Fall 2017 Collaborative Studio booklet

January 15th, 2018 Comments Off on Fall 2017 Collaborative Studio booklet

Honors students in the Fall 2017 Collaborative Studio created a booklet showcasing work from the semester.

Forty-four architecture and 39 building construction science students collaborated on the design and construction of benches used by 13 American Utopian communities and also built benches of their own design.

Professors:
Associate Professor Alexis Gregory (architecture)
Briar Jones, lecturer (building construction science)
Visiting Associate Professor George Martin (building construction science)
Professor John Poros (architecture)

Check it out on ISSUU.

Fall 2016 Collaborative Studio builds Boy Scout cabin

December 19th, 2016 Comments Off on Fall 2016 Collaborative Studio builds Boy Scout cabin

MSU Fall 2016 Collaborative Studio – Boy Scout Cabin BUILD time lapse from CAADatMSU on Vimeo.

Final model of the Boy Scout cabin from CAADatMSU on Vimeo. (Model by Honors students: Daniel Ruff and Abby Jackson)

The fall 2016 Collaborative Tectonics Studio, which consisted of second-year students studying architecture (41 students) and building construction science (40 students), spent the semester building a cabin for the Hood Boy Scout Reservation in Hazelhurst, Miss., approximately 180 miles from the MSU main campus in Starkville.

Architecture faculty members for the studio included Associate Professor Hans Herrmann, Briar Jones (visiting practitioner) and Associate Professor John Poros.

Building construction science faculty included Lee Carson, lecturer, and Visiting Assistant Professor Mohammed Mawlana, Ph.D. 

Herrmann, who served as studio coordinator and project P.I., worked closley with Larry Cagle, field director and lead contact for the Hood Reservation for the project. He also worked closely with School of Architecture alumnus and architect John McBride with the Boy Scouts. 

Additional Boy Scout supports/sponsors for the project included:
Andrew Jackson, Council
Tony Haines, Scout Executive/ CEO
Dr. Steve Zachow, Council Executive Board President
Property and Maintenance Committee:
Billy Boykin
Robby Bush
Ken Echols
Stephen Heard
Joe Lewis
Tim Rooks
Charlie Smith
Col. David Smith
Steve Smith
Joe Stamper
Jim Ulmer

The project was funded by the Boy Scouts with a partial match by the School of Architecture and College of Architecture, Art and Design. 


Students present their final projects. (images via Hans Herrmann) 

Aside from the prototype Steep Slope Cabin (referring to the typical hillside site condition the cabins are designed to fit on) that students built in the first half of the term, each student also generated an individual proposal for a second prototype cabin.

Master planning a second grouping of 16 cabins, or what’s known as a “village” on the reservation, these cabins were designed to accommodate a different user group for corporate retreat style events. (Above images show students presenting these projects at the final review).

See some of the students’ final portfolios, which outline their final project in assembly sequence drawings:
Abby Jackson Portfolio
Maria Ory Portfolio
Daniel Ruff Portfolio

Annual collaborative student competition held

September 14th, 2015 Comments Off on Annual collaborative student competition held


Brasfield and Gorrie Student Design Competition 2015 from CAADatMSU on Vimeo.

The Fifth Annual Brasfield & Gorrie Student Design Competition was held from Mon., Aug. 17 through Fri., Aug. 28.

Ten teams composed of students from the four departments in the College of Architecture, Art and Design worked together over these two intensive weeks to create a branding, interior design, architectural design and construction strategy for a new local brewery, SweetGum Brewing Company.

The students presented their final work at the Cullis Wade Depot Art Gallery on Fri., Aug. 28 from 1:30 – 4 p.m. Reviewers from Brasfield & Gorrie General Contractors, Fuscia Architects and Brewworks and SweetGum Brewing Company attended to review the student work and to choose teams for the top three design awards.

The winning teams were:

First Place
first place

  • Michael Carraway – Building Construction Science
  • Brent Gaudé – Building Construction Science
  • Vanessa Holden – Interior Design
  • Edward Holmes V – Architecture
  • Casey Jennings – Graphic Design
  • Ben Marshall – Architecture
  • Jared Robinson – Architecture

Second Place
second place

  • Ashton Aime – Architecture
  • Caleb Fearing – Architecture
  • Liz Grantham – Interior Design
  • Robby Keifer – Building Construction Science
  • Keith Kellum- Graphic Design
  • Anna Strohm – Interior Design
  • Nathan Thomas – Architecture

Third Place
third place

  • Kyle Alford – Building Construction Science
  • Kaiyla Barber – Graphic Design
  • Ria Bennett – Architecture
  • Josh Johnson – Architecture
  • Kalyn Johnson – Interior Design
  • Luke Marshall – Architecture
  • Cheyenne Underwood – Interior Design

Click here to view the winning team projects on our student work site.

Students hard at work:

Final presentations:

 

Q&A by Marissa Landon:BrasfieldClick here to download the PDF file.

Spring Collaborative Studio presents final projects

April 29th, 2015 Comments Off on Spring Collaborative Studio presents final projects

The Spring Collaborative Studio, which included third-year architecture and building construction science students and professors from both units, presented their final reviews on April 28, 2015 in Giles Hall.

For the project, the student teams designed a new fire station in Starkville for the Starkville Fire Department. The students have been working with their faculty, professional architects and professional constructors to develop the project.

Architecture, BCS students create tensile membrane structures

April 17th, 2015 Comments Off on Architecture, BCS students create tensile membrane structures

 
Building construction science and architecture students designed and constructed tensile membrane structures (tailgating tents) as part of Associate Professor John Poros’s combined Structures II studio course.
The students tested their designs in The Junction and invited faculty and others to join them for an informal review.

Student-designed, built shelters now open at MSU Golf Course

March 27th, 2015 Comments Off on Student-designed, built shelters now open at MSU Golf Course

Golf_Course-shelters-ribboncut_20150323_M4B4124_1

Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State

Golf_Course-shelters-ribboncut_20150323_M4B4179

Photo by Megan Bean | Mississippi State

By Leah Barbour | Mississippi State University

Local golf enthusiasts joined Mississippi State University administrators, faculty, staff and students this week for the unveiling of two on-course shelters at the MSU Golf Course.

The new structures at the fourth and 10th holes, complete with men’s and women’s accommodations and cart parking spaces on each side, were designed and built by second-year architecture and second-year building construction science students.

Both the School of Architecture and the building construction science academic program are part of MSU’s College of Architecture, Art and Design.

The work was completed during the fall semester collaborative studio, coordinated by associate professor Hans Herrmann and assistant professor Emily McGlohn of the architecture school, along with assistant professor Tom Leathem and lecturer Lee Carson of building construction science.

“Thank you for your active involvement, for the collective leadership from all our faculty and for everyone involved in this,” said MSU President Mark E. Keenum at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. “This is an opportunity to really showcase what Mississippi State talent is about. What a great new addition this is, not only to this golf course, but to our professional golf management program.”

The PGM program, housed in the College of Business, is the second oldest sanctioned by the Professional Golfers’ Association of America. Students completing the four-and-a-half-year curriculum receive a bachelor’s degree in marketing and 16 months of practical work experience.

Michael Berk, architecture school director, said MSU is the only institution of higher learning in the country to require all second-year architecture and building construction science students to complete a full year of collaborative studio.

“There’s no other school in the nation to require two full semesters of working together,” agreed Jim West, dean of the College of Architecture, Art and Design. “Our students have the opportunity to do truly collaborative work, and we’re always interested in having these types of projects for the community and our students and faculty.”

Though building construction science and architecture students have completed their portion of the project, MSU Department of Landscape Architecture students will continue by improving the landscaping around the buildings, said Craig Capano, director of the building construction science program.

“This is only the first of many projects that I hope we can all do together,” he said. “We’ve already started discussions about next fall, and the faculty have some great ideas. And that’s what Mississippi State is all about–it’s about learning; it’s about changing; it’s about improving.”

Sharon Oswald, College of Business dean, emphasized the on-course shelters also benefit PGM students.

“I want to thank the faculty, and particularly the students, on behalf of the PGM program and the MSU Golf Course,” Oswald said. “We love collaborative projects, and anything we can ever do to help, we will.”

The 6,390-yard, par-72 course, located three miles east of campus at 1520 Old Highway 82, opened to the public in 1986. Along with the two on-course shelters, cart path and driving range, the course features a 5,000-square-foot clubhouse with men’s and women’s locker rooms, a snack bar, and a fully stocked golf shop and classroom.

MSU honored for architectural, design collaborations

March 20th, 2015 Comments Off on MSU honored for architectural, design collaborations

Mississippi State University faculty won the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture's Collaborative Practice Award for leadership in the design and construction of the Green Building Demonstration Pavilion, left, at Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville. (Photo by Megan Bean.) MSU faculty received the ACSA Design Build Honorable Mention for development of public transit shelters, including the one shown at right, for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians in Philadelphia. (Photo submitted.)

Mississippi State University faculty won the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture’s Collaborative Practice Award for leadership in the design and construction of the Green Building Demonstration Pavilion, left, at Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville. (Photo by Megan Bean.) MSU faculty received the ACSA Design Build Honorable Mention for development of public transit shelters, including the one shown at right, for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians in Philadelphia. (Photo submitted.)

By Leah Barbour | Mississippi State University

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture recently honored two Mississippi State faculty teams with education awards.

The Washington, D.C.,-based association annually recognizes university architecture faculty who complete exceptional projects in building design and community collaborations, among other categories.

MSU’s team from the College of Architecture, Art and Design and the MSU Extension Service received the 2014-15 ACSA Collaborative Practice Award for the Green Building Demonstration Pavilion at the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum in Starkville.

Recognized faculty include Cory Gallo, assistant professor of landscape architecture; Hans C. Herrmann, associate professor of architecture; Suzanne Powney, assistant professor of art; Justin Taylor, assistant clinical professor of architecture; Brian Templeton, extension associate in landscape architecture; and Wayne Wilkerson, associate extension professor.

The Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum, the regional demonstration site for green infrastructure and sustainable building technologies, took four years and more than 100 MSU students to complete. The Starkville museum was cited in the award for following best practices in school-based community outreach programs.

In 2013, the museum project also received major national recognition with the American Society of Landscape Architecture’s Award of Excellence in Student Collaboration, the highest honor bestowed by the ASLA.

Additionally, the 2014-15 ACSA Design Build Honorable Mention went to MSU faculty members who oversaw the project to build public transit shelters a student team developed for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians in Philadelphia.

In addition to Herrmann, the group of honored faculty are Alexis Gregory and Emily M. McGlohn, both assistant professors of architecture, and assistant professor Tom Leathem and lecturer Lee Carson, faculty in the college’s building construction science program.

“Award winners inspire and challenge students, contribute to the profession’s knowledge base and extend their work beyond the borders of academy into practice and the public sector,” according to the ACSA’s website, www.acsa-arch.org, where the winning applications are available.

CAAD hosts annual career panel discussion

February 5th, 2015 Comments Off on CAAD hosts annual career panel discussion

In conjunction with MSU’s Career Days, the College of Architecture, Art and Design held a panel discussion with representatives from the college’s four areas of study (architecture, art, interior design and building construction science.)

The panel was held on Feb. 4 from 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. in the Robert and Freda Harrison Auditorium in Giles Hall. A reception followed immediately after the question-and-answer session.

Beth Miller, director of the Interior Design Program, severed as moderator.

Panelists included:

• Architecture: Ann Somers, AIA, Principal, CDFL Architects + Engineers, P.A. Somers serves on the School of Architecture Advisory Board and is a 1981 graduate.
• Art: Mary Beth McDavid, Creative Director, DPM Fragrance
• Building Construction Science: Adam Moore and Trey Jacobs, Project Managers, Montgomery Martin Contractors, LLC. Jacobs and Moore graduated from the Building Construction Science Program in 2013.
• Interior Design: Ashley Hughes, NCIDQ, LEED AP BD+C, Certified Interior Designer MS & FL, Pryor & Morrow Architects & Engineers. Hughes is a 2007 graduate of the Interior Design Program.

The panel began with general introductions.

CAAD Career Panel from CAADatMSU on Vimeo.

Then, Miller, asked the first question: What do you look at in a potential new hire?

  • Moore said the most important thing is a good attitude and how you carry yourself. He also said being able to communicate is important.
  • Jacobs said he looks for experience of any type.
  • McDavid looks for candidates that have an “entrepreneurial spirit.” “We try to get an idea if a candidate can manage a project.” She encouraged students to have a job while in school and be involved to show they can balance work and school.
  • Hughes said, “how you carry yourself.” She said candidates should show confidence and also be open to learning from others. She encouraged students to ask questions and added that organization is also important.
  • Somers said the first look at a new candidate is the resume and letter. She said her firm looks at the graphics and tries to see if the candidate’s style matches the firm. Therefore, she encouraged students to match their resume to the firm. Somers said different things stand out to her – sometimes GPA, sometimes experience, sometimes design work. She said she loves when students say they are going to follow up with a phone call, and they actually follow through. She said her firm always brings in those candidates at least for a meeting.

Next, students were given the chance to ask questions.

What is your favorite part of the design process?

  • Somers said she enjoys the fact that as an architect, she gets to learn something new every day. She also enjoys collaboration with a team.
  • Hughes finds the most important part of her job is to make sure the client is happy with what her company provides. She said she enjoys the time after meeting with a client when she gets to work on developing the solution to the design problem.
  • McDavid enjoys customer interaction and agreed with Hughes that it’s enjoyable to solve a design problem. She also said it’s very rewarding to see a product she had a part in designing sitting on a retail shelf and being promoted internationally.
  • Moore said he doesn’t really have as much to do with the design process but enjoys that owners value his opinion on budget issues and being cost-effective with projects.

What are some of the responsibilities of a junior designer?

  • Hughes recalled a time at her first company when she was invited to lunch with the CEO. He told her that the number one thing he wanted her to do for him while working at the company was to learn. She agreed that the number one goal when starting a job should be to be willing to learn and have a willing attitude. “They will put into you what you are trying to get out of it,” she said, adding “You are just as much in control of your future as the person you work for, and that’s a really powerful thing.” Hughes also said that interior designers should expect to do a lot of drafting, and she praised the MSU Interior Design program for training her in Revit – something she said gave her a leg up in her first job.
  • McDavid said that the majority of their new hires are in their first job out of school. She said she loves that they are “not afraid to just jump in and run with it.” She encouraged everyone to take ownership and show initiative in projects and not to come in thinking of a position as a junior position. “Have the attitude of ‘what will I know in a month, and how can I make myself valuable to the company.'”
  • Somers added that students now are coming in with new skills that they are able to teach employees who have been working at companies longer.
  • Jacobs told students that entry-level jobs in his field involve a lot of paperwork. “They’ll put as much on you as you show you can handle. It’s a lot of on-the-job training,” he said, adding that the more you are willing to take on and learn, the quicker you will move up.
  • McDavid added that new hires shouldn’t be discouraged by having to do paperwork or the more mundane parts of a project. “Own those with passion,” she said.

What makes an employee the most valuable to a team?

  • Hughes said it’s important to be able to count on a team member – that a project will get done and get done correctly. She also said it’s important to be able to trust a team member.
  • Somers said, “Attitude is key,” adding that it’s important to be thorough, and that that’s often something that has to be learned – often through a more senior mentor.
  • McDavid values a team member who is able to take feedback, listen, ask questions, and apply it all.
  • Moore said it’s important to have initiative and a good attitude. “Go learn from the guy next to you,” he said.

(Directed toward construction representatives) What factors led toward your decision to work for a medium-sized contractor?

  • Moore and Jacobs both credited the decision partly on family and wanting to not move around as much. Moore added that he would have “felt like just another guy – a number” at a larger company, adding with pride that Mr. Montgomery Martin walks by him every day and knows him by name.
  • Hughes said her first company was medium-sized, and she values that she was able to get so much one-on-one training. “The most important thing I feel like I can tell you is in your interview process, try to gauge if they have a mentorship program because that is what is going to help you the most to further your career,” she said.
  • Somers said she has had the opportunity to travel and work at both large and small firms. She encouraged students to do the same. “I don’t think you’ll totally know what you want until you are immersed in it,” she said

(Directed toward architecture representative) What are the advantages of working for a large firm?

  • Somers said large firms usually have teams that work on culture and put more into training. “They have a different way they distribute work, and the mechanics are just different.” She also said how you rise to success is different in a large firm because there is usually stiff competition, which she said can often push you more.

The panel discussion ended with a final question from the moderator: What are some tips for the interview process?

Tips for an inteview – Adam Moore from CAADatMSU on Vimeo.

  • Jacobs: Be able to elaborate, be able to communicate, and be well-rounded.
  • McDavid: Ask questions and be conversational (not just one-word answers).
  • Hughes: “First impressions are key.” Know about the company, and know what your future goals are.
  • Somers: Her current firm (CDFL) looks to see if you are a good fit for the firm and will ask questions about your priorities in life and work. They want it to be a good fit for you as well. “Think about who you are interviewing with and know where you want to head in your career. You want the firm to want you as much as you want the job.” Somers added that larger firms seem to have more clear-cut interviews, and it’s good to have a salary and benefits in mind for the interview.

Collaborative Studio students present MSU Golf Course shelter project

December 5th, 2014 Comments Off on Collaborative Studio students present MSU Golf Course shelter project

Collaborative Studio reviews 12012014_7

This year’s fall Collaborative Studio, which consists of second-year architecture and building construction science students, built two shelters for the MSU Golf Course.

Students are putting the final touches on the project before a ribbon cutting ceremony will be held in the spring.

Final reviews of the project were held in the Giles Gallery on December 2.

Professors:
Emily McGlohn (coordinator and assistant professor, architecture)
Lee Carson (lecturer, building construction science)
Hans Herrmann (associate professor, architecture)
Tom Leathem (assistant professor, building construction science)

Read more about this year’s studio.

School of Architecture students wrap up year with final reviews

May 8th, 2014 Comments Off on School of Architecture students wrap up year with final reviews

Collaborative Studio (third-year architecture and third-year building construction science students)

Collaborative Studio (third-year architecture and third-year building construction science students)

Jury reviews for the School of Architecture were held April 25 through May 5.

Students in each studio presented their final projects before a jury.

First-Year Reviews, April 28:

Second-Year Reviews, April 25:

Third-Year Reviews (Collaborative Studio), April 30:

Fourth-Year Reviews, April 29 and May 6:
The fourth-year studios presented proposals for the Mississippi Maritime Museum to be located in Pascagoula. See a story about the project.

Fifth-Year Reviews, May 2 – 3:

Read more about each studio’s final projects.

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