritage museum is open to the public 1-4 p.m., Tuesday-Thursday, as well as by appointment. Admission is free, but donations are encouraged. For more, visit www.oktibbehaheritagemuseum.com.

Gregory’s fourth-year architecture studio featured on WTVA news

November 30th, 2015 Comments Off on Gregory’s fourth-year architecture studio featured on WTVA news

Via WTVA.com

Unique project offers many forms of learning

An unusual architecture project in Starkville may turn into a gift that lasts a lifetime and teaches in so many ways.

Fourth-year architecture students at Mississippi State are building raised gardens at the Boys and Girls Club in Starkville. The new beds — which feature gravel bottoms, cardboard linings and special material to keep out weeds and moles while allowing dainage, benches and other features — will be more efficient than existing smaller beds at the center on Lynn Lane.

The students designed the garden as well as a ramp that will allow a handicapped volunteer, who also is a Master Gardener, to be more involved. The ramp even will have access to an herb garden.

“To help them understand what it’s like to work with a real client, and also to see the impact of their design and construction in the community. So want them to be able to see that architecture doesn’t end with a building that has air conditioning and heating but that it is actually creating space and places that people can use,” Professor Alexis Gregory said of some of the goals she had when the class took up the project, which also counts as a service-learning project.

Gregory is familiar with the community service and non-profit side, previously having worked for non-profits in Washington D.C.

Architecture students aren’t the only ones involved.

Horticulture classes are planning fruits and vegetables for the gardens and will help teach the kids and their families next spring. Education students are working on lesson plans for teachers to link the garden to every day learning. Nutrition students are planning lessons as well for the students and their amilies.

“I’m really excited to see the kids come out and play with the benches, to start planting things and see them grow,” Gregory said of the anticipation of what’s ahead.

Kids grew tomatoes, pumpkins, radishes, lettuce and cabbage this fall and winter in their smaller boxes. But this takes learning to a new level.

“Some of our kids play and interact with the architecture students and they’ve never been exposed to hands-on building objects so to see them get excited gets me excited. I know our kids aren’t exposed to nutrition and gardening and they should be,”  BGC Unit Director Jeffery Johnson said of the experience for the kids.

One major goal is to get entire families and community groups involved so the experience carries on.

“We can work with the Boys and Girls Club to make this a longer lasting project so this becomes good lessons for the kids, hopefully to take home to their parents, and their community as well and really spread this throughout the area,” Gregory xplained.

The project also will include shade structures, rain barrels, vegetable cubicles inside the Boys and Girls Club so the kids can store their produce and other items. Those will be built next semester.

Lowe’s, Oktibbeha County, Bell Building Supply, the Oktibbeha County Coop and others have donated materials. The project also has a Go Fund Me account. Anyone wishing to donate materials can contact the Boys and Girls Club.

Architecture student receives AIA St Louis Scholarship Award

November 18th, 2015 Comments Off on Architecture student receives AIA St Louis Scholarship Award

By Marissa Landon

Third-year architecture student Curtis Reed recently received a $500 AIA St Louis Scholarship Award.

According to the AIA St. Louis website, the scholarship fund was founded in 1965 to assist students from the greater St. Louis region enrolled in an architecture program accredited by the National Architecture Accrediting Board (NAAB). Today the AIA St. Louis Scholarship Fund is one of the largest scholarship programs in the country. Financial support is provided to students entering their third, fourth or fifth-year of studies.

“I’d like to give a big thanks to Bob Winters and the rest of the AIA Saint Louis board of directors for having chosen me to receive the summer scholarship for the 2015-2016 school year,” Reed said. “The cost of school these days is outrageous, but with the help from scholarships like this, I can continue to pursue this passion.”

 

Architecture student honored as 2015 Epting/Mathews Co-op Student of the Year

November 12th, 2015 Comments Off on Architecture student honored as 2015 Epting/Mathews Co-op Student of the Year

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(left to right): Joel Myers, Huntington Ingalls rep.; Ryan Colvin, senior coordinator at the MSU Career Center; Michael Berk, F.L. Crane Professor and director of the School of Architecture; Jake Johnson; Alexis Gregory, assistant professor and School of Architecture co-op coordinator; and Bryan Moore, Huntington Ingalls rep.

By Marrisa Landon

Jacob “Jake” Johnson, a fifth-year architecture student, has been named the 2015 Epting/Mathews Co-op Student of the Year. This award recognizes one outstanding co-op student at Mississippi State each year for academic excellence, exhibited professionalism in the work place and leadership in respective organizations.

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Jake Johnson

Johnson received a $500 scholarship sponsored by Huntington Ingalls and a recognition plaque. This marks the first year a non-engineering student has been selected as the Epting/Mathews Co-op Student of the Year.

Johnson completed a thirteen-month co-op with Seay, Seay & Litchfield Architects in Montgomery, Ala..

This co-op “allowed me to experience projects at every stage of development and to see first-hand the many roles that architects play,” said Johnson. “My time there greatly challenged my abilities, helped me understand my future goals within the field and has since impacted my work in the classroom.”

School of Architecture holds 2015 NOMAS Trashion Show

November 6th, 2015 Comments Off on School of Architecture holds 2015 NOMAS Trashion Show

TrashionShow2015 from Justin on Vimeo.

Mississippi State University’s seventh annual NOMAS Trashion Show was held on Wednesday [Nov. 4] at 7 p.m. in Giles Hall.

MSU Fashion Board models sported fashionable outfits designed by architecture, fashion design and merchandising students.

This years fashions were made from soda cans, water bottle labels, dryer sheets, straws, newspapers, bottle caps and other recycled goods.

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