Carl Joe Williams presents first fall 2017 Harrison Lecture

August 28th, 2017 Comments Off on Carl Joe Williams presents first fall 2017 Harrison Lecture

Images by Ryan Fierro

By Kelsey Brownlee

On Fri., Aug. 25, Carl Joe Williams presented the first Harrison Lecture for fall 2017. The event took place in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium in Giles Hall Auditorium at 4 p.m. 

Williams came and spoke about Blights Out, which he is a founding member of. Blights Out is a collective of artists, activists and architects working to imagine and design a new model for housing development centered outside the for-profit market; Blights Out generates dialogue, art and action to support the movement for permanently affordable housing and challenge blight, displacement and gentrification.

Williams’ work has been displayed in several venues throughout the United States, including Journeys, an installation at the Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and Williams’ Sculptural Trees installation on the median of Veterans Boulevard.

See the full Harrison Lecture Series schedule here.

School of Architecture announces 2017-2018 Giles Gallery exhibition schedule

August 23rd, 2017 Comments Off on School of Architecture announces 2017-2018 Giles Gallery exhibition schedule

Gulf Coast Community Design Studio partners with Boys and Girls Club

August 15th, 2017 Comments Off on Gulf Coast Community Design Studio partners with Boys and Girls Club

Elizabeth Englebretson of the MSU Gulf Coast Community Design Studio and members of the Boys & Girls Club’s Hancock County Unit look on Friday, Aug. 11, 2017, at a model of the Magnolia Bayou watershed they made on display in Bay St. Louis. (credit: John Fitzhugh jcfitzhugh@sunherald.com)

Via Jeff Clark | Sun Herald.com

What hidden Hancock County gem inspired the work of these 60 Coast kids?

A “hidden watershed in Bay St. Louis” is getting a lot of exposure thanks to a partnership between Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio and the Hancock County Boys & Girls Club. The project was a summer-long STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) education program.

The Magnolia Bayou Watershed in Bay St. Louis was the subject of a multimedia art exhibition that included the activation of a storefront at 122 Blaize Ave. in the Depot District. Some of the participants in the educational program drew sketches of wildlife on the watershed and built a 3D model of the ecosystem. The exhibit opened to the public Friday.

The exhibit also featured a 5-minute documentary, “Magnolia Bayou: Bay St. Louis’ Hidden Watershed,” which documents what the students learned about the watershed.

It was written and directed by Steve Barney of the Bay St. Louis Creative Arts Center . It contains video footage of Magnolia Bayou as well as still photography of the watershed.

“We had 60 about kids ranging in age from 9 to 14, and we were able to work with them several times, and we were able to get really in depth, especially with the artwork,” Blarney said. “The activities started at the beginning of the summer and around the last week in July, we started working with the kids intensively on the art work to culminate everything we learned this summer.”

 Blarney said the project was was designed to to hit three educational targets.

“We had three objectives, which was to have an outstanding learning outcome for the kids, educate the people of Bay St. Louis about the conservation of the fragile ecosystem and the third objective was to have a model which could be used by other grant recipients across the country,” he said. “I think we hit all of our goals.”

The young filmmaker

The five minute short film, which features the music of former Bay St. Louis resident Pete Fountain, highlights the 772 acres of streams known collectively as Magnolia Bayou Watershed. It enters the Bay of St. Louis at the Bay Waveland Yacht Club. The documentary creates the hypothesis that the estuary is shrinking because of commercial development in Hancock County.

Nick Bearden, 15, of Pass Christian, said he has been involved with film making and video editing sine he was nine. Nick did the drone shots, videography and editing for the documentary.

“I’m self taught,” he said. “I learned a lot by watching and uploading Youtube videos,” Nick said. “I watched a lot of tutorials.”

He said he learned a great deal about the watershed and conservation from working on the project.

“I had never really paid much attention the Bays St. Louis watershed and economic development is impacting this area,” Nick said. “It was very much an eye opener.”

Off the couches and working outside

The art exhibit was the culmination of a summer program where its participants spent several hours outdoors studying the ecosystem, by taking water samples and monitoring the native species of the bayou.

“Every day the bayou is more and more degraded and we have to be the ones that are going to save it,” said Boys & Girls Club member Sabrina Hoyt, 15. “It was a really good leaning experience.”

Devonte Han, 15, said he saw the program as a good way to learn something new.

“I did more of the art on this project,” Devonte said. “ I learned that the bayou is not doing so well because of how people are treating it and we need to treat it better.”

Read more from The Shoefly Magazine and The Sea Coast Echo

MSU architecture student honored by Building Technology Educators’ Society

July 5th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU architecture student honored by Building Technology Educators’ Society

Zachary Henry presenting at BTES 2017.

Henry at far right.

Henry is third from right.

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

A senior architecture major in Mississippi State’s College of Architecture, Art and Design recently received national recognition from the Building Technology Educators’ Society.

Zachary R. Henry of Knoxville, Tennessee, is one of only two students who were awarded scholarships by BTES during the nonprofit’s national conference in Des Moines, Iowa.

In addition to receiving a $500 travel scholarship, free conference admission and a complimentary BTES one-year membership, Henry presented his Best Undergraduate Paper award-winner “Ecological Functionalism in the Work of Glenn Murcutt: A Case Study of the Fredericks-White House” at the conference.

The BTES award jury concluded that Henry’s paper “gave a rare glimpse into a good topic of post-occupancy evaluation for a well-known architect.”

Research for the paper was conducted under the guidance of MSU Assistant Professor Emily McGlohn’s Audit Squad, an independent study course comprised of students exploring energy efficiency and the quality of construction.

Last summer, Henry traveled to Australia to conduct research and interview internationally renowned architect Glenn Murcutt. The opportunity was made possible by a $2,000 fellowship courtesy of MSU architecture alumnus Briar Jones and his wife Michelle. For more, visit https://www.msstate.edu/our-people/2016/10/zachary-r-henry.

A student in the university’s Judy and Bobby Shackouls Honors College, Henry plans to pursue a master’s degree in environmental design studies following graduation. He also expressed interest in moving to Nova Scotia and working for a highly respected firm that shares similar architectural values.

Founded in 1996, BTES is comprised of architectural educators who are passionate about teaching the technology of building design and construction. Its mission is to promote and publish the best pedagogic practices, relevant research, scholarship and other creative activity to facilitate student learning, advance innovation and enhance the status of disciplines in the profession at large. For more, visit http://btes.org.

The nationally accredited School of Architecture in MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design offers the only curriculum in the state leading to a professional degree in architecture. 

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

See the story in The Starkville Daily News.

See the story in the Mississippi Business Journal.

Alumna Janet Marie Smith named SportsBusiness Journal’s Champion

June 29th, 2017 Comments Off on Alumna Janet Marie Smith named SportsBusiness Journal’s Champion

Via Alumnus magazine

Janet Marie Smith (MSU BARC, ’81) has been named one of SportsBusiness Journal’s Champions: Pioneers and Innovators in Sports Business for 2017. She is senior vice president of planning and development for the Los Angeles Dodgers and has been involved in ballpark projects including the original design of Camden Yards in Baltimore, converting Atlanta’s Olympic Stadium to Turner Field and renovating Boston’s Fenway Park and L.A.’s Dodger Stadium.

Mississippi State University architecture students featured in Mississippi Business Journal

June 28th, 2017 Comments Off on Mississippi State University architecture students featured in Mississippi Business Journal

Ebony Batchelor

Tahir Khan

MSU students intern at Dale Partners Architects

Story and photos via msbusiness.com
Ebony Batchelor, a fifth-year Mississippi State University School of Architecture student, and Tahir Khan, a fourth-year MSU School of Architecture student, are interning at Dale Partners Architects this summer. Batchelor is working in the Jackson office, and Khan is in the Biloxi office.

Batchelor, a native of Scotland, grew up in Jackson, Tenn. Khan is a native of Gulfport.

Mississippi State architecture alumni join CDFL firm

June 28th, 2017 Comments Off on Mississippi State architecture alumni join CDFL firm

Clockwise, from left: Joshua Johnson, Samantha King, Ashton Polk, and Jared Robinson

Clockwise, from left: Joshua Johnson, Samantha King, Ashton Polk, and Jared Robinson (Image via CDFL)

Via CDFL

CDFL is thrilled to announce the addition of several new members to their team.

Joining their architecture studio are Mississippi State University graduates Joshua Johnson, Samantha King, and Jared Robinson. Ashton Polk, another Bulldog grad, is joining their administrative team. 

“It’s always exciting to see new faces join the CDFL family,” said President Rob Farr. “We’re delighted to add their fresh perspective and enthusiasm to an already talented and committed group.”

Read more at CDFL.com

MSU Gulf Coast Community Design Studio-led project receives $100,000 Knight Cities Challenge grant

June 14th, 2017 Comments Off on MSU Gulf Coast Community Design Studio-led project receives $100,000 Knight Cities Challenge grant

Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio is receiving a $100,000 grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation for a project that seeks to increase community engagement on the city of Biloxi’s once segregated beaches, the city’s primary recreation space. (Submitted photo/courtesy of David Perkes)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio is receiving a $100,000 grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation for a project that seeks to increase community engagement at the city of Biloxi’s primary recreation space.

Titled “Witnessing the Beach,” the project is among 33 winners of the foundation’s Knight Cities Challenge, which is designed to help spur civic innovation at the city, neighborhood and block levels through ideas generated by innovators from around the country.

Specifically, the challenge encourages applicants—nonprofits, for-profits and individuals, to name a few—to share ideas for making the 26 communities where the Knight brothers once owned newspapers more vibrant places to live and work. The challenge is made possible by The Knight Foundation, which supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. For more, visit http://knightcities.org.

This year, 4,500 applications were evaluated on the strength of the proposed project idea, its potential to advance talent, opportunity or engagement, and the plan to execute the project. Of those, 144 finalists were selected and evaluated on five criteria: impact, innovation, inspiration, learning and capacity. The Knight Foundation board of trustees chose 33 winners, including MSU’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio.

David Perkes, MSU professor and founding director of the Gulf Coast Community Design Studio, officially accepted the award Monday evening [June 12] in Miami, Florida. He was accompanied by Bill Raymond, historical administrator for the City of Biloxi, one of the project’s co-sponsors. Other partners include the Biloxi Chapter of the NAACP.

Perkes said the primary objective of the proposed “Witnessing the Beach” project is to create a culture of engagement on Biloxi’s once segregated beaches.

“Biloxi’s beach is the city’s most used public space, but it is typically not programmed and the public access is taken for granted,” he said. “The organized 1960’s wade-in protests challenged the segregation of Biloxi’s beaches. Programming the beach in the same places the wade-in demonstrations were organized will create a highly visible place for community engagement.”

 “Cities are the product of their place and culture,” Perkes continued. “Biloxi’s beach and its African American population are primary components of the city’s history and present condition,” Perkes continued. “The Wade-in protesters are now seniors, and their witnesses of work to overcome racial discrimination in 1960 are especially needed today.”

Perkes said the proposed project calls for the construction of movable platforms that will be positioned on the beach at several Wade-in protest sites. The movable platforms would be created by a large, roll-out surface on which chairs can be set up and shade from the sun can be provided.

Additionally, the platform will be designed to support exhibit panels, which will help create a pop-up gallery on the beach. This changing exhibit space will give artists and other storytellers a unique and very public venue to showcase and discuss their work, thereby advancing Biloxi’s creative culture, Perkes said.

“Creating a movable event and exhibit place with a surface that is accessible to people with mobility limitations will expand the beach’s use and bring heroic Civil Rights stories to life. The space will connect people of different generations and races with today’s artists and youth, so they can share past stories and discuss today’s concerns,” Perkes said.

The Gulf Coast Community Design Studio is a professional service and outreach program of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design. It was established in Biloxi in response to Hurricane Katrina to provide architectural design services, landscape and planning assistance, and educational opportunities and research to organizations and communities along the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

Through close, pragmatic partnerships, GCCDS works with local organizations and communities in and beyond Mississippi’s three coastal counties, putting professional expertise to work in an effort to shape vibrant and resilient Gulf Coast Communities. Learn more at gccds.org or www.msstate.edu/videos/2015/08/we-ring-true-gulf-coast-community-design-studio.

For more information on the GCCDS’s Knight Cities Challenge project, contact Perkes at 228-436-4661 or dperkes@gccds.msstate.edu.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Read the story in The Sun Herald.

 
 

Fred Carl Jr. featured in Mississippi Business Journal

June 2nd, 2017 Comments Off on Fred Carl Jr. featured in Mississippi Business Journal

via msbusiness.com

Fred Carl goes small with latest venture

By JACK WEATHERLY | Mississippi Business Journal

It is a market he helped to create.

Appointed by then-Gov. Haley Barbour as housing commissioner for Gulf Coast rebuilding after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Fred Carl Jr. oversaw the designing and building of cottages in a traditional style as a better alternative to trailers provided by the Federal Emergency Management Association.

The so-called Katrina cottages contributed to the “tiny house” trend.

Now in a crowded field – with cable television shows and magazines touting the little spaces – Carl believes he has found a niche.

Carl founded in the mid-’80s Viking Range, maker of one of the premier brands of residential cook stoves and other appliances.

He and other investors sold the Greenwood-based company to Middleby Corp. of Elgin, Ill., in 2013 for $380 million. Middleby sued the owners in 2015 for $100 million in a case that is still pending.

Now he has launched an equally upscale line of small dwellings.

Carl announced his new company, C3 Design Inc., two years ago. Carl said he would build what he called “modular” homes.

Instead Carl has introduced its first product line, the Retreat Series. Looking for all the world like houses, they are technically recreational vehicles, according to the company’s website, C3spaces.com, which was launched last week.

They are small, no more than 399 square feet not including the porch, which adds another 120 square feet.

Yet they are not really tiny houses in the usual sense.

Classified as “park models,” they are built “in compliance with Standard A119.5 of the American National Standards Institute,” the website states.

The website puts some space between the Retreat Series and tiny houses.

“There is no code or standard governing the design or construction of ‘tiny houses’ mounted on wheels, nor is there an established definition or specification for ‘tiny houses,’” the website says.

Chris Galusha, president of the all-volunteer American Tiny House Association, confirmed that there is indeed no such category.

Galusha said in an interview, however, that the International Code Council will include an appendix in the 2018 edition in the International Residential Code that will define a tiny home as any site-built home that’s less than 400 square feet of “habitable space,” excluding bathrooms and closets, Galusha said.

ANSI 119.5 is for part-time and recreational use, Galusha said. And something built to that standard, with third-party inspection and certification qualifies for insurance.

The Foremost Insurance Group, for example, does insure temporary homes, such as built by C3 Design, as well as modular and manufactured homes, which are considered permanent, said Chad Seabrook, owner of Chad Seabrook Insurance Agency in Ridgeland.

And it can insure tiny homes, he said.

The C3 website states that its park models are designed for temporary recreational use and for moving from one site to another. That means that insurance is generally cheaper for them than for fixed-place shelters, Seabrook said.

But the Retreat Series comes with a hefty price tag.

They start in the “mid-50s,” said Jane Crump, director of public relations and communications for the Greenwood-based manufacturer.

Looking at the price by square foot is the wrong way to price the units, Crump said. “It’s a lifestyle item,” she said.

“They’re definitely an upscale purchase,” Crump said, “for people with discretionary income.”

Standard features in the one-bedroom dwellings are a bathroom and a combined living and kitchen area and stainless-steel appliances and heating and cooling units. Upgrades are possible, such as quartz or granite countertops.

Crump said the company is in the early stages of distribution.

About a dozen have been sold, Crump said. The company has about a half-dozen for sale in Greenwood and Starkville.

Otherwise, they are built when ordered, she said.

“It’s a very measured process . . . to build a business from the ground up,” she said.

Crump would not discuss what C3 Designs future plans might be.

School of Architecture holds 2017 Recognition Day ceremony

May 10th, 2017 Comments Off on School of Architecture holds 2017 Recognition Day ceremony

Class of 2017: Front (L to R): Aryn Phillips, Kapish Cheema, Rachel Patronas, Jarrod Robinson, Josh Johnson; Middle (L to R): Morgan Powell, David Kett, Nathan Thomas, Ryan Fierro, Walter Carter, Sam Goodwin, Zac White, Garrett Yelverton, West Pierce, Mary Sanders, Ria Bennett; Back (L to R): Cody Smith, Tyler Warmath, Kevin Flores, Aaron Ellzey, Ashton Aime, Lucas Posey, Joseph Rose, Brandon Fairbanks, Ben Marshall, Luke Marshall.

Recognition Day for the School of Architecture was held on May 5, 2017, in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium in Giles Hall.

Jim West, dean of the College of Architecture, Art and Design, welcomed everyone and thanked parents, spouses, siblings, grandparents and other guests for supporting the graduates.

Director and F.L. Crane Professor Michael Berk introduced MSU Associate Provost for Academic Affairs Peter Ryan, Ph.D.

Ryan welcomed everyone to campus.

Belinda Stewart, FAIA, principal of Belinda Stewart Architects PA presented the 27th Annual Dr. William L. and Jean P. Giles Memorial Lecture.

The School of Architecture faculty members were recognized before announcing the awards.

2016-2017 School of Architecture awards:

Annual Allen & Hoshall Faculty Award
Recipient:  Jassen Callender
The architectural firm of Allen & Hoshall of Jackson, Mississippi, has established a $500 annual award to a faculty member “who has demonstrated excellence in teaching.” The award winners are selected by the fifth-year graduating class.

______________________________________________________

Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society (TSD)
Chapter President:  Ben Webster
Faculty Advisors:  Professor Jacob Gines and Professor Hans Herrmann
Tau Sigma Delta is the architectural (and allied programs) honor society open to top academic students in design disciplines. Induction does not occur until the student consistently demonstrates high academic standards and is in the third-year.

TSD Initiates:
Jake Gartman, Mitchell Hubbell, Matthew Lewis, Karly Morgan, Asher Paxton, Emily Turner, Leah Welborn

TSD Fifth-Year Graduates:
Ashton Aime, Ria Bennett, Ryan M. Fierro, Ben Marshall, West Pierce, Joseph Rose, Mary Sanders, Cody Smith

TSD Faculty Book Award
Recipient:  Professor Emily McGlohn
The Tau Sigma Delta Faculty Book Award is presented by the third- and fourth-year student members to the faculty member who has inspired them
to excellence.

________________________________________________________

National Organization of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS)
Chapter President:  Diondria Bingham
Presented By:  Elizabeth Bueche
Faculty Advisor:  Professor Emily McGlohn
National Organization of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS) is the student arm of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA). Students participating seek to enhance the educational experience of its members by fostering diversity within the School of Architecture and the community at-large.

The 2017 NOMAS Diversity Award
Recipient:  Diondria Bingham
Chosen by the NOMAS membership, the NOMAS Diversity Award is given to a
student who has shown outstanding initiative and leadership in promoting diversity within the School and the larger community.

______________________________________________________

Alpha Rho Chi (APX)
Chapter President:  Asher Paxton
Faculty Advisor:  Professor Justin Taylor
Alpha Rho Chi is the only national co-ed professional/social fraternity for architecture and the allied arts. MSU’s Hippodamus chapter includes members representing architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, and engineering. Their mission is academic excellence, and the group focuses on leadership, mentoring and professionalism.

Alpha Rho Chi Student Book Award
Recipient:  Lucas Posey
The Alpha Rho Chi student book award is given to a graduating fifth-year
architecture student who is an active member of Alpha Rho Chi who has
furthered the mission of the fraternity through service.

______________________________________________________          

American Institute of Architecture Students
Chapter President:  Hannah Hebinck
Faculty Advisor:  Dr. Fred Esenwein
American Institute of Architecture Students is the student counterpart of the American Institute of Architects. The chapter works closely with professional architects in the state through the Mississippi Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

AIAS Member of the Year Award
Recipient:  Hannah Hebinck
The recipient of the AIAS Award is chosen by the AIAS membership. The qualifications for this award are:  “…that the student goes above and beyond what
has been asked of him/her; has shown initiative and leadership qualities; has been
an AIAS leader within his/her year level; and does well academically.”

______________________________________________________

First-Year Faculty Book Award
Studio Coordinator:  Professor Jacob Gines
Recipient:  Sarah Hoing
This award is a book selected by the first-year faculty and is presented to a first-year student selected on the basis of ‘design excellence’.

______________________________________________________

Second-Year Faculty Book Award
Studio Coordinator:  Dr. Fred Esenwein
Recipient:  Meredith Hutto
This award is a book selected by the second-year faculty and is presented to a second-year student selected on the basis of ‘design excellence’.

______________________________________________________

Third-Year Faculty Book Award
Studio Coordinator:  Professor Emily McGlohn
Recipients:  Mitchell Hubbell and Asher Paxton
This award is a book selected by the third-year faculty and is presented to a third-year student/s selected on the basis of ‘design excellence’.

______________________________________________________

Fourth-Year Faculty Book Award
Studio Coordinator:  Professor Hans Herrmann
Recipient:  Zachary Henry and Austin Schnitzlein
This award is a book selected by the fourth-year faculty and is presented to a fourth- 
year student/s selected on the basis of ‘design excellence’.

____________________________________________________

ARCC King Award
Presented by:  Director Michael Berk
Recipient:  West Pierce
Selection for this award is made by the entire faculty.  Named in honor of the late Jonathan King, co-founder and first president of the Architectural Research Centers Consortium (ARCC), this award is presented to one student per ARCC-member school. Selection of the recipient is based upon criteria that acknowledge innovation, integrity, and scholarship in architectural and/or environmental design research.

______________________________________________________

Ryan Fierro

West Pierce

Fifth-Year Jurists’ Award
Presented by:  Jassen Callender, Jackson Center Director
Recipients:  Ryan Fierro and West Pierce
The Jurists’ Award, a book award, is conferred by the fifth-year design faculty upon the student(s) who has achieved the greatest personal growth as a designer and whose work has contributed to the overall success of the fifth-year Design Studio.

_____________________________________________________

Academic Achievement Award
Recipient:  Ria Bennett
The Academic Achievement Award is a book award presented to the graduating fifth-year student who has the highest cumulative MSU grade point average. 

______________________________________________________

Creative Windows & Doors/Marvin Windows Traveling Fellowship
($1,500) Ria Bennett
In September 2004, Dave Young and Eddie Rives, owners of Creative Windows & Doors; and David Morris, Marvin Windows representative, established this traveling fellowship for a student completing the fifth-year.

______________________________________________________

Alpha Rho Chi Medal
Presented by:  Director Michael Berk
Recipient:  Aryn Phillips
The Alpha Rho Chi Medal is awarded to the graduating fifth-year student who has shown an ability for leadership, performed willing service for the school, and gives promise of professional merit through attitude and personality. The medal is offered each year to every NAAB-fully accredited school of architecture. The recipient is chosen by the entire faculty of the school.

______________________________________________________

Certificate: Ria Bennett

Medal: Ryan Fierro

AIA Henry Adams Certificate and Medal
Presented by:  Director Michael Berk
Certificate Recipient:  Ria Bennett
Medal Recipient:  Ryan Fierro
Sponsored by the American Institute of Architects, the AIA Henry Adams Certificate and Medal are considered to be the most important awards given to graduating students. They are awarded for “general excellence in architecture” throughout the course of study. The medal is awarded to the most qualified student, and the certificate is awarded to the runner-up. Selection is made by the entire faculty.

______________________________________________________

Other Notable Student Awards, 2016-2017:

Mississippi State University Presidential Scholar
Krishna D. Desai
Krishna was one of thirteen students selected for Mississippi State’s most prestigious undergraduate scholarship. The annual award covers the current cost of university tuition, fees, books, and room and board, as well as research and study-abroad expenses. To qualify, applicants must have a minimum 30 ACT/1330 SAT score, as well as have graduated with a minimum core or overall 3.75 high school grade-point average. Selected from more than 700 qualified applicants, the 2016-17 group joins 37 others already participating in the program, which is part of MSU’s Judy and Bobby Shackouls Honors College. They are expected to maintain an overall 3.4 GPA while in their respective academic majors.

Aydelott Travel Award
Daniel Smith
A $2.4 million endowment – established by the late Alfred Lewis Aydelott, FAIA, and his wife, Hope Galloway Aydelott – provides a $20,000 award each year to four architecture students currently enrolled in the professional architecture degree programs at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; Auburn University; Mississippi State University; and the University of Tennessee. As MSU’s recipient, Daniel Smith will travel this summer to Sao Paulo, Brazil; Berlin, Germany; Firminy-Vert, France; and Dhaka, Bangladesh, to study four unique buildings. He will work next semester with his faculty advisor, Dr. Fred Esenwein.

Paul Grootkerk Travel Award
Emily Turner
The Paul Grootkerk Travel Award (funded by alumnus Ted T. Porter) is awarded to the second-place recipient of the Aydelott Travel Award. The award provides $4,000 for student travel. Emily will travel to Sao Paulo, Brazil; Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France; and Tokyo, Japan, this summer.

Briar and Michelle Jones Travel Fellowship
Zachary Henry
Alumnus Briar Jones and his wife, Michelle, provided $2,000 to support Zachary’s travel to research and interview architect Glenn Murcutt in Australia in July 2016. Zachary received the Best Undergraduate Paper Award from the 2017 Building Technology Educators Society International Conference, landing him a $500 travel scholarship, free conference admission, and BTES membership. He will present the paper, “Ecological Functionalism in the Work of Glenn Murcutt,” at the conference in Des Moines, Iowa, in June 2017. (Research was conducted under the guidance of Assistant Professor Emily McGlohn’s Audit Squad.)

Method Studio Undergraduate Research Fellow – Fall 2016
Omkar Prabhu
Omkar received a $3,000 stipend award and worked on research in the fall semester for Method Studio under the guidance of Assistant Professor Jacob Gines. Omkar was then invited (with honorarium funding) to present his research, “Launch Pads: A Generational Response to Urban Housing,” to the Sr. Leadership Team at Method Studio, Inc., in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Nov. 10, 2016. 

Association for Retired Faculty (ARF) William L. Giles Award
for Excellence in Architecture
Lara Lynn Waddell
This $500 award was established in 1997 in honor and memory of William Lincoln Giles, a charter member of ARF. It is given each year to a student selected by the School of Architecture on the basis of academic excellence and overall leadership within the school. Funding for the award comes from a contribution by Ms. Hazel Presson, aunt of Ginger Giles Jones, Dr. Giles’ daughter.

Poster – Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education
Anna Barr
Anna’s poster, titled “Learn & Grow – Educational and Community Garden,” was accepted to the AASHE Conference and Expo at the University of Arizona, Baltimore, Maryland, held Oct 10-11, 2016. Her work was created under the guidance of Associate Professor Alexis Gregory. Anna received $750 in matching funding from the MSU Shackouls Honors College to travel and present her poster.

Merit Award: 2016 American Society of Landscape Architects
Kirby Lockard and Carter Smith
The ASLA Mississippi Chapter received a merit award in the 2016 ASLA Student Award Program for the landscape design and installation at the MSU Golf Course Storm Shelter at Hole #4. The work was completed in a 2015 Maymester landscape architecture exterior design build class led by faculty instructor: P. Summerlin with architecture advisor Associate Professor Hans Herrmann.

Harrison Lecture
Lara Lynn Waddell
Lara Lynn was invited to present the February 2017 Harrison Lecture. Waddell presented her research resulting from travel funded by the 2016 Aydelott Travel Award. Her research was guided by her mentor,   Emeritus Professor Michael Fazio.

Office of Research and Economic Development 2017 Undergraduate Student Research Award
Cody Smith
Cody was recognized at ORED’s annual Research Awards Banquet on April 27, 2017.

______________________________________________________

2017-2018 Scholarships:

McCarty Architects Student Housing Team Architecture Scholarship
($2,500) Rashida Momoh, Damion Hardy
Candidates must be third, fourth, or fifth-year architecture students in good standing.

Eley Guild Hardy Architecture Annual Scholarship
($2,000) Omkar Prabhu
In May 2007, Taylor Guild III and David Hardy established this scholarship to assist talented students in their fifth-year of study in the architecture program.

Mockbee Hall & Drake Annual Scholarship
($1,350) Anna Barr
Applicants must be: entering the fifth-year design studio in the School of Architecture; have a minimum grade point average of 3.0; be of good moral character; and have demonstrated leadership ability.

Charles H. Dean, Jr. Annual Memorial Scholarship
($1,000) Donald Murray
Any full-time MSU students in their third- through fifth-year of design studio may apply. Applicants must be Mississippi residents and can demonstrate financial need.

Erin Remerow Parsons Loyalty Scholarship
($1,000/year) De’Vion Dingle, Danny Osman, Mattison Ping, Calvin Smith, Caley Watts
Open to incoming freshman and transfer students majoring in the College of Architecture, Art & Design with a minimum 3.0 GPA; transfer students must have a minimum of 48 transferable community college credit hours.

Lyndall Gail Wood Memorial Scholarship
($1,000) Austin Keaton
This scholarship was established by the Wood family to honor Lyndall Gail’s passion as an MSU architecture student. Applicants must be full-time students entering the fourth-year design studio in the School of Architecture, be in excellent academic standing with the university, and be a student with exceptional design ability.

Matt L. Virden III and M.L. Virden IV Memorial Scholarship
($1,000) Cory Moxley
Students must be entering their third-year; have a 2.80+ GPA; be of good moral character; have demonstrated leadership; can show financial need; and a resident of: Bolivar, Carroll, Coahoma, Desoto, Holmes, Humphreys, Issaquena, Leflore, Panola, Quitman, Sharkey, Sunflower, Tallahatchie, Tate, Tunica, Warren, Washington, or Yazoo Counties.

Stephanie Mihojevich Pizzetta Endowed Scholarship
($1,000) Maria Degtyareva, Hannah Hebinck, Rashidat Momoh, Yerix Morel
Candidates must be full-time students at Mississippi State University; have completed their second-year of design studio in the School of Architecture; have a minimum 3.0 GPA; and can demonstrate financial need.

Stephanie Mihojevich Pizzetta Annual Scholarship
($1,000) Jake Gartman
Candidates must be full-time students; have completed their second-year in the School of Architecture; have a minimum 3.0 GPA; and can demonstrate financial need.

Joseph L. Echols Scholars Program
($850) Patrick Greene, Rashida Momoh
($500) McKenzie Johnson
Candidates for the Joseph L. Echols Scholarship must: be a current undergraduate and underrepresented architecture student; show strong work ethic by maintaining a minimum 3.0 GPA; present a satisfactory work portfolio; demonstrate financial need.

Pryor & Morrow Annual Scholarship
($500) Diondria Bingham, Maria Degtyareva, Patrick Greene, Damion Hardy, Sarah Hoing, Austin Keaton,
              Donald Murray, Hannah Strider
Any full-time MSU students in their second- through fifth-year of design studio may apply. Students must be Mississippi residents and can demonstrate financial need.

Angelo “Pops” Primos Computer Scholarship
(software) Sarah Hoing, McKenzie Johnson, Hannah Strider
Applicants must be full-time MSU students entering the second-year design studio in the School of Architecture; and can demonstrate financial need.

Johnson-McAdams Design Discovery Scholarships
($600) To Be Determined  
Applicants must be from Leflore County, or be an under-represented minority group in architecture; and high school students interested in a career in architecture and related disciplines.

Joseph L. Echols D2 Scholarships (Design Discovery)
($600) To Be Determined  
Candidate must: be a high school student who shows an interest in majoring in architecture by taking college preparatory math and science courses and demonstrating ability; show strong work ethic and satisfactory performance; be a minority student from the Marshall County area; demonstrate financial need.

Photos from the event can be downloaded until July 30, 2017 here.

Download the program here.

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