Carl Small Town Center’s Tanglefoot Trail project featured on WCBI

November 20th, 2014 Comments Off

http://caad.msstate.edu/wpmu/sarcnews/cstc-tanglefoot-wcbi/

Via WCBI

They gathered at the Tanglefoot Trailhead in Houston, near what is left of the old depot. A mix of community leaders, economic development officials and specialists in rural design, to talk about how the trail can serve the community.

“The hard work is done, the trail is here, it’s great, people are using it, but now we kind of look at, ok, how do we make this even better?” said Cynthia Nikitin, who is with the Citizens Institute on Rural Design, which picked Houston as one of four towns nationwide to help develop a plan to maximize public spaces.

There are many possibilities for development along Houston’s portion of the 44-mile-long Tanglefoot Trail which runs from New Albany south through Pontotoc into Chickasaw County. Options including recreation facilities, public spaces or other community amenities.

One of the main goals is to get visitors from the trailhead to the downtown area. A workshop set for early next year will look at ways to do just that.

MSU students from the Carl Small Town Center will help organize the workshop and will help implement ideas.

“It’s a really wonderful opportunity for them, it’s a real world project that they get to be involved in, they get to see first hand how to interact with community members and produce great results,” said Leah Kemp from the Carl Small Town Center.

Economic development officials say having a plan to draw more people to the trail and the community will benefit everyone.

“We want to develop further businesses, we want to develop the landscapes, so people are attracted into this community, it has much much potential,” said John Walden, chairman of the Chickasaw Development Foundation.

Once plans are finalized, experts will look at options to pay for the projects.

The workshop to gather ideas for development along the Tanglefoot Trail in Houston is set for mid February.

NOMAS, Fashion Board hold Trashion Show 2014

November 20th, 2014 Comments Off

Trashion 2014 [HD] (by Assistant Professor Justin Taylor)

The sixth annual NOMAS Trashion Show was held on Nov. 12 at 7 p.m. in Giles Hall.

Put on by the School of Architecture, the National Organization of Minority Architecture Students and the MSU Fashion Board, this year’s “High Trashion-” themed show featured designs created by students using recycled materials.

Junk to Funk Sale:

Setting up for the Trashion Show:

Architecture, building construction science students establish a national model for academic collaboration

November 18th, 2014 Comments Off

Mississippi State University President Mark Keenum, Provost and Executive Vice President Jerry Gilbert and Interim Vice President for Student Affairs Bill Broyles visit the Collaborative Studio in Giles Hall to view models and full-scale mock-ups of the golf course facilities being designed and built by architecture and building construction science students. Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University President Mark Keenum, Provost and Executive Vice President Jerry Gilbert and Interim Vice President for Student Affairs Bill Broyles visit the Collaborative Studio in Giles Hall to view models and full-scale mock-ups of the golf course facilities being designed and built by architecture and building construction science students. Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art and Design is paving the way nationally when it comes to collaboration between the fields of construction and architecture.

In the fall, CAAD’s second-year architecture and building construction science studios come together to form a joint Collaborative Studio, where students are challenged to bring knowledge from their two disciplines together.

Assistant Professor of architecture Emily McGlohn, coordinator for the studio, explained that buildings are becoming more and more complex and require construction and architecture professionals to work together – what is referred to in the industry as Integrated Project Delivery (IPD).

“The students are learning the earlier the constructors and architects come together in the design process, the better the building will be and the less headaches they will encounter along the way.”

Each year, students in this studio are challenged to work together to design and construct a full-scale product from start to finish for a real client. Last year’s fall Collaborative Studio constructed two bus shelters for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. This year, students are working on two lighting shelters for the MSU Golf Course.

“Every class gets a chance to do a project like this,” said Associate Professor of architecture Hans Herrmann. “That’s rare,” he said, going on to explain how important hands-on learning is for students. “The reality of making is different from drawing. Gravity becomes a reality for them,” he laughed.

And the students have, in fact, dealt with their fair share of challenges, both with learning how to work together and actually building something they have designed.

“This is a pretty intense, hands-on learning experience for them,” said building construction science instructor Lee Carson, who said that students are learning “the idea of drawing with materials.”

This year’s project includes two separate shelters with restrooms for the golf course – one with cypress wall panels as an exterior skin and the other with a concrete skin. Both facilities will have cisterns to capture rainwater that will be used to flush the toilets.

After working on individual, small-scale designs, the 49 students split into four teams to tackle designing and building the two facilities in pieces – a wood wall panel team, a concrete wall panel team, a roof truss team and a concrete wall cistern team. This teamwork has allowed for a peer-review atmosphere, which has resulted in improved quality of design and construction.

“The students’ work has continued to impress us,” said Bill Broyles, interim vice for student affairs, who has been consulting with the group from the start.

Construction began on site with the pouring of the foundation in late September. Students are currently working on the formwork for the cistern wall while the other teams are fabricating their components off site. Construction on both buildings is set to be finished by the end of the month.

The project will wrap up with a final review on Dec. 1, where students will explain the design and construction process. A ribbon cutting ceremony and reception – open to the MSU community – will be held on the golf course in the spring.

“The students are really excited to have an investment on campus,” said Herrmann. “And we are grateful to have a project to work on,” added Michael Berk, F.L. Crane Professor and director of the School of Architecture.

According to Jim West, the college’s dean, CAAD is the only college in the country where the entire group of construction and architecture students from one year-level come together in a joint studio.

“MSU is truly reframing innovative architecture and construction education,” said the new director of the Building Construction Science Program Craig Capano, Ph.D., and Roy Anderson Professor.

“For our students, the idea of IPD and project collaboration is going to be a familiar concept,” added Berk.

“And we are setting a standard we feel will be modeled in the years to come across the country,” finished West.

Salinas presents final Harrison Lecture for fall

November 18th, 2014 Comments Off

salinas lecture 11142014_8

Gerardo Salinas presented the final Harrison Lecture for the fall semester on Fri., Nov. 14 at 4 p.m. in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium in Giles Hall.

Salinas works for Rojkind Arquitectos, a Mexico City-based architecture firm whose work spans across a diverse and global platform. Salinas is engaged in implementing and expanding the firm’s mission of designing highly experiential, civic-minded spaces and works to discover new methods and opportunities to expand architectural practice.

View the full schedule.

The Harrison Lecture Series is presented by the School of Architecture and is made possible by a generous gift from Dr. and Mrs. Robert V.M. Harrison, FAIA, FCSI.

School of Architecture alumna featured in MS Business Journal

November 13th, 2014 Comments Off

Ann Somers helps review 4th-year students' projects after the March 2013 Advisory Council Meeting.

Ann Somers helps review 4th-year students’ projects after the March 2013 Advisory Council Meeting.

Ann Somers, a member of the School of Architecture Advisory Council and a 1981 alumna, was recently featured in the Mississippi Business Journal.

MAKING JACKSON A BETTER PLACE
Ann Somers enjoys her career because of variety of projects and the people she meets
by Lynn Lofton

While growing up in Byram, Ann Somers loved putting thing together, such as puzzles, model cars and ships and fantasy Barbie kingdoms. That interest in building things led to a career in architecture, something she learned about as an eighth-grader.

“I knew that was what I wanted to do,” Somers recalls. “Up to that point I did not like school and was an average student. Once I understood I needed to have a good grade point average to get into architecture school, I stepped it up and became a good student. The other thought with architecture was that I could branch into interior design or site design with an architecture degree.”

All of her first 12 years of school were spent in Byram where she graduated with around 30 class members; some were together all 12 years. She grew up in a rural home with plenty of pets and animals. Her grandparents lived next door, and Somers played outside all the time. “There were very few kids my age around so I entertained myself,” she said.

She remembers her father, who died when she was 10 years of age, as fun to be with and involving her in whatever he was doing, which was mainly farming and selling vegetables to local stores and restaurants. “My mother was a registered nurse who taught nursing most of her career and ended her career teaching hospital staff how to teach patients about their medical issues, so they could stay well,” Somers said. “She was very early in the wellness movement, a great role model for me and extremely supportive.”

After graduation from the Mississippi State University School of Architecture, Somers, 56, spent time working in New York City and Savannah, Ga.; experiences she feels gave her a good background for returning to her home state to work in her profession. In 2003 she was chosen the Alumna of the Year for the MSU School of Architecture.

Now a partner in the Jackson firm of Cooke Douglass Farr Lemons, Somers enjoys the continual learning of being an architect. “It is never boring. Every project type has a learning curve, and building materials and systems are ever changing,” she says. “Plus there are new people you get to know with each new project.”

Although Somers has worked on many high-profile projects, she has difficulty choosing one single project of which she’s the most proud. “That’s a hard question because I love all our buildings. They’re a little like children I birthed into the world. But to pick just one building, it would be the Mississippi Department of Archives and History building.”

As a dream project, Somers is currently thinking a lot about what makes the perfect retirement living situation. “I would love to design a retirement village where you can age gracefully and happily  in place,” she said.

As a long time member of the Sierra Club, Somers is vitally interested in architecture that’s environmentally friendly and sees some changes coming to Mississippi in that regard. “Mississippi is getting better and it’s partially due to a national movement started through USGBC (United States Green Building Council) LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) to work toward sustainability and create healthier environments,” she said. “The USGBC website is a great resource for project owners to see what is possible. As owners are educated and excited by what is possible in building, greater changes will be made. In the meantime, architects, engineers and contractors are making a difference through smart design, efficient systems design and construction waste reduction.”

When not working, Somers volunteers with Community Animal Rescue and Adoption, which she also serves as a board member, and Rankin County Animal Adoption foundation. “Metro Jackson has a terrible problem with unwanted pets,” she said. “The local government is euthanizing about 15,000 pets annually, which is 288 per week. We do not have a culture of spaying and neutering our pets, so along with adoption promotion, I am involved with spay and neuter public education.”

She and husband Jim Somers, a landscape architect who recently retired, live in Jackson and have four dogs and a cat — “all of which are beautiful, sweet and perfect.” The couple is committed to making Jackson a great place to live. “We help by promoting and participating in music, art, and community events,” she said.

NOMAS Trashion Show featured on WCBI

November 13th, 2014 Comments Off

See the story at WCBI.com.

CAAD welcomes new associate dean

November 12th, 2014 Comments Off

Hall_Gregory_M4B9788~ggh43Greg G. Hall, Ph.D., AIA, NCARB, has joined Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art, and Design as the associate dean.

Hall comes to MSU from the Savannah College of Art and Design, where he has served as chair of the architecture department since 2012 and was a professor from 2004-2007.  He was also the director of education for the National Council for Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) in Washington, D.C., from 2007-2012.

“We are always very excited to have someone of Greg Hall’s caliber join the college, said Dean Jim West. “His global perspective and broad design and construction experience will play an important role in advancing all of the programs in the college.”

In his new role, Hall will focus on scholarship and research efforts – supporting faculty, departments and the college’s two research centers – in addition to other administrative roles.

“I’m looking forward to getting to know the faculty, staff and students and finding out what their interests are and how I can support their efforts and work,” said Hall.

The college’s many unique disciplines – architecture, art, interior design and building construction science – and collaborative work are part of what brought Hall to MSU.

“It’s such a rich – and appropriate – mix of disciplines that you don’t find in many other colleges,” he said.

There are numerous cross-college collaborative projects happening each semester within CAAD. Most recently, all four units came together for the annual Brasfield & Gorrie Student Design Competition, in which students were tasked to work together on various aspects of designing a hypothetical building.

CAAD also boasts a unique, one-of-a-kind collaborative studio that brings together architecture and building construction science students and professors for an entire year of study.

“What’s happening here at MSU is so exciting and valuable to students’ preparation for careers,” he said. “Employers are seeking out graduates who have had the kind of exposure and collaborative experience across disciplines that we are providing early in students’ education.”

“We have an unrelenting mission to be an innovative force in providing opportunities and advanced preparation of students assuming leadership roles in companies and organizations that are positively impacting the built and visual environments,” said West. “Professor Hall will play a vital part in CAAD fulfilling this critical mission.”

Hall also knows the importance of exposing students to other cultures, and he brings extensive international experience to the college. In addition to the U.S., he has lived in and worked on architecture and building construction projects in Africa, Japan, Hong Kong, France, Italy and the United Kingdom. He has also worked with two Pritzker Prize architects, Jean Nouvel and Renzo Piano; one of the six largest Japanese contractors, Takenaka Corporation; and the U.S. Department of State.

“The experience of living and working in these environments really made a difference for me in my career, and it’s even more important for students today,” he said. “Regardless of a student’s geographic location, future opportunities are global, and they will be working with people from different cultures and from around the world.”

Hall also has an interest in the role the university plays in the culture of Mississippi’s rich resource of towns and rural centers.

“I’ve always heard Mississippi State and Starkville have a very special academic environment – close, tight-knit, supportive, collaborative and cross-disciplinary, – and I have found that to be true,” he said, adding that he looks forward to further exploring this environment as well as the role played by research centers, such as the college’s Carl Small Town Center, in supporting the growth and sustainability of Mississippi’s unique urban environment.

Hall holds a bachelor of architecture from the University of Texas at Austin and a doctor of philosophy in architecture from the University of Hong Kong, where he was also a Fulbright Fellow.  He is registered as an architect in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina and holds an NCARB certificate, which facilitates reciprocal registration.

Read the story on MSU’s website.

Gerardo Salinas to present Harrison Lecture on Nov. 14

November 11th, 2014 Comments Off

Architect Gerardo Salinas will present a lecture as part of the annual Harrison Lecture Series on Nov. 14 at 4 p.m. in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium in Giles Hall.

Salinas works for Rojkind Arquitectos, a Mexico City-based architecture firm whose work spans across a diverse and global platform. Salinas is engaged in implementing and expanding the firm’s mission of designing highly experiential, civic-minded spaces and works to discover new methods and opportunities to expand architectural practice.

The Harrison Lecture Series is presented by the School of Architecture and is made possible by a generous gift from Dr. and Mrs. Robert V.M. Harrison, FAIA, FCSI.

View the full Harrison Lecture Series schedule.

CAAD research centers receive AIA/MS 2014 Design Awards

November 6th, 2014 Comments Off

web 24-Women in Construction Training Center copy

Women in Construction Training Center (GCCDS)

23- Baptist Town_Disk Three_Image

Baptist Town Master Plan (CSTC)

On October 16, the Mississippi Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA Mississippi) hosted a Design Awards Celebration in Jackson to honor recipients of its Design Awards and Member Awards, as well as newly licensed architects, landscape architects and interior designers in the state.

The two research centers housed in Mississippi State University’s College of Architecture, Art and Design both were honored at the event.

The Gulf Coast Community Design Studio (GCCDS) received an Honor Award in the Architecture/New Construction category for the Women in Construction Training Center for the Moore Community House.

Women in Construction is an organization that trains and assists women to get jobs in construction-related fields. Over the years Women in Construction has been a partner with the GCCDS on many projects for homeowners and for the community.

David Perkes, director of the GCCDS said, “It was especially rewarding to work with them to create a work space that embodies their ‘can-do’ culture. Building the project was as important as getting it built, and the completed building is a testament of the capability of the women students, staff and volunteers.”

The Carl Small Town Center (CSTC) received a Citation Award in the Master Planning and Urban Design Category for the Baptist Town Master Plan for the Greenwood Leflore Carroll Economic Development Foundation.

“The award for the Baptist Town Master Plan reaffirms the longterm effort the CSTC has made in its commitment to Greenwood and the Baptist Town neighborhood,” said Leah Kemp, assistant director of the CSTC. “We are starting to see these master plan elements come to life as recent housing has been installed and the community center is under renovation.”

“It is a testament to the School of Architecture’s commitment to ‘community design’ and ‘social justice’ when our research centers are recognized for their amazing outreach work with Design Awards from the AIA Mississippi Chapter,” said Michael Berk, F.L. Crane Professor and director of the School of Architecture. “The work that our centers produce is nothing short of heroic — and the impacts to the communities will be felt for generations.”

The AIA Mississippi Design Awards program is part of the annual program of events, Mississippi Celebrates Architecture, presented by AIA Mississippi. The goal of the program, which also features an Educational Symposium and a Public Outreach and Exhibition, is to promote and celebrate the role of architecture in Mississippi’s culture. The Design Awards program further seeks to encourages design excellence and elevate the quality of architecture and design in the state by recognizing and honoring members’ works of distinction.

 

Several alumni and friends of the School of Architecture were also honored at the event. See the full list of AIA/MS 2014 Design Awards below.

Honor Awards:
Albert & Associates Architects, P.A.
(Renovation/Restoration)
Charnley-Norwood House Restoration
Mississippi Dept. of Marine Resources
& Mississippi Dept. of Archives and History

• Cooke Douglass Farr Lemons Architects & Engineers, PA
(Architecture/New Construction)
Puckett Machinery Headquarters
Hastings Puckett

• Gulf Coast Community Design Studio
(Architecture/New Construction)
Women in Construction Training Center
Moore Community House

Merit Awards:
JBHM Architecture
(Architecture/New Construction)
Tupelo Aquatics Center
City of Tupelo

• Duvall Decker Architects, P.A.
(Renovation/Restoration)
James H. White Library Renovation
Mississippi Valley State University
Bureau of Building, Grounds and Real Property Management
State of Mississippi

• Duvall Decker Architects, P.A.
(Renovation/Restoration)
Mississippi Dept. of Information Technology Services
Cooperative Data Center
Bureau of Building, Grounds and Real Property Management
State of Mississippi

Citations:
• unabridged Architecture

(Architecture/New Construction)
Waveland Business Center
City of Waveland

• WFT Architects, P.A.
(Renovation/Restoration)
Rehabilitation of the Medgar Evers House Museum
Tougaloo College

• WFT Architects, P.A.
(Renovation/Restoration)
Exterior Rehabilitation of the John W. Boddie House
(The Mansion), Phase II
Tougaloo College

• Carl Small Town Center
(Master Planning Urban Design)
Baptist Town Master Plan
Greenwood Leflore Carroll Economic Development Foundation

• Belinda Stewart Architects, P.A.
(Architecture/New Construction)
Delta Blues Museum Muddy Waters Addition
Delta Blues Museum

School of Architecture, Building Construction Science to host ‘Integrated Project Delivery Theater’

November 5th, 2014 Comments Off

Vignette Diagram

(Via the ACSA website)

Mississippi State University’s School of Architecture and Building Construction Science Program, in cooperation with the Architecture and Construction Alliance (A+CA) announce the Integrated Project Delivery Theater. This interactive symposium is designed to introduce the exciting but complex world of Integrated Practice.

The two-day symposium features the project team responsible for the commission, design and construction of the New Orleans Bio Innovation Center, a LEED Gold building. Featured presenters include Jose Alvarez, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect and Principle with the 2014 AIA Firm of the Year Eskew+Dumez+Ripple; Kevin N. Overton, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Project Manager for Turner Construction Company; and Brian Bozeman, LEED AP, Executive Director ADAMS, (client’s representative) for the New Orleans Bio Innovation Center.

Coupled with this dynamic project team, integrated practice educators Assistant Professor Michele M. Herrmann, Esq.; Assistant Professor Emily M. McGlohn, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP; and Associate Professor Hans C. Herrmann, AIA, NCARB, LEED Green Assoc., will offer an exceptional educational opportunity. The unique interactive theater-like presentation includes problem-based learning activities and illustrative visual and verbal presentations designed to generate synthetic comprehension of IPD.

The A+CA, through its generous sponsorship, has enabled the MSU faculty to develop this special event. As a critical component to the symposium’s success, the A+CA and MSU School of Architecture and Building Construction Science Program invite students and faculty members from all programs of study engaged in Integrated Project Delivery to attend.

The free symposium will be held in Giles Hall on the MSU campus in charming Starkville, MS.

For more information on the participating practitioners and MSU faculty presenters please visit: http://caad.msstate.edu/wpmu/ipdtheater2015/

Symposium Date: January 29–30, 2015
Location: School of Architecture
Giles Hall, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
Local Accommodations: Hotel Chester, Downtown Starkville, MS

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