Architecture, BCS students create tensile membrane structures

April 17th, 2015 Comments Off

 
Building construction science and architecture students designed and constructed tensile membrane structures (tailgating tents) as part of Associate Professor John Poros’s combined Structures II studio course.
The students tested their designs in The Junction and invited faculty and others to join them for an informal review.

Architecture students gain funding, experience during Student E-Week competition

April 15th, 2015 Comments Off

LEFT: Investing in Innovation Day keynote speaker Gary Butler said culture, the by-product of core values, is the key to a successful company. Chairman and CEO of Camgian Microsystems, Butler reminded student-entrepreneurs in the audience that "your company ultimately will become the manifestation of your core values." (Photo by Keats Haupt) RIGHT: Twenty-five MSU students representing 17 startup businesses received cash awards during the Office of Technology Management and Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center's 2015 Investing in Innovation Day. (Photo by Russ Houston)

LEFT: Investing in Innovation Day keynote speaker Gary Butler said culture, the by-product of core values, is the key to a successful company. Chairman and CEO of Camgian Microsystems, Butler reminded student-entrepreneurs in the audience that “your company ultimately will become the manifestation of your core values.” (Photo by Keats Haupt) RIGHT: Twenty-five MSU students representing 17 startup businesses received cash awards during the Office of Technology Management and Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center’s 2015 Investing in Innovation Day. (Photo by Russ Houston)

By Sasha Steinberg | Mississippi State

Twenty-five Mississippi State students are winners of the university’s fourth annual “Investing in Innovation,” or I-3 Day.

Organized by the university’s Office of Technology Management and Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center, the annual conference that also is part of Entrepreneurship Week hosted student business plan competitions, with cash awards totaling more than $39,000. Judged by 30 industry-respected leaders from companies all across the region, business model pitches were evaluated on company technology, management, financials, and market.

“We have so much positive momentum because of a great team we have at so many different levels that is committed to strive for excellence and innovation,” said MSU Vice President for Research and Economic Development David R. Shaw. “I am certainly proud of the innovation atmosphere and spirit that we’re continuing to encourage and see thrive here at Mississippi State University.”

MSU Vice President for Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Gregory Bohach also congratulated the innovators being recognized and expressed appreciation for the administrative support of deans, directors and department heads, as well as the offices of Research and Economic Development and Technology Management.

“Today is the culmination of many years of research, scholarly activity, and hard work. At Mississippi State, we do a really good job of translating our research and scholarly activities to benefit the citizens of Mississippi and the world. I really appreciate all that you all do and thank you for the teamwork that you display,” he said.

Gary Butler, chairman and CEO of Camgian Microsystems, was the event’s keynote speaker. Recently ranked in the 50 Most Promising Internet of Things Companies, Butler’s company was founded in 2006 with the vision of becoming a leader in combining innovative technologies in the areas of low-power microelectronics, sensors, wireless communications and data analysis to provide valuable decision analytics for customers in the government and commercial markets.

“What is the secret sauce to building a great company?” Butler first asked the entrepreneurial students in the audience.

While he agreed that “people,” “hustle,” “fix a problem,” “satisfy customers,” “patience,” “passion,” and “cash flow” all are important, Butler told the students that the key component is culture, which is the by-product of core values.

“If you’re starting a company today, the most important thing is that you establish those core values because culture is the unique thing that will make you different in the market,” he said. “Your company ultimately will become the manifestation of your core values.”

Butler discussed the three core values and resulting culture that he and his Camgian team implement every day.

“Our core values are based around three concepts: team, no quit, and playing to win. When we talk about team, we talk about it in the context of three components–having clear roles and responsibilities, clear goals and metrics, and most importantly, accountability,” said the University of Cambridge engineering doctoral graduate.

Having team members ask themselves whether they are “playing to win” drives a new degree of urgency and ambition around the Camgian organization, Butler said.

Butler, who also holds a Tulane University bachelor’s and Vanderbilt University master’s degree in mechanical engineering, reminded audience members that “success is ultimately built on failure.”

“What’s important is not that you fail. It’s what you learn from failure that’s important,” he emphasized when explaining the importance of having a “no quit” mentality. “When I first started the company, my focus really was around strategy and execution. What I quickly learned was that culture is the engine that drives performance of the organization, and you’ve got to get that right from the very beginning.”

2015 Entrepreneurship Week student winners from the startup competitions include:

ALEXANDRIA, Virginia–Kylie D. Hayes, a senior business administration major, first place, Conceptual (I) Startup Competition, as well as second place, Final Startup Competition, both for Kylight.

BLUE SPRINGS–Aleksander Sina, a junior chemical engineering/biomolecular engineering major, first place, Post-Revenue Startup competition, for Tortilleria San Felipe.

BRANDON–Jarred C. Creel, a junior architecture major, second place, Prototype (II) Startup Competition, for ArcFolio; and Taylor A. Lee, a senior business administration major, second place and People’s Choice Award, E-Commerce Competition, for StruggleBusBox.com.

BROOKHAVEN–John C. Mooney, a senior marketing major, first place, Student Elevator Pitch Competition, for Consumables.

COLLIERVILLE, Tennessee–Lisa N. Hankes, a senior communication/public relations major, Conceptual (I) Startup Competition People’s Choice Award, for Quill Club.

COLUMBUS–Thomas K. Fitzner, a senior marketing/international business and foreign language/French double-major, first place, E-Commerce Competition, for FestiFix.com; Andrew S. Smith, a sophomore business administration/international business and foreign language/Spanish double-major, People’s Choice Award, Prototype (II) Startup competition, for I Wish It Was Real; and Hagan D. Walker, a senior electrical engineering major, first place, Prototype (II) Startup Competition, as well as first place and People’s Choice Award, Final Startup Competition, all for Vibe.

CUMMING, Georgia–Emilee E. Arnold, a junior marketing major, second place and People’s Choice Award, E-Commerce Competition, for StruggleBusBox.com.

HATTIESBURG–Landon L. Dale, a junior business information systems major, Conceptual (I) Startup Competition People’s Choice Award, for Quill Club.

HOOVER, Alabama–Daniel S. Crist, a senior electrical engineering major, second place, Prototype (I) Startup Competition, for Akimbo Games.

JACKSON–Ankit S. “Keith” Kakadia, a senior marketing major, People’s Choice Award, Post-Revenue Startup Competition, for Advertees.

PASCAGOULA–Katherine L. “Kaylie” Mitchell, a fine arts/graphic design major, first place, Prototype (II) Startup Competition, first place and People’s Choice Award, Final Startup Competition, as well as People’s Choice Award, Student Elevator Pitch Competition, all for Vibe.

PETAL–Cody Smith, a senior electrical engineering major, second place, Prototype (I) Startup Competition, for Akimbo Games.

SAINT CHARLES, Missouri–Curtis M. Reed, a junior architecture major, second place, Prototype (II) Startup Competition, for ArcFolio.

SOUTHAVEN–Julie N. Burke, a junior business administration major, second place and People’s Choice Award, E-Commerce Competition, for StruggleBusBox.com.

STARKVILLE– Ben Bailey, a senior management/international business and foreign language/Spanish double-major, first place, Conceptual (II) Startup competition, for Shot Swap; William C. Sanders, a kinesiology/sports administration master’s student, first place and a People’s Choice Award, Prototype (I) Startup Competition, for Xchange Group of MS; Andrew S. Stamps, a computer science doctoral student, second-place, Conceptual (I) Startup Competition, for 2D Knights; and Trey P. Wallace, a freshman computer engineering major, first place, Conceptual (II) Startup competition, for Shot Swap.

TOWN CREEK, Alabama–Claire Wilson, a senior communication/public relations major, second place and People’s Choice Award, E-Commerce Competition, for StruggleBusBox.com.

VARDAMAN–Alejandro Gracia, a senior business administration/international business and foreign language/Spanish double-major, first place, Post-Revenue Startup competition, for Tortilleria San Felipe.

VICKSBURG–Matt Waddle, a junior mechanical engineering major, second place and a People’s Choice Award, Conceptual (II) Startup competition, for Glassio; second place, Student Elevator Pitch Competition, for Squares.

WOODSTOCK, Georgia–Justin J. Stanfill, a junior management major, second place, Post-Revenue Startup competition, for Stanny’s Tackle Co.

MSU Entrepreneurship Week 2015 and I-3 Day was made possible by Tellus Operating Group, LLC; Talos Energy, LLC; MSU alumnus Mark Dumas; Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell and Berkowitz, PC; and MSU’s Thad Cochran Endowment for Entrepreneurship, College of Business, and James Worth Bagley College of Engineering.

For more “Entrepreneurship Week” or “I-3 Day” information, contact Eric Hill, program manager for the university’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, at 662-325-3521 or ehill@ecenter.msstate.edu.

The center is a university-wide resource committed to creating a culture of entrepreneurial activity, providing means to support business start-ups with awards, providing business planning and mentoring with MSU partners, creating an alumni network of entrepreneurs, and partnering with private businesses to expand opportunities.

Learn more about the E-Center at ecenter.msstate.edu, facebook.com/msstateecenter, twitter.com/MSStateECenter, and instagram.com/msstateecenter; the Office of Technology Management at iptl.msstate.edu.

 

Read the story at WCBI.

CAAD research center provides fresh prospective at state conference

April 13th, 2015 Comments Off

Johnson

Johnson

Kelsey Johnson, planner with MSU’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio, was asked to present at the 2015 Mississippi Water Resources Conference in Jackson on April 7.

The Design Studio – one of two research centers in the College of Architecture, Art and Design – was able to bring a fresh perspective to the conference, which has a heavy science focus.

Johnson presented on the significant role of education and outreach during the development of a watershed implementation plan.  Since the end of 2013, the Design Studio has been facilitating the development of a watershed implementation plan for Rotten Bayou Watershed in Hancock and Harrison Counties.

The presentation was titled “Improving Water Quality through Watershed Planning, Design & Innovative Outreach Activities.”  Strategies presented included working with nontraditional partners such as a churches, libraries, golf courses and an educational puppet show; utilizing social media and raffles to make participation appealing and accessible; and leveraging funding from NOAA’s Gulf of Mexico B-WET Program to connect students at a local elementary school to the watershed planning work.

CAAD research center director has book chapter republished

April 13th, 2015 Comments Off

Associate Professor John Poros, director of the Carl Small Town Center (CSTC), recently had a chapter re-published in the two-volume book, Architecture and Mathematics from Antiquity to the Future.

Vol. 1: Antiquity to the 1500s

Vol. 2: The 1950s and the Future

Poros’ chapter, “The Ruled Geometries of Marcel Breuer,”provides an important contribution to this research archive that highlights the diverse relationships between the disciplines of mathematics and architecture through the century.

MSU architecture student presents at international education symposium

April 13th, 2015 Comments Off

IMG_6269 IMG_6268

Ryan Fierro, a third-year Mississippi State University School of Architecture student, recently presented his research at the 2015 North American Materials Education Symposium at Ohio State University.

Fierro, son of Mario and Sheila Fierro of Madison, Ala., began his research last summer under the supervision of Assistant Professor Jacob A. Gines.

Fierro was initially looking into the building product manufacturing processes for wood, glass, steel and concrete and their effect on the state of the atmosphere and the buildings in which they exist. However, in the course of his research, he shifted his focus as he began to understand more about certain byproducts that can be used as a substitute for Portland Cement, the chief binding agent in concrete.

Fierro presented these results, “Building Materials Stewardship and Sustainable Practices,” at MSU’s summer 2014 Undergraduate Research Symposium.

“It was nice to get to really dive into something,” said Fierro, who decided he wanted to build upon his findings while serving as a teaching assistant for Gines this semester.

The replacement ingredients Fierro came across during his summer research became the center of his new work. He outlined the ways various substances similar in nature to cement can be used and the effects such use would have.

“By its very nature, the production of Portland cement is catastrophically bad for the environment,” said Fierro. “For every pound of cement produced, an equal pound of CO2 is released into the atmosphere.”

Fierro hopes his research can provide solutions to this egregious situation and serve as a referential guide for any builder or designer curious about the substances he studied.

Impressed by his work, Gines encouraged Fierro to submit to the 2015 North America Materials Education Symposium.

“The United States is the third largest producer of Portland Cement in the world, producing over 77 million tons a year,” said GInes. “India is number two, producing 280 millions tons, and China leads the way with around 2.5 trillion tons per year. The environmental impacts of producing Portland Cement are well documented. Ryan’s research is eye-opening and informative regarding various alternatives to Portland Cement as a key ingredient in concrete.”

Both Fierro’s posters – including his most recent, “Mapping the Regional Landscape of Building Materials,” – were accepted for presentation at the rotating international education conference, which brings together material educators.

“Being around people that were interested in the same things that I am was a breath of fresh air,” said Fierro.

“Presenting to a room full of material scientists and engineers can be daunting for an undergraduate architecture student,” said Gines. “But Ryan did an amazing job and won the respect of many in the process. His work was very well received by the audience.”

Grants help ‘Audit Squad’ get started

April 10th, 2015 Comments Off

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of a 20K House at Auburn University's Rural Studio. They also demonstrated how to use the equipment.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of a 20K House at Auburn University’s Rural Studio. They also demonstrated how to use the equipment.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS.(Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Students testing air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, MS. (Photo: Emily McGlohn)

Emily McGlohn has been experimenting with ways to introduce one of her research interests, the relationship between energy efficiency and the quality of construction, into the MSU’s School of Architecture curriculum while helping out the state at the same time.

“Building performance is easily tested with building diagnostic tools such as a blower door and thermal imaging camera,” said McGlohn.

So, the assistant professor used funds from her 2014 Schillig Grant, which she received for teaching excellence, to purchase the necessary testing equipment, and she secured a $500 Center for the Advancement of Service Learning Excellence (CASLE) mini grant to support travel.

McGlohn started an independent study course and recruited students interested in the topic. “The Audit Squad,” as she has dubbed the group, has been working this year to collect and analyze data.

In the fall, the Audit Squad – which includes Ria Bennet, third-year architecture major; Cody Smith, fourth-year architecture major; and Bill Plot, fourth-year building construction science major – traveled to Greenwood to test air infiltration rates of the new Katrina cottages in the Baptist Town neighborhood.

“The best way to understand how a building performs is to actually test it with tools,” said McGlohn, who explained that the lower the air infiltration rate, the better the envelope. “A high air infiltration rate signifies a leaky building.”

The group also paid a visit to the Auburn University’s Rural Studio to perform tests on some of their projects. While at the Rural Studio, McGlohn presented a lecture on air infiltration, and her Audit Squad shared what they had learned.

“The students loved it,” she said. “It was a lot of fun.”

After analyzing their results, the squad began working on their own independent research project, which they have submitted to the upcoming MSU Undergraduate Research Symposium. They used the newly purchased tools to test the air infiltration rates of a variety of student rental properties built in Starkville over the last 40 years to see if age has anything to do with the rates.

This summer, the research will continue in Greenwood.

Teaming up with the College of Architecture, Art and Design’s Enterprise Rose Fellow, Emily Roush Elliott, the Audit Squad will test the air infiltration rates of a variety of low-income housing in the Greenwood area to compare the typical rental property with more modern low-incoming housing.

The data will be analyzed next fall to try to quantify the monetary and health burdens that can come from leaky, low-income housing. The findings and suggestions for improvement will be shared in a brochure for distribution to nonprofit organizations that could benefit from the data.

“The overall main goal,” said McGlohn, “is to create a baseline metric of energy efficiency rates for low-income housing in the Mississippi Delta.”

School of Architecture announces final 2015 jury schedule

April 9th, 2015 Comments Off

collaborative studio reviews 04302014_31

All reviews will occur in the Giles Gallery or Michael Fazio Jury Room in Giles Hall, Starkville.

Fri., April 24, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
First-Year Studio
Coordinator: Assistant Professor Andrew Tripp
The first-year studio will be presenting final proposals for a stargazer’s retreat.  The content of the studio is focused on the fundamental topics of orientation, order, proportion and the elemental language of architectural form.

Mon., April 27, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Second-Year Studio
Coordinator: Assistant Professor Justin Taylor
The second-year studio will be presenting their Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge research station. The studio is focused on interventions into the landscape, utilizing pre-existing site structures.

Tues., April 28, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Third-Year: Collaborative Studio
Coordinator: Assistant Professor Tom Leathem
The third-year spring Collaborative Studio is a partnership between the School of Architecture and the Building Construction Science Program. The students are combined into teams of three to four students with at least one student from each department in each team. The student teams are designing a new fire station in Starkville for the Starkville Fire Department. The students have been working with their faculty, professional architects and professional constructors to develop the project.

Wed., April 29, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Fourth-Year Studio
Coordinator: Associate Professor Hans Herrmann
The fourth-year design studio is developing proposals for a New Library in the city of Copenhagen, Denmark. This studio is the demonstration point for Integrative/Comprehensive Design. Students will present projects inclusive of Visioning, Programming, Site Design, Structural, Active and Passive Systems with a special focus on Water Ecology. The libraries will be approx. 12,000 sq.ft. in size with an additional exterior theater space accommodating up to 200 viewers. Click here to see the full description of the project.

Thurs., April 30, 10-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Fri., May 1, 9-6 p.m. (with possible evening session)
Fifth-Year Studio
Coordinator: Jackson Center Director Jassen Callender
Independent thesis projects

NOTE: All times are subject to a bit of change (due to the nature of the review process) along with breaks for lunch. Please contact the school to confirm the final schedule as it relates to weather or other unforeseen circumstances.

MSU School of Architecture alumnus honored with ‘Future Project Award’

April 9th, 2015 Comments Off

Courtesy of Perkins+Will / Illustration:MIR

Courtesy of Perkins+Will / Illustration:MIR

(Via Perkins+Will)

Scott Allen, a New York-based project/ lead designer with the global architecture and design firm Perkins+Will and a 2010 graduate of the Mississippi State University School of Architecture, recently traveled to Cannes, France, to accept an Architectural Review / MIPIM Future Project Award for one of his latest projects.

Allen was one of around 28,000 in attendance of the global real-estate event along with 200 architects and industry elite from across the globe who came together for the 14th annual awards celebration.

Perkins+Will was honored with the award in the Tall Buildings category for conceptual plans of its East 37th Street Residential Tower in New York City, slated to begin construction in early 2017 with a late 2018 completion date. The 700-foot-tall Manhattan tower boasts a “shimmering, angled curtain wall” organized around five clusters of shared amenity space and open-air gardens. See all of the winners here.

“The idea is to create a new kind of communal ecosystem of social relationships within a thin tower design,” said Allen. “Rather than giving residents small, almost unusable balconies as seen in many towers, they will enjoy big community terraces that are the kind of social and interactive spaces in high demand today. It’s about re-imagining a new type of architectural ecosystem in residential high-rise design (or even commercial high-rise design) to help evolve the way we understand vertical city life.”

Read more about the Midtown Manhattan tower concept here.

The Future Project Awards celebrates excellence in unbuilt projects worldwide that are examples of fine architecture but have also responded to the client’s development brief while considering the way in which they will impact and contribute to the community around them. All entries were assessed by an international jury chaired by Paul Finch, editorial director, The Architectural Review & The Architects’ Journal. See the 2015 judges here.

Scott’s work has garnered considerable attention for his idealistic yet practically rooted creative solutions that steer clear of conventional architectural responses. His process profiles architecture’s fundamental relationships and each project’s creative response to global commerce, sustainability, location and economy in design. His projects are currently taking shape from Manhattan to Kuwait, Riyadh to Washington, D.C., and coming soon to Istanbul. As a major part of the New York practice, Scott has secured a series of new projects over the past year including two future major New York City Skyscrapers, a future net-zero office development in Greenburgh, a Global Consumer Goods North American Headquarters, and two 1 million+ square foot mixed-used developments in New York and Istanbul.

Scott’s portfolio encompasses over thirty million square feet of work throughout a broad range of building types, ranging from residential and office skyscrapers, hospitals, master plans, corporate headquarters and large-scale universities. He is currently involved in a number of projects across North America, Europe, the Middle East, Australia and Asia where his work has been seen in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Architectural Record, Fortune, Fast Company, Bloomberg Business, CNN, USA Today, World Landscape Architecture, Arch Daily, Architizer, Design Boom numerous other publications and events, and exhibited in museums and galleries nationally and abroad.

Contact Scott at w.scott.allen@perkinswill.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/wscotta

Project Team
Design Principal: Rob Goodwin
Project/ Lead Designer: W Scott Allen
Design Team: Jordan Hanson, Aimee Hultquist
Business Development Director: Cagri Kanver

About Perkins+Will
Perkins+Will is an interdisciplinary, research-based architecture and design firm established in 1935 and founded on the belief that design has the power to transform lives and enhance communities. Each of the firm’s 24 offices focuses on local, regional and global work in a variety of practice areas. With hundreds of award-winning projects annually, Perkins+Will is highly ranked among top global design firms. Perkins+Will is recognized as one of the industry’s preeminent sustainable design firms due to its innovative research, design tools and expertise. The firm’s 1,600 professionals are thought leaders in developing 21st century solutions to inspire the creation of spaces in which clients and their communities work, heal, live and learn. Social responsibility is a fundamental aspect of Perkins+Will’s culture and every year the company donates 1% of its design services to pro bono initiatives. In 2015, Fast Company ranked Perkins+Will among “The World’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Architecture.” For more information, visit www.perkinswill.com.

About the developer – NEF
Nef is a real estate brand within Timur Holding, bringing even the smallest places to life since 2010 and aiming to design thoughtful living spaces for people who care. Nef has brought its signature to successful development projects in Turkey and six other countries, based on original market research and expert analysis of the industry-specific needs of today’s large metropolis. Nef focuses on the design needs of every target audience – from the smallest details such as ceramics and door handles to all the indoor and outdoor features of its projects – and Nef provides all key services including design concepts and development services through marketing and sales. Our goal is to bring a breath of fresh air to the real estate industry, and we collaborate with several of the best architecture firms of the world – so that we will be among the best and most respectable real estate firms in the world. For more information: Zelal Varul Er, Team Communication and Consultancy, zelal@teamiletisim.com / 0533 554 44 10.

Architecture library associate named MSU PCSW Outstanding Woman

April 8th, 2015 Comments Off

The President's Commission on the Status of Women recognized seven ladies with Outstanding Women Awards on Tuesday. From left are honorees Taylor Trippe, Tammie Tubbs and Nicole Rader; MSU Provost and Executive Vice President Jerry Gilbert; and honorees Vemitra White, Leah Pylate, Judy Hammett and Michelle Lewis. Photo by: Megan Bean

The President’s Commission on the Status of Women recognized seven ladies with Outstanding Women Awards on Tuesday. From left are honorees Taylor Trippe, Tammie Tubbs and Nicole Rader; MSU Provost and Executive Vice President Jerry Gilbert; and honorees Vemitra White, Leah Pylate, Judy Hammett and Michelle Lewis. Photo by: Megan Bean

(Via WCBI)

Hammett

Hammett

Mississippi State took time out Tuesday to honor some outstanding women for their contributions on campus and in the community.

The MSU President’s Commission on the Status of Women presented its annual Outstanding Women and Student Leadership Awards.

Each year the University selects notable women from the Student Body, Faculty, Staff, and Community.

Those recognized this year are:

Outstanding Faculty Woman – Dr. Nicole Rader, Associate Professor of Sociology.

Outstanding Professional Staff Woman – Leah Pylate, Asst. Director for Sexual Assault in the Department of Health, Education, and Wellness

Outstanding Support Staff Woman – Judy Hammett , Senior Library Associate, College of Architecture, Art, and Design (Hammett was nominated for the award by Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory with the support of Dean Jim West.)

Outstanding Graduate Woman – Vemitra White, Ph.D Candidate, Instructional Systems and Workforce Development

Student Leadership Awards – Michelle Lewis, Senior, Accounting and Taylor Trippe, Senior, Biology

Outstanding Community Woman – Tammie Tubbs, Host and Executive Producer of “Talking With Tammie” (Christian Television Network)

Read the story by Leah Barbour on MSU’s website.

MSU architecture professor to serve as site coordinator for 2015 Society for Building Science Educators’ retreat

April 7th, 2015 Comments Off

McGlohn

McGlohn

Emily McGlohn’s proposal to serve as site coordinator for the 2015 Society for Building Science Educators’ retreat was recently accepted.

McGlohn, assistant professor at the Mississippi State University School of Architecture, will partner with committee chair Professor Alison Kwok, Ph.D. from the University of Oregon, to coordinate this summer’s Society for Building Science Educators’ retreat.

The retreat, with a “Regions and Localities” theme, will be held June 16-19 in Highlands, N.C.

Building science educators gather for the conference each summer to discuss teaching methods and have conversations about class projects.

Herman

Herman

At the conference, McGlohn will also present on “The Audit Squad,” her year-long independent study course where students are analyzing building performance and the relationship to energy efficiency and quality of construction.

Erik Herman, visiting assistant professor, will also represent MSU as a program committee member.

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