MSU student architecture exhibit featured in Jackson

August 11th, 2015 Comments Off on MSU student architecture exhibit featured in Jackson

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via David Lewis

Via msstate.edu

A photography exhibit by four Mississippi State students highlighting the state’s distinctive modern architecture is being featured through Nov. 15 at the Old Capitol Museum in Jackson.

Displayed in the historic downtown building’s main hall, the images captured by current and just-graduated university architecture majors pay homage to a wealth of modern structures, some of which are in disrepair and danger of being demolished.

“The diversity of projects and range of work is the most fascinating part of the exhibit,” said May School of Architecture graduate David Lewis of Jackson. “From schools to homes, from Durant to Jackson, the exhibit expresses the breadth of the modern footprint in Mississippi.”

Along with Lewis, the exhibit represents the efforts of seniors Mary K. Sanders of Indian Springs, Ala., and Casey A. Walker of Brandon, along with Landon G. Kennedy of Clinton, a May cume laude School of Architecture graduate.

All are current or former members of the campus chapter of Tau Sigma Delta national honor society.

Assistant professor Jacob Gines provided guidance and also photographed one of the buildings for the project that debuted last year at MSU’s Giles Hall, home of the school and College of Architecture, Art and Design.

The exhibit then traveled to Greenwood before being on special display in Ocean Springs at the Sullivan-Wright/Charnley-Norwood home. The latter location represented a collaboration with the Mississippi Heritage Trust’s “Mississippi MAD MOD” website and celebration.

The trust and Mississippi Department of Archives and History are assisting with the exhibit.

“It was a privilege for our office to be able to provide seed funding for this entrepreneurial effort two years ago,” said Michael A. Berk, the school’s director and F. L. Crane Professor.

Observing that the exhibit “has truly taken on a life of its own,” Berk expressed hope that it “will continue to make the rounds in our state with future aspirations of a national exhibition down the road.”

Gines said both Lewis and Kennedy were instrumental in getting the exhibit into the Old Capitol Museum.

“With the exhibit being in my hometown of Jackson, it is very surreal to see my work up and having my friends and family go see the exhibit,” said Lewis. “It’s great to continue the conversation and education with folks from home.”

“The greatest satisfaction came by opening the eyes of other Mississippians about the importance of this modern movement within their own state,” added Kennedy. “Some people knew where some of these buildings were, but a lot did not, which was neat because it would often solicit a response of ‘oh I didn’t know that was in Mississippi.'”

To view the exhibit, visit www.facebook.com/pages/Old-Capitol -Museum/124269894286616.

Question and Answer with graduates David Lewis and Landon Kennedy

What is your favorite part of the exhibit?
LK: My favorite part of the exhibit was getting to collaborate with, not only the school and the resources that the faculty brings, but also the ability to see a project emerge from something in the Giles gallery to traveling around the state. It’s a big deal to see projects, and in this case an exhibit, be appreciated outside of Giles.  It really encourages current and future students in the School of Architecture to use the knowledge already gained in classes and apply them to work that can be appreciated outside of school.

What was a challenge you faced in putting together the exhibit?
DL:The layout of the exhibit. Landon and I spent a lot of time evaluating and redesigning the layout of the photos. It was something that was modular in design, in order to adjust to each space it would be housed in. In a way, the layout reflects principles of modern architecture design.
LK: A challenge faced in putting the exhibit together was a sacrifice of time.  Obviously, we did this project in our spare time (which is quite difficult to come by as an architecture major).  But it was enjoyable spending the extra hours in studio assembling the pieces or printing images because we knew the work would be realized, whether in the Charley Norwood House or in the Old Capitol Museum.

How MSU/the School of Architecture prepared you to curate this exhibit?
DL: MSU School of Architecture has helped us tremendously with this exhibit. First, they encouraged and enabled us to put together the exhibit. Then, they have continued to provide resources to make this exhibit continue to this day.
LK: The School of Architecture has prepared us to curate the exhibit by giving us the resources to find the information we needed and place the exhibit where it should go. The school also has taught me to put forth thought and time into a project to develop it into something that surprises you in the end.  This exhibit has done just that.

Read the story in the Clarion Ledger about the event.

See the story in the Starkville Daily News.

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