Architecture students gain funding, experience during Student E-Week competition

April 15th, 2015 Comments Off

LEFT: Investing in Innovation Day keynote speaker Gary Butler said culture, the by-product of core values, is the key to a successful company. Chairman and CEO of Camgian Microsystems, Butler reminded student-entrepreneurs in the audience that "your company ultimately will become the manifestation of your core values." (Photo by Keats Haupt) RIGHT: Twenty-five MSU students representing 17 startup businesses received cash awards during the Office of Technology Management and Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center's 2015 Investing in Innovation Day. (Photo by Russ Houston)

LEFT: Investing in Innovation Day keynote speaker Gary Butler said culture, the by-product of core values, is the key to a successful company. Chairman and CEO of Camgian Microsystems, Butler reminded student-entrepreneurs in the audience that “your company ultimately will become the manifestation of your core values.” (Photo by Keats Haupt) RIGHT: Twenty-five MSU students representing 17 startup businesses received cash awards during the Office of Technology Management and Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center’s 2015 Investing in Innovation Day. (Photo by Russ Houston)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State

Twenty-five Mississippi State students are winners of the university’s fourth annual “Investing in Innovation,” or I-3 Day.

Organized by the university’s Office of Technology Management and Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center, the annual conference that also is part of Entrepreneurship Week hosted student business plan competitions, with cash awards totaling more than $39,000. Judged by 30 industry-respected leaders from companies all across the region, business model pitches were evaluated on company technology, management, financials, and market.

“We have so much positive momentum because of a great team we have at so many different levels that is committed to strive for excellence and innovation,” said MSU Vice President for Research and Economic Development David R. Shaw. “I am certainly proud of the innovation atmosphere and spirit that we’re continuing to encourage and see thrive here at Mississippi State University.”

MSU Vice President for Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Gregory Bohach also congratulated the innovators being recognized and expressed appreciation for the administrative support of deans, directors and department heads, as well as the offices of Research and Economic Development and Technology Management.

“Today is the culmination of many years of research, scholarly activity, and hard work. At Mississippi State, we do a really good job of translating our research and scholarly activities to benefit the citizens of Mississippi and the world. I really appreciate all that you all do and thank you for the teamwork that you display,” he said.

Gary Butler, chairman and CEO of Camgian Microsystems, was the event’s keynote speaker. Recently ranked in the 50 Most Promising Internet of Things Companies, Butler’s company was founded in 2006 with the vision of becoming a leader in combining innovative technologies in the areas of low-power microelectronics, sensors, wireless communications and data analysis to provide valuable decision analytics for customers in the government and commercial markets.

“What is the secret sauce to building a great company?” Butler first asked the entrepreneurial students in the audience.

While he agreed that “people,” “hustle,” “fix a problem,” “satisfy customers,” “patience,” “passion,” and “cash flow” all are important, Butler told the students that the key component is culture, which is the by-product of core values.

“If you’re starting a company today, the most important thing is that you establish those core values because culture is the unique thing that will make you different in the market,” he said. “Your company ultimately will become the manifestation of your core values.”

Butler discussed the three core values and resulting culture that he and his Camgian team implement every day.

“Our core values are based around three concepts: team, no quit, and playing to win. When we talk about team, we talk about it in the context of three components–having clear roles and responsibilities, clear goals and metrics, and most importantly, accountability,” said the University of Cambridge engineering doctoral graduate.

Having team members ask themselves whether they are “playing to win” drives a new degree of urgency and ambition around the Camgian organization, Butler said.

Butler, who also holds a Tulane University bachelor’s and Vanderbilt University master’s degree in mechanical engineering, reminded audience members that “success is ultimately built on failure.”

“What’s important is not that you fail. It’s what you learn from failure that’s important,” he emphasized when explaining the importance of having a “no quit” mentality. “When I first started the company, my focus really was around strategy and execution. What I quickly learned was that culture is the engine that drives performance of the organization, and you’ve got to get that right from the very beginning.”

2015 Entrepreneurship Week student winners from the startup competitions include:

ALEXANDRIA, Virginia–Kylie D. Hayes, a senior business administration major, first place, Conceptual (I) Startup Competition, as well as second place, Final Startup Competition, both for Kylight.

BLUE SPRINGS–Aleksander Sina, a junior chemical engineering/biomolecular engineering major, first place, Post-Revenue Startup competition, for Tortilleria San Felipe.

BRANDON–Jarred C. Creel, a junior architecture major, second place, Prototype (II) Startup Competition, for ArcFolio; and Taylor A. Lee, a senior business administration major, second place and People’s Choice Award, E-Commerce Competition, for StruggleBusBox.com.

BROOKHAVEN–John C. Mooney, a senior marketing major, first place, Student Elevator Pitch Competition, for Consumables.

COLLIERVILLE, Tennessee–Lisa N. Hankes, a senior communication/public relations major, Conceptual (I) Startup Competition People’s Choice Award, for Quill Club.

COLUMBUS–Thomas K. Fitzner, a senior marketing/international business and foreign language/French double-major, first place, E-Commerce Competition, for FestiFix.com; Andrew S. Smith, a sophomore business administration/international business and foreign language/Spanish double-major, People’s Choice Award, Prototype (II) Startup competition, for I Wish It Was Real; and Hagan D. Walker, a senior electrical engineering major, first place, Prototype (II) Startup Competition, as well as first place and People’s Choice Award, Final Startup Competition, all for Vibe.

CUMMING, Georgia–Emilee E. Arnold, a junior marketing major, second place and People’s Choice Award, E-Commerce Competition, for StruggleBusBox.com.

HATTIESBURG–Landon L. Dale, a junior business information systems major, Conceptual (I) Startup Competition People’s Choice Award, for Quill Club.

HOOVER, Alabama–Daniel S. Crist, a senior electrical engineering major, second place, Prototype (I) Startup Competition, for Akimbo Games.

JACKSON–Ankit S. “Keith” Kakadia, a senior marketing major, People’s Choice Award, Post-Revenue Startup Competition, for Advertees.

PASCAGOULA–Katherine L. “Kaylie” Mitchell, a fine arts/graphic design major, first place, Prototype (II) Startup Competition, first place and People’s Choice Award, Final Startup Competition, as well as People’s Choice Award, Student Elevator Pitch Competition, all for Vibe.

PETAL–Cody Smith, a senior electrical engineering major, second place, Prototype (I) Startup Competition, for Akimbo Games.

SAINT CHARLES, Missouri–Curtis M. Reed, a junior architecture major, second place, Prototype (II) Startup Competition, for ArcFolio.

SOUTHAVEN–Julie N. Burke, a junior business administration major, second place and People’s Choice Award, E-Commerce Competition, for StruggleBusBox.com.

STARKVILLE– Ben Bailey, a senior management/international business and foreign language/Spanish double-major, first place, Conceptual (II) Startup competition, for Shot Swap; William C. Sanders, a kinesiology/sports administration master’s student, first place and a People’s Choice Award, Prototype (I) Startup Competition, for Xchange Group of MS; Andrew S. Stamps, a computer science doctoral student, second-place, Conceptual (I) Startup Competition, for 2D Knights; and Trey P. Wallace, a freshman computer engineering major, first place, Conceptual (II) Startup competition, for Shot Swap.

TOWN CREEK, Alabama–Claire Wilson, a senior communication/public relations major, second place and People’s Choice Award, E-Commerce Competition, for StruggleBusBox.com.

VARDAMAN–Alejandro Gracia, a senior business administration/international business and foreign language/Spanish double-major, first place, Post-Revenue Startup competition, for Tortilleria San Felipe.

VICKSBURG–Matt Waddle, a junior mechanical engineering major, second place and a People’s Choice Award, Conceptual (II) Startup competition, for Glassio; second place, Student Elevator Pitch Competition, for Squares.

WOODSTOCK, Georgia–Justin J. Stanfill, a junior management major, second place, Post-Revenue Startup competition, for Stanny’s Tackle Co.

MSU Entrepreneurship Week 2015 and I-3 Day was made possible by Tellus Operating Group, LLC; Talos Energy, LLC; MSU alumnus Mark Dumas; Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell and Berkowitz, PC; and MSU’s Thad Cochran Endowment for Entrepreneurship, College of Business, and James Worth Bagley College of Engineering.

For more “Entrepreneurship Week” or “I-3 Day” information, contact Eric Hill, program manager for the university’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, at 662-325-3521 or ehill@ecenter.msstate.edu.

The center is a university-wide resource committed to creating a culture of entrepreneurial activity, providing means to support business start-ups with awards, providing business planning and mentoring with MSU partners, creating an alumni network of entrepreneurs, and partnering with private businesses to expand opportunities.

Learn more about the E-Center at ecenter.msstate.edu, facebook.com/msstateecenter, twitter.com/MSStateECenter, and instagram.com/msstateecenter; the Office of Technology Management at iptl.msstate.edu.

 

Read the story at WCBI.

CAAD research center provides fresh prospective at state conference

April 13th, 2015 Comments Off

Johnson

Johnson

Kelsey Johnson, planner with MSU’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio, was asked to present at the 2015 Mississippi Water Resources Conference in Jackson on April 7.

The Design Studio – one of two research centers in the College of Architecture, Art and Design – was able to bring a fresh perspective to the conference, which has a heavy science focus.

Johnson presented on the significant role of education and outreach during the development of a watershed implementation plan.  Since the end of 2013, the Design Studio has been facilitating the development of a watershed implementation plan for Rotten Bayou Watershed in Hancock and Harrison Counties.

The presentation was titled “Improving Water Quality through Watershed Planning, Design & Innovative Outreach Activities.”  Strategies presented included working with nontraditional partners such as a churches, libraries, golf courses and an educational puppet show; utilizing social media and raffles to make participation appealing and accessible; and leveraging funding from NOAA’s Gulf of Mexico B-WET Program to connect students at a local elementary school to the watershed planning work.

Grants help ‘Audit Squad’ get started

April 10th, 2015 Comments Off

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of a 20K House at Auburn University's Rural Studio. They also demonstrated how to use the equipment.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of a 20K House at Auburn University’s Rural Studio. They also demonstrated how to use the equipment.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Emily McGlohn has been experimenting with ways to introduce one of her research interests, the relationship between energy efficiency and the quality of construction, into the MSU’s School of Architecture curriculum while helping out the state at the same time.

“Building performance is easily tested with building diagnostic tools such as a blower door and thermal imaging camera,” said McGlohn.

So, the assistant professor used funds from her 2014 Schillig Grant, which she received for teaching excellence, to purchase the necessary testing equipment, and she secured a $500 Center for the Advancement of Service Learning Excellence (CASLE) mini grant to support travel.

McGlohn started an independent study course and recruited students interested in the topic. “The Audit Squad,” as she has dubbed the group, has been working this year to collect and analyze data.

In the fall, the Audit Squad – which includes Ria Bennet, third-year architecture major; Cody Smith, fourth-year architecture major; and Bill Plot, fourth-year building construction science major – traveled to Greenwood to test air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood.

“The best way to understand how a building performs is to actually test it with tools,” said McGlohn, who explained that the lower the air infiltration rate, the better the envelope. “A high air infiltration rate signifies a leaky building.”

The group also paid a visit to the Auburn University’s Rural Studio to perform tests on some of their projects. While at the Rural Studio, McGlohn presented a lecture on air infiltration, and her Audit Squad shared what they had learned.

“The students loved it,” she said. “It was a lot of fun.”

After analyzing their results, the squad began working on their own independent research project, which they have submitted to the upcoming MSU Undergraduate Research Symposium. They used the newly purchased tools to test the air infiltration rates of a variety of student rental properties built in Starkville over the last 40 years to see if age has anything to do with the rates.

This summer, the research will continue in Greenwood.

Teaming up with the College of Architecture, Art and Design’s Enterprise Rose Fellow, Emily Roush Elliott, the Audit Squad will test the air infiltration rates of a variety of low-income housing in the Greenwood area to compare the typical rental property with more modern low-incoming housing.

The data will be analyzed next fall to try to quantify the monetary and health burdens that can come from leaky, low-income housing. The findings and suggestions for improvement will be shared in a brochure for distribution to nonprofit organizations that could benefit from the data.

“The overall main goal,” said McGlohn, “is to create a baseline metric of energy efficiency rates for low-income housing in the Mississippi Delta.”

School of Architecture announces final 2015 jury schedule

April 9th, 2015 Comments Off

collaborative studio reviews 04302014_31

All reviews will occur in the Giles Gallery or Michael Fazio Jury Room in Giles Hall, Starkville.

Fri., April 24, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
First-Year Studio
Coordinator: Assistant Professor Andrew Tripp
The first-year studio will be presenting final proposals for a stargazer’s retreat.  The content of the studio is focused on the fundamental topics of orientation, order, proportion and the elemental language of architectural form.

Mon., April 27, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Second-Year Studio
Coordinator: Assistant Professor Justin Taylor
The second-year studio will be presenting their Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge research station. The studio is focused on interventions into the landscape, utilizing pre-existing site structures.

Tues., April 28, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Third-Year: Collaborative Studio
Coordinator: Assistant Professor Tom Leathem
The third-year spring Collaborative Studio is a partnership between the School of Architecture and the Building Construction Science Program. The students are combined into teams of three to four students with at least one student from each department in each team. The student teams are designing a new fire station in Starkville for the Starkville Fire Department. The students have been working with their faculty, professional architects and professional constructors to develop the project.

Wed., April 29, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Fourth-Year Studio
Coordinator: Associate Professor Hans Herrmann
The fourth-year design studio is developing proposals for a New Library in the city of Copenhagen, Denmark. This studio is the demonstration point for Integrative/Comprehensive Design. Students will present projects inclusive of Visioning, Programming, Site Design, Structural, Active and Passive Systems with a special focus on Water Ecology. The libraries will be approx. 12,000 sq.ft. in size with an additional exterior theater space accommodating up to 200 viewers. Click here to see the full description of the project.

Thurs., April 30, 10-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Fri., May 1, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Fifth-Year Studio
Coordinator: Jackson Center Director Jassen Callender
Independent thesis projects

NOTE: All times are subject to a bit of change (due to the nature of the review process) along with breaks for lunch. Please contact the school to confirm the final schedule as it relates to weather or other unforeseen circumstances.

CAAD to hold alumni reunion in Atlanta

April 6th, 2015 Comments Off

2015 reunion card

The Mississippi State University College of Architecture, Art, and Design will host an alumni reunion and reception on May 14, 2015, in Atlanta, Ga.

Held at the Atlanta Marriot Marquis hotel and coinciding with the 2015 AIA Convention, this informal gathering will be a time for CAAD alumni, friends and family to re-connect, visit and network as well as get updates on what is currently happening within the college.

Other university receptions will be held at the same time in this location, so we expect to be able to network with many additional visitors from the AIA and other professional organizations.

——

Who: CAAD Alumni, friends and family; peers in the industry

What: A time to catch up with your classmates, re-connect, and network with friends.

When: Thursday, May 14, 2015, 6-8 p.m.

Where: Atlanta Marriot Marquis
Room A703
(located on the Atrium level/accessible from the guestroom elevators as floor “AL”)
265 Peachtree Center Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30303
(404) 521-0000

RSVP: https://caadatmsu.wordpress.com/alumni-rsvp/

———-

Contact Christie McNeal at 662-325-9839 or cmcneal@caad.msstate.edu with questions.

Click here to download the invitation.

CAAD research center director to present at Pecha Kucha Biloxi

March 30th, 2015 Comments Off

perkes

David Perkes, AIA, will present as part of the first spring Pecha Kucha Biloxi event.

This year’s theme is based on MAPPartner, the Ohr Museum’s ongoing Katrina+10 series of exhibits and events. 

On April 2, from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Ohr O’Keefe Museum of Art, coast architects will discuss how Katrina impacted the local architecture and showcase their successful efforts to restore it.

“How Katrina Changed Our Look” presenters include:

·         Holly Gibbs – Hands on Mississippi
·         Kevin O’Brien – Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
·         Sonja Gillis – Lyn Meadows Discovery Center
·         Steve Phillips – WLOX
·         John Anderson, AIA – unabridged Architecture
·         Corey Christy – Walter Anderson Museum
·         Dr. Janice Johnson – Biloxi Public Schools
·         Allison Anderson, FAIA – unabridged Architecture
·         Windy Swetman – Swetman Security
·         Christene Brice – Harrison County Election Commission District 4
·         David Perkes, AIA – Gulf Coast Community Design Studio
·         Romy Simpson – Negrotto’s Gallery

For more information about the presenters, check out Pecha Kucha Biloxis’ Facebook page.

Also, MAPPartner Marvin Windows and Doors is excited to announce the return of the prestigious Marvin Architects Challenge celebrating acclaimed design and breathtaking architecture. This challenge gives architects the chance to submit their best work that displays architectural creativity and features Marvin Windows and Doors and see how they measure up against their peers.  It’s a yearly chance to show off their most award-worthy project and get the attention they deserve. This year, there are new judging categories as well as an extended award structure, which gives even more opportunities for recognition.

For more information on the program, please visit Marvin Architects Challenge 2015.

PechaKucha Night was devised in Tokyo in February 2003 as an event for young designers to meet, network and show their work in public. It has turned into a massive celebration, with events happening in hundreds of cities around the world.

Student-designed, built shelters now open at MSU Golf Course

March 27th, 2015 Comments Off

Golf_Course-shelters-ribboncut_20150323_M4B4124_1

Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State

Golf_Course-shelters-ribboncut_20150323_M4B4179

Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State

By Leah Barbour | Mississippi State University

Local golf enthusiasts joined Mississippi State University administrators, faculty, staff and students this week for the unveiling of two on-course shelters at the MSU Golf Course.

The new structures at the fourth and 10th holes, complete with men’s and women’s accommodations and cart parking spaces on each side, were designed by second-year architecture majors and built by second-year building construction science students.

Both the School of Architecture and the building construction science academic program are part of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design.

The work was completed during the fall semester collaborative studio, coordinated by associate professor Hans Herrmann and assistant professor Emily McGlohn of the architecture school, along with assistant professor Tom Leathem and lecturer Lee Carson of building construction science.

“Thank you for your active involvement, for the collective leadership from all our faculty and for everyone involved in this,” said MSU President Mark E. Keenum at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. “This is an opportunity to really showcase what Mississippi State talent is about. What a great new addition this is, not only to this golf course, but to our professional golf management program.”

The PGM program, housed in the College of Business, is the second oldest sanctioned by the Professional Golfers’ Association of America. Students completing the four-and-a-half-year curriculum receive a bachelor’s degree in marketing and 16 months of practical work experience.

Michael Berk, architecture school director, said MSU is the only institution of higher learning in the country to require all second-year architecture and building construction science students to complete a full year of collaborative studio.

“There’s no other school in the nation to require two full semesters of working together,” agreed Jim West, dean of the College of Architecture, Art and Design. “Our students have the opportunity to do truly collaborative work, and we’re always interested in having these types of projects for the community and our students and faculty.”

Though building construction science and architecture students have completed their portion of the project, MSU Department of Landscape Architecture students will continue by improving the landscaping around the buildings, said Craig Capano, director of the building construction science program.

“This is only the first of many projects that I hope we can all do together,” he said. “We’ve already started discussions about next fall, and the faculty have some great ideas. And that’s what Mississippi State is all about–it’s about learning; it’s about changing; it’s about improving.”

Sharon Oswald, College of Business dean, emphasized the on-course shelters also benefit PGM students.

“I want to thank the faculty, and particularly the students, on behalf of the PGM program and the MSU Golf Course,” Oswald said. “We love collaborative projects, and anything we can ever do to help, we will.”

The 6,390-yard, par-72 course, located three miles east of campus at 1520 Old Highway 82, opened to the public in 1986. Along with the two on-course shelters, cart path and driving range, the course features a 5,000-square-foot clubhouse with men’s and women’s locker rooms, a snack bar, and a fully stocked golf shop and classroom.

School, ICAA host Dan and Gemma Camp Workshop in Classical Design

March 25th, 2015 Comments Off

DanCampworkshop03202015_2
The Institute of Classical Architecture and Art (ICAA) in conjunction with the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University recently hosted the Dan and Gemma Camp Workshop in Classical Design.

The two-day workshop included a series of presentations from ICAA representatives teaching classical design, a tour of Starkville’s Cotton District by its founder and developer Dan Camp, a reception sponsored by Duncan-Williams Inc. Investment Bankers, and a drawing session.

The program was made possible by an endowed gift from Dan and Gemma Camp as well as generous gifts from Briar and Michelle Jones and Duncan-Williams Inc. Investment Bankers.

Friday Workshop:

Cotton District Tour:

Friday Reception:

School of Architecture, ICAA to host classical architecture workshop

February 24th, 2015 Comments Off

Poster Design: Jeanz Holt | ICAA

Poster Design: Jeanz Holt | ICAA

The Institute of Classical Architecture and Art (ICAA) in conjunction with the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University is pleased to announce the Dan and Gemma Camp Workshop in Classical Architectural Design. The program is made possible by an endowed gift from founder and developer of Starkville’s Cotton District development Dan and Gemma Camp as well as generous gifts from Briar and Michelle Jones and Duncan-Williams Inc. Investment Bankers.

Participation in this FREE workshop will provide 6 CEUs:
• Friday afternoon: 2 regular LUs and 2 HSW LUs (Register here)
• Saturday: 2 LUs (Register here)

Open to friends of the School of Architecture, builders, practicing architects and MSU students, this workshop will provide an introduction to the practice of classical architectural design.

A series of presentations beginning early in the afternoon of Friday, March 20 and continuing through March 21 (see schedule below), will be held in Starkville, MS, at the School of Architecture and will introduce the language and principles of classical architectural design and traditional urbanism and its practice today. The day will conclude with a guided tour of Starkville’s historic Cotton District and a dinner reception at MSU’s Hunter Henry Center.

On Saturday, participants will have an opportunity to explore in greater depth the language of classical design through drawing and examine examples of classical design on the campus of Mississippi State.

The program will be presented by practitioners and educators active in the field of classical design.

——————————–
Schedule

Events will be held in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium in Giles Hall – 899 Collegeview Street, Mississippi State, MS 39762 – unless otherwise noted.

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (2 regular LUs and 2 HSW LUs)
1:00 – 1:15 pm           Welcome and Introduction – Michael Berk + ICAA
1:15 – 2:00                  A Classical Primer – ICAA
2:00 – 2:45                 Elements of Classical Architecture – ICAA
Break
3:00 – 3:45                 The Practice and Craft of Classical Architectural Design – ICAA
3:45 – 4:30                 Making Places: Buildings and Public Spaces– ICAA
4:30 – 6:30                 Tour of the Cotton District – Michael Fazio, Dan Camp, ICAA Members
6:30  – until                Dinner and Reception at the Hunter Henry Center, MSU Campus

Click here to register for Friday. 

(Remember, the event is FREE, but you must register. Please bring a sketch pad to this session. Minimum size: 8.5 x 11″).

——————————–
SATURDAY, March 21, 2015 (2 LUs)
10 am – noon                Introduction to Classical Elements
Field Study and Drawing – Classical Architecture on the MSU campus

Click here to register for Saturday. 

(Remember, the event is FREE, but you must register. Please bring a sketch pad to this session. Minimum size: 8.5 x 11″).

Download the poster.

 

Materials class visits Columbus Brick

February 23rd, 2015 Comments Off

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A group of 40 students in Assistant Professor Jacob Gines’ materials class recently visited Columbus Brick Company in Columbus.

A special thanks to Butch Reed, sales manager, who coordinated a tour of the plant’s entire operation for the group, which included a look at the raw materials as well as explanations of the processes of mixtures and molding, how the bricks are manufactured and the firing process.

This is the third year Gines has taken his class on a trip to Columbus Brick.

“It’s so wonderful the way they interact with the students,” he said. “For them to see the manual and then the mechanized part is pretty incredible.”

He said the highlight of this trip was at the end of the tour when students were able to work alongside four experienced brick masons who were invited to conduct a workshop and demonstration.

Students were challenged to build a temporary brick wall.

“Parts of it were not that great,” laughed Gines. “But that’s to be expected.”

Gines said he was especially glad his students were able to see the pride the masons take in their craft.

“What a wonderful opportunity to get some hands-on experience and to understand and appreciate the work of masons and that it’s extremely skilled work and not something everyone can do.”

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